The Mile (Read 585 times)


I've got a fever...

    You've read Once a Runner, so you already know the best workout -- 100 x 400m 

     

    If you want any chance at breaking 5 you better go out in 74/75 and hang on. 

    Yup.  Starting out in the 80 sec range will put you too far back, and if you start much faster than say 72, you're looking at a painful positive split.

     

    When I think mile workouts, I think 12x400 around 74~75 with a 200m recovery jog.  Take this suggestion with a grain of salt -- my coaches seemed to think this was a good idea back in the 1980's -- no idea if it would be considered sensible now, especially for a 40-something like yourself.

     

    Good luck!

    On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.


    Interval Junkie --Nobby

      I like 300s at race pace (maybe 5 or 6) -- shouldn't feel too hard. Don't worry about wearing yourself out with them; just do enough to feel like you can feel the pace and stay RELAXED while you are running them.

       

      Yep, two weeks isn't much time.  I'm looking to see what I can do "off the bench" as it were and then work on it until Chicago marathon training starts again.

       

      300m @ RP, what interval?  90secs slow-jog?  90-sec float (7:00pace?).  30sec standing rest?  I'm confused on what I'm trying to target/improve with these other than knowing what the pace feels like.  If left to my own (misguided) devices, I'd probably do a 30sec stand and gun it again to work into the burn.

      2014 Goals:  sub-3 Marathon 

      Current Status 08/28: Slowly working back up from a pelvic stress fracture.  4mil distance PR w00t!

      scappodaqui


      rather be sprinting

         

        Yep, two weeks isn't much time.  I'm looking to see what I can do "off the bench" as it were and then work on it until Chicago marathon training starts again.

         

        300m @ RP, what interval?  90secs slow-jog?  90-sec float (7:00pace?).  30sec standing rest?  I'm confused on what I'm trying to target/improve with these other than knowing what the pace feels like.  If left to my own (misguided) devices, I'd probably do a 30sec stand and gun it again to work into the burn.

         

        I'm no expert, but I have trained for the mile with coaching quite a bit, and the consistent advice I have received from coaches is that full rest in workouts is really for earlier in training, not a few weeks out from the race... I would do at least a jog, and if doing 300m repeats, just 1:00 recovery or so.

        PRs: 5k 19:25, mile 5:38, HM 1:30:56

        Lifting PRs: back squat 176 lb

           

          I'm no expert, but I have trained for the mile with coaching quite a bit, and the consistent advice I have received from coaches is that full rest in workouts is really for earlier in training, not a few weeks out from the race... I would do at least a jog, and if doing 300m repeats, just 1:00 recovery or so.

           

          Sounds good to me. Enough rest to get the heart rate back down. 60-90s slow jog should do it. (maybe 200 jog)

            The most surprising thing for me was how fast mile pace felt, right from the gun. I had not really raced anything shorter than 5k since high school and nothing on the track.

             

            My whole running background was I had been a pretty average middle distance runner in high school (mostly 800), then no competitive running at all in college or throughout my 20's. When I started running road races in my 30's I used to go out way too fast in very race but eventually learned not to do that (as bad.)

             

            Now I was racing a mile in my 40's. When the gun went off I was shocked at how fast it went out. I was in dead last just hanging on. I was sure I was being pulled out way too fast but when we came through the 400 I was right about where I wanted to be ... like 73 I think. I had a momentary panic attack over the fact that I was red lined and I had only run 400 meters at goal at a pace that it turns out had not been too fast. But then I also remembered I only had 1200 to go. In a 5k that would have been almost time to kick. I just kept pushing really really hard and it felt way more intense the deeper I got into the race. The last 400 is pretty much indescribable. But in the end, after what felt like a 4 minute and 58 second knock down, drag out, street brawl, I had run basically even splits.

             

            If I had hesitated or even thought about strategy it for a moment in that first 400 there's no way I could have gone out hard enough to give myself a chance for sub 5. Because it feels totally suicidal if you're 40-something and not used to it.

