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Fastest/Slowest Marathon Courses (Read 4591 times)

va


    Based-on your own personal experience, what you've heard from others, or what you've read - what are the fastest and slowest marathon courses in the US? In the world?
      Can’t help with the US ones. But here in New Zealand - Christchurch marathon is supposed to be fast. Plus in Europe - Rotterdam, Berlin and London are all fast.
        From what I've heard ... Chicago and Steamtown are both pretty fast marathons. Big Sur is a slow course ... I'd think any moutainous, very beautiful, scenic marathon is slow, but rewarding in other ways ... yes yes, I'll plug THE FLYING MONKEY Big grin
        2009: BQ?
          Hey Steve: You might find this thread interesting. It's sort of related to your question. You may also find it painfully boring. You decide. Smile http://runningahead.com/forums/topic/7593c01d9f06411cb949d2b7b91ee44b The short answer to your question is probably always going to be ... it depends. As you'll see if you read that thread, it doesn't seem that the flattest course is necessarily the fastest. There are some that have a net loss in elevation, some pretty significant - I'd guess those are generally faster. Depending on average temperature, and the elevation above sea level ... and whether any particular runner feels particularly good that day. Internationally, I've heard Rotterdam and Berlin are fast, if you feel like traveling - well, depending on where you live. Here's a few more answers for you. I've heard some of the same things about Steamtown, and a lot of people seem to think Chicago and Austin are fast. I ran Chicago - all I remember is pain, so I'm not the best judge. http://www.letsrun.com/forum/flat_read.php?thread=1084414 I'd guess that for slowest marathon, at least among the relatively well-known ones, Pike's Peak would be way up on the list. If I recall correctly, most folks claim it takes at least twice as long plus a little more to run it as to run an average marathon.
          E-mail: JakeKnight2002@aol.com
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          Imminent Catastrophe

            Tucson Marathon and St George Marathon (Utah) are pretty fast courses. I've done Tucson, it's downhill, but a nice, gradual downhill, not a quadbuster. There was a strong southwest wind in the second half that slowed us down last year, though. BTW there's another Jake-followed-by-PerfesserR-posting. Enjoy! Big grin

            "Able to function despite imminent catastrophe"

             "To obtain the air that angels breathe you must come to Tahoe"--Mark Twain

            "The most common question from potential entrants is 'I do not know if I can do this' to which I usually answer, 'that's the whole point'.--Paul Charteris, Tarawera Ultramarathon RD.

             

            √ Tahoe Rim Trail 100M 20/21 July 2013

            Boston Marathon 21 April 2014

            Tahoe Rim Trail 100M 19/20 July 2014


            A Dance with Monkeys

              Pikes Peak does take time. The ascent portion (the first half) usually takes you 100-150% of your normal marathon time, and the descent (the second half) can take another 40-60% of the ascent time. When I ran it last year, my marathon PR was 3:50. My ascent time at Pikes Peak was 4:17 and my total round trip was 6:48. I came in above the 50th %ile for my division with my 6:48. Yes. It IS 26.2 miles. Slow enough for you? Wink
              va


                Thanks everyone, keep 'em coming!
                Hey Steve: You might find this thread interesting. It's sort of related to your question. You may also find it painfully boring. You decide. Smile http://runningahead.com/forums/topic/7593c01d9f06411cb949d2b7b91ee44b...
                Yes JK, I know about that thread (read carefully, and you'll see I am in there too), and it's the reason I started this thread. In order to come up with an algorithm for a course difficulty rating, it would be good to have some races on both ends of the spectrum to test the algorithm against. That why I asked the question...
                  Thanks everyone, keep 'em coming! Yes JK, I know about that thread (read carefully, and you'll see I am in there too), and it's the reason I started this thread. In order to come up with an algorithm for a course difficulty rating, it would be good to have some races on both ends of the spectrum to test the algorithm against. That why I asked the question...
                  And this is why we actually read whole threads. To think just today I was mocking poor Trent's reading comprehension skills ...
                  E-mail: JakeKnight2002@aol.com
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                  A Dance with Monkeys

                    To think just today
                    No. I have never danced with the devil by the pale moonlight. Sheesh.


                    I've got a fever...

                      CIM (California International Marathon) in Sacramento is pretty fast.

                      On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.

                      RunFree7


                      Run like a kid again!

                        I've heard Columbus Ohio is a pretty fast course. Can anyone confirm or deny that one? I've also heard Chicago is a fast one as well along with Grandmas in MN.
                          2011 Goals:
                          Sub 19 5K (19:24 5K July 14th 2010)
                          Marathon under 3:05:59 BQ (3:11:10 Indy 2010)
                          CIM in Sacramento, Austin, Chicago are all fast in the US. London, Rotterdam, Berlin are fast. Boston and New York are medium. Big Sur is slow. Steamtown drops 900 feet so is beyond aided. I'm thinking things like Pikes Peak are, to borrow a cylcing expression "beyond category" and can not be compared to "normal" marathon race courses.

                          Runners run.


                          A Dance with Monkeys

                            Peak of course is slow because of : 1) elevation above sea level; 2) the highly technical nature of the trail; and, 3) the narrow trail surface. Of course we could include these factors in a formula...


                            The voice of mile 18

                              heard steamtown and philly are. I've done philly 3 times and am frightfully slow - it must be the course not my lack of training
                              4/18 Rutgers Half Marathon 7/20 Antrhacite Olympic Tri 9/25 chesapeakeman Ultra distance Tri Rule #1 of Triathlon Training/Racing - If Momma ain't happy nobody is happy http://community.active.com/people/Joe_h1/blog
                              Scout7


                              CPT Curmudgeon

                                heard steamtown and philly are. I've done philly 3 times and am frightfully slow - it must be the course not my lack of training
                                *snerk*
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