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Bad running form? (Read 164 times)


Joggaholic

    I usually run alone, but I did a few group runs recently and it was pointed out to me by several runners that my feet tend to point outwards a lot at the end of the kick (so the toes are not pointing down toward the ground). I never realized it before but I was able to find a pic of myself running that shows the issue: http://azulox.zenfolio.com/p181494627/e538cd8a4

     

    When I land I can see that my feet are pointing forward, so the "twist" happens afterward. Since my feet are behind me I can't really visually check myself as I run. First of all, is this a big problem (like causing poor running economy or become more injury-prone...etc)? And if so, is there any drills or techniques I can do to help correct this? Right now I just try to consciously point my toes downward after I push off but it felt kinda awkward and I can't really see if I am doing it right.

     

    Thanks.


    Interval Junkie --Nobby

      107, 104, 102, & 98 have the same form on that page -- which doesn't really tell you anything other than this form seems common from the small sample.

      2014 Goals:  sub-3 Marathon 

      Current Status 08/28: Slowly working back up from a pelvic stress fracture.  4mil distance PR w00t!


      Joggaholic

        MTA: I don't think it's a pronation issue, I'm fairly neutral and probably slightly supinate(?) based on the wear on my shoes (more wear toward the little toe)

          Looking through some of my photos I have similar issue (non-issue?) and so do a few other runners around me.  More pronounced while running faster, either downhill or kicking at the end of races.


          sugnim

            Does it hurt?  Because, I'm thinking that if you aren't having problems, then you should just keep doing what works for you.  Every body is different.

            cincyjacket


              I don't know the answer to your question. But I'm wondering why there aren't more people running with the pacer on photos 111 and 112. She's hot!

                It could be a byproduct of the race-finish deceleration.  Seems less common among those who appear to be running through the finish.

                “Everything you need is already inside.” -- Bill Bowerman


                Pura Vida

                  I think I remember seeing one of the top finishing women in the Olympic marathon with a similar stride.

                  PRs: 5K: 25:35 / 10K: 53:03 / 10mi: 1:26:15 / HM: 1:55:02

                  Upcoming: Beat the Blerch 10K 9/21, Portland Marathon (debut) 10/5

                    I catch myself doing this as well (I can sometimes see it happening while looking down while running) and it annoys me.  I was told not to worry about it when I asked about it in a running store.  But I try to eliminate it as best I can because, rightly or wrongly, I tend to associate it with an inefficient stride.  I feel like I move with smoother, easier propulsion when my feet are going straight back.