            Runners run.

              Two summers ago I entered the 800 and 1500m races of a Master's USATF meet. Mikey's experience is pretty much how I felt. I thought I was ready for the fast pace, but I wasn't, especially the 800.

               

              One of the benefits of the short fast reps is just getting used to running fast. I think if I had come back one week later and re-ran my races, I would have ran better.

               

              In all, it really sucked, but I'd do it again.

                I've run/raced the mile most years since 1977 (running sub 5s through age 48) and went 5:03 and 5:10 in the past two years--and much of the difference is preparation (more on that below). To approach your season's potential at the mile you will need about 4-6 weeks with specific training. Make that 6-8 weeks specialized training to really get at it.

                 

                If you're coming off of Boston with some issues and you're in the pool now, not able to do fast work on the track or a grass field, there isn't enough time to really nail the mile (unless you're a fast twitcher, and close to 100% healthy). Pool running can help, but it's not likely to quite going to get you there.  So your road mile seems like a better choice. Get through next week's masters mile--without creating more issues--and aim for the better effort in June.

                 

                To get there, you need about 1 to 1.5 miles a week of mile-specific or faster speedwork. I like to build gradually, starting with 1 min fartlek reps with a full recovery. Maybe 4-5 to begin for a week or two. Then 4 X 400 at current pace (should feel hard but doable) for a week or two (jog recovery = to rep length), then mix it up some, including a longer rep each week. So it might be 1X 600, 2X 400 and 2X300; then 1X800, 2X400, 2X200; 1X 1000, 2X 400; 1X 1200, 3X 300 (with the last 2 reps getting closer to 800 m pace). And then race a week or 10 days later.

                 

                re: my miles in 2012 vs. 2013. In 2014 I did a build up much like described in the previous paragraph; in 2013 I was more focused on long runs and base work that month and just 5X 300 or 4X 400 a few times. Plus last year I went out in 79 or 80 (see below for caveats of that).


                Finally, try to pace yourself evenly. If you go out in 80 it's really hard to make it up on the last lap. Unless you are natural kicker (fast twitcher)you often just end up running out of gas on that last lap.

                  Lots of great advice in here and from folks more seasoned than I.. I do want to mention that the one workout that I always felt got me ready to race the mile both when I was running it in high school and recently (I'm 38) is the 'Bannister': 10x400 at mile pace with 200 recoveries. There have been similar listed in this thread and more than anything I think it prepares you for how you'll feel toward the end of the race. By the last quarter or two of that workout you're 'climbing the ladder' and getting myself into that space incrementally over ten quarters always helped me to learn to manage it better.


                  Feeling the growl again

                    To transition from longer distances to the mile, you need to build neuromuscular coordination to make the faster pace not feel so hard (higher muscle recruitment), and a higher lactate tolerance.  The first you can make great strides in over 2 weeks, the latter would definitely take 4-6 weeks to make a significant difference.

                     

                    Go out twice a week and run 200m accelerations....50m to get up to speed and 150m at nearly all-out.  I say nearly, as you really want to focus on keeping these smooth and your turnover high.  You don't want to be tightening up and fighting.

                     

                    You should find that after 3-4 of these workouts the faster pace feels much easier.  I'd day 8-10 of them in a workout with full recovery.

                    "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                     

                      great thread...stadjak, again I might try following your footsteps.  looking at a mile race on June 7, and thinking about how to get there from marathon training.  this thread is helpful.

                       

                      for me, my biggest fear is rebuilding speed, and I dont think I can get there too quickly without straining something.  I'm not such a fan of 200s unless its something like spaniel laid out...too easy to get caught up sprinting against the watch.  I like 400-800 stuff, esp ladders (2-4-6-8-6-4-2, etc).

                       

                      good luck and stay healthy.


                      Feeling the growl again

                        great thread...stadjak, again I might try following your footsteps.  looking at a mile race on June 7, and thinking about how to get there from marathon training.  this thread is helpful.

