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Muscles tire before losing steam (Read 290 times)


Not dead. Yet.

    Suggest that you carry and protien bar or something to eat on the long runs too. Something that agrees with you.  On my first fourteen mile long  slow distance run I got so hungry I could've at the bark of a tree!! Needless to say I hit a wall near the end nad had to walk the last mile in.

     

    I've heard others say not to eat while running so as to teach your body to use fat for energy.  Previously, I was taking along a gel and it helped a bit, but I stopped doing that.

     

    I have a hard time counting it as a run if I'm walking.  I guess I need to learn to swallow my pride sometimes.  Either way I always get 'er done, however hard it is.

    How can we know our limits if we don't test them?

       

      Why not?

       

      I didn't go into details in my last post, but here is what I meant.

       

      - Negative splits are the optimal way to race, and by optimal I mean fastest.

      - To have a chance at negative splitting a race, you have to practice it in training.

      - To practice negative splits, avoid starting too fast. For most runs, this means starting quite slow.

      - If you can't finish a run (any run) at least slightly faster than you started, then you went out too fast.

      - A large negative split is not needed; even a small differential is good.

      I think I understand, and agree, with what Dakota has said.  The more mileage I run the slower I seem to need, or want, to start my daily runs and it doesn't matter what kind of run (easy, recovery, inerval, tempo etc) they are.  I start off almost at a stumble and allow myself to warm into the run.  Makes for every run being a 'negative split' if you want to call it that.  The key is to warm into your runs and don't just begin running trying to hit whatever pace or effort you want for the run.  Ease into it.

      drifter


         

        Why not?

         

        I didn't go into details in my last post, but here is what I meant.

         

        - Negative splits are the optimal way to race, and by optimal I mean fastest.

        - To have a chance at negative splitting a race, you have to practice it in training.

        - To practice negative splits, avoid starting too fast. For most runs, this means starting quite slow.

        - If you can't finish a run (any run) at least slightly faster than you started, then you went out too fast.

        - A large negative split is not needed; even a small differential is good.

         

        "Every" in your earlier statement really scares me and Matt, I am guessing for Matt.

        gilbertholdings


          i find that doing squats helps out a bit.  maybe there are more targeted exercieses, but squats are pretty good in general

            You may find as you run more and run more long runs, that you'll be able to handle your long runs better. Give your body time to adapt. You might consider doing more hilly runs, if you have the topography. I'm talking rolling hills at easy effort, not hill repeats - just keep moving.

             

             

            General comment: Negative splits are a nice when you have an even route. It's not something I'd aim for if first half is more downhill than uphill (like starting on rim of a valley), snow gets softer (warmer temperatures or more snow falling or lots of users chewing up the trail), or start downwind and have to return upwind (or a storm blows in while you're out there), or other similar situations. These should be obvious, but sometimes get overlooked.

             

            By the same token, having the reverse situation, like going up a mountain, then coming down - well, I'd hope we can negative split those. Wink

             

            Have fun!

            "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog

              If you start doing intervals, split timing, any speed work before building up your endurance, you're just asking for injury. Most running literature says a minimum of 16 weeks of endurance training before beginning any speed or hill work. Of course everyone has their own opinion, but I agree with most of the writers on the subject.

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