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Trent - Good Samaritan (Read 1067 times)

    This isn't a "Look What I Can Do" post ... its a "Look What He Did" post. I know that our own resident physician and all-around-nice-guy Trent would be too modest to relate this story, but I was so impressed that I wanted to do him the honors. I may have some of the details wrong, but I think you'll get the gist of the tale. During this weekend's Grandma's Marathon, under fairly brutal warm weather conditions, Trent apparently came across a runner suffering from hyponatremia. Trent not only stopped his race to assist the runner and the medical staff, but Trent offered up his last gel packet so that the distressed runner could get some needed sodium. Trent then went on to finish the marathon, his third full marathon in eight weeks. Shocked Cheers, kudos, and congrats to Trent!
    How To Run a Marathon: Step 1 - start running. There is no Step 2.
      Wonderful work Trent! Once a dr., always a dr...and being a nice person to start helps too! Congratulations. Big grin

      Michelle



        wouldn't expect anything less from our resident doctor! WTG!!

        Your toughness is made up of equal parts persistence and experience. You don't so much outrun your opponents as outlast and outsmart them, and the toughest opponent of all is the one inside your head." - Joe Henderson


        Dog-Love

          Good on you Dr. Trent. How about running a marathon in October with me just in case I pass out along the way?
          Run like you are on fire! 5K goal 24:00 or less (PR 24:34) 10K goal 50:00 or less (PR 52:45) HM goal 1:55:00 or less (PR 2:03:02) Marathon Goal...Less than my PR (PR 4:33:23)


          Sandi Sue

            Smile Hey Crabby Woman. I should be working but I can't seem to get my mind in that gear. What are you up to lately?

            Races for 2013:

            Kluane Bike Relay (4 legs 70 miles)

            Calgary 70.3 (72.3)

            Aukeman Sprint Triathlon 8/6/2013

             

             

            Pain is Temporary  Pride is Forever


            A Dance with Monkeys

              Awww shucks. Hot. Sunny. Black Flag raised. Runner down, cramping, pale, vomiting. Looked really bad, like crap. Yes, that is a medical term. Here is another. Likely hyponatremia. Mile 17. Yeah, I did stop to offer help, but there was alread a doc, a nurse, a paramedic and a stock broker there, so the bases were covered. I told them I thought he likely needed salt (which nobody had) so gave them my gel which has sodium in it. I was just out jogging anyway and he needed it far more than I did. About 3/4 mile later I got to flag down an ambulance. They were already helping out somebody else (who did not look all that bad) and I suggested that they needed to get to the first guy post haste. They said, "we know, we know", and I was embarassed to have to say, "he looks really really bad and I'm a doc". I hate to pull that card, but I don't think they believed that it was that serious. And on I ran... Hey, does that mean I can subtract time from my finish? Sheesh, Berner, making me blush. Oh. Seven weeks Wink
                Great job! Did you post a set of tips so folks here won't sufer from hypontremia?

                Vim


                Needs more cowbell!

                  I suggested that they needed to get to the first guy post haste. They said, "we know, we know", and I was embarassed to have to say, "he looks really really bad and I'm a doc". I hate to pull that card, but I don't think they believed that it was that serious. And on I ran... Hey, does that mean I can subtract time from my finish?
                  For that they should give you a subtraction of a minute or two...or at least I would. Smile k

                  I shoot pretty things! ~

                  '14 Goals:

                  • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

                  • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

                    Nice job, Trent. Smile

                    Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the number of moments that take our breath away...(unkown)