                         

                        for me, my biggest fear is rebuilding speed, and I dont think I can get there too quickly without straining something.  I'm not such a fan of 200s unless its something like spaniel laid out...too easy to get caught up sprinting against the watch.  I like 400-800 stuff, esp ladders (2-4-6-8-6-4-2, etc).

                         

                        good luck and stay healthy.

                        Yes, you are not trying to PR in the 200.  You are working on running fast smoothly and in control.  It's all about the neuromuscular angle, not the burn.

                         

                        FWIW my mile PR was run about 5 weeks after my marathon PR.

                        "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                         


                        Muddling through

                          Getting to where mile race pace feels comfortable and not a strain will be the biggest challenge. 200m-400m repeats with equal distance jog recoveries working gradually to bring them down to goal race pace is probably the simplest method. I don't think two weeks is enough time to get to where you could be, but not that far off either. I'd go with the classic 8-10 x 400m at mile race pace with 400m jog recovery. Coming off a sub-3:00 marathon I think I would start with 80 seconds per 400m for the initial workout and work down to as close to 73-74 as you can in the time remaining while still finishing the workouts feeling capable of running one or two more intervals if you pushed yourself to your limits.

                          2014 Goals: Run first trail ultra, first 100K, and see what I can do in a 24-Hour race

                            My two pence

                            Do something like two sets of 4 x 400m with a quick 200 jog in between reps and a long break between sets. The length of the long break is determined by how you you feel. You'll know when you're ready to go again. This might be up to 30 minutes for some folk. Get your sweats on and just mince around the track during that time. Take a few minutes standing recovery after the first set, if you need it, but not too long.

                             

                            Spaniel speaks wisely, as ever. You have to run this race with the fitness you already have. As previously mentioned, you don't have time to build anything new in terms of speed. The purpose of the short recoveries is for you to get used to the feeling of running fast so that come race day you don't shit yourself and panic that you're totally redlining from the gun. Quick jogging the recoveries also stops you kidding yourself you're fitter than you are by blasting off the start line after a static recovery.

                             

                            A disclaimer as with all advice: This is based purely on my experience, not much science and a little bit of rationalization. You'll do what you do and run what you run and still wake up the next morning.

                             

                            One more thing: if you're legs are fucked and you can't even do track workouts without the risk of injury, why the fucking hell are you planning on running a mile race you fool?

                              Workouts like 8 or 10X 400 at pace are well and good, but for a dinged up masters runner recovering less than 2 weeks post marathon, that's a recipie for more injury. Again, it takes some time and training to build up to workouts like that.

                                I just raced a mile last night after no real specific training for it.  April turned out to be a pretty crappy month for me running-wise and i was concerned that I wouldn't beat my time from last year.

                                 

                                i did get a couple miles in at a casual pace and then some strides to open up the legs before getting in the corral for the race.

                                 

                                Then, Boom!   Off like a cannon blast, hurling down Main Street in downtown Cincinnati.  The race was setup in waves and i was in the final wave before the "elites."  my wave consisted of runners that said they were projected to finish between 7:00 - 4:30.

                                 

                                The first quarter mile when by in a blur.  I think i was on pace for under 5 and knew that was too fast for me.  I hit the halfway mark at 2:36.  I decided not to let anyone pass me the rest of the way home and started looking for people to catch.  I let one guy get by me, but ran down two others on the way in.  I ended with a 14 second positive split, which seems pretty poor.  I should have fought harder in the middle of the race.

                                 

                                Lungs burned.  I hacked and coughed for about an hour after.  Big regret that I didn't run hard enough to puke.  My buddy did though.  I was awesome.

                                 

                                finished officially in 5:26.  11th in my wave. I got to watch the Elite women and men cruise to the finish.  Those kids were fast.

                                 

                                What a fun time.  I'd recommend it to everyone.

                                nothing to see here.