                    Go With The Flow
                    Thyroid Support Group


                    A Dance with Monkeys

                      Thanks all!
                      Did you post a set of tips so folks here won't sufer from hypontremia?
                      I have previously posted this: The reason why people get hyponatremia (low blood salt) is because they sweat out fluids that have a high concentration of salt and replace it with fluids that have a lower concentration of salt. Gatorade and other sports drinks have far less salt in them than sweat. So replacing your sweat with sports drinks does not work. For example, to replace the 1 gram of salt (sodium chloride) lost through a half liter of sweat, you would need to drink a whole liter of Gatorade. That is a half liter of extra water, which dilutes your blood salts. Them Jelly beans had salt in them. Gu packets have salt in them. In general, these do not have a lot of salt. Most have about 50 mg of sodium, which is equal to about 20 mg of salt. There are 1000 mg of salt in a gram. So you would need to take 50 gu packets or equivalent to replace a half liter of sweat. Most people cannot fathom eating nacho chips, potato chips or pretzels during a marathon, but these are commonplace to ultramarathons. Many people do eat a lot of salt in the days leading up to the marathon, or carry salt tablets with them during the marathon. Just in case. The Medics should also have salt tablets. You cannot salt-load like you carb-load because your kidneys efficienty remove excess sodium, but you can make sure your reserves are replenished. A good Mexican meal 3-4 days before your marathon, and there you go. Eat the whole basket of chips and this... Hyponatremia is a serious disease that merits watching out for. Hyponatremia is a condition in which you dilute your blood salt (sodium) with too much liquid, and it can be fatal (probably fewer than 1 marathoner dies every year from this). Fluids like gatorade and ultima still have far less salt than sweat, so drinking the same amound as you sweat can still dilute your blood. When extreme, hyponatremia causes weakness, hallucinations, lightheadedness and vomiting. Notice that these, except vomiting, are all the same symptoms as you would get with dehydration and with hypoglycemia. In a recent study in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers found: On univariate analyses, hyponatremia was associated with substantial weight gain, consumption of more than 3 liters of fluids during the race, consumption of fluids every mile, a racing time of >4:00 hours, female sex, and low body-mass index. On multivariate analysis, hyponatremia was associated with weight gain (odds ratio, 4.2; 95 percent confidence interval, 2.2 to 8.2), a racing time of >4:00 hours (odds ratio for the comparison with a time of over 3:30 hours, 7.4; 95 percent confidence interval, 2.9 to 23.1), and body-mass-index extremes. (N Engl J Med. 2005 Apr 14;352(15):1550-6.) That means, the risk factors for hyponatremia include 1. a marathon time > 4 hours (compared to time < 3:30) 2. being too big or too small, 3. being female, 4. drinking over 3 liters of fluids during the run, 5. gaining weight during the run. the researchers did not specifically look at the effect of ambient temperature, salt intake in the days leading up to the marathon, or whether drinking too much in the days leading up to the marathon contributed, but their study was performed on a hot day. remember, 3 liters is nearly a gallon; the cups at the marathon were all about 4-5 ounces full. there are 128 ounces in a gallon. that means you would need to have drunk about 25 cups of fluid in the 10 aid stations to have gotten just that one risk factor. some experts suggest weighing yourself before every marathon and writing your weight on your race tag; that way if you pass out the medics can weigh you. given the variation in scales i do not know if this would actually be useful. folks with hyponatremia have too much fluid on board, so they pee clear urine frequently. folks who pee infrequently and who have darker urine likely do not have hyponatremia. 3:30)="" 2.="" being="" too="" big="" or="" too="" small,="" 3.="" being="" female,="" 4.="" drinking="" over="" 3="" liters="" of="" fluids="" during="" the="" run,="" 5.="" gaining="" weight="" during="" the="" run.="" the="" researchers="" did="" not="" specifically="" look="" at="" the="" effect="" of="" ambient="" temperature,="" salt="" intake="" in="" the="" days="" leading="" up="" to="" the="" marathon,="" or="" whether="" drinking="" too="" much="" in="" the="" days="" leading="" up="" to="" the="" marathon="" contributed,="" but="" their="" study="" was="" performed="" on="" a="" hot="" day.="" remember,="" 3="" liters="" is="" nearly="" a="" gallon;="" the="" cups="" at="" the="" marathon="" were="" all="" about="" 4-5="" ounces="" full.="" there="" are="" 128="" ounces="" in="" a="" gallon.="" that="" means="" you="" would="" need="" to="" have="" drunk="" about="" 25="" cups="" of="" fluid="" in="" the="" 10="" aid="" stations="" to="" have="" gotten="" just="" that="" one="" risk="" factor.="" some="" experts="" suggest="" weighing="" yourself="" before="" every="" marathon="" and="" writing="" your="" weight="" on="" your="" race="" tag;="" that="" way="" if="" you="" pass="" out="" the="" medics="" can="" weigh="" you.="" given="" the="" variation="" in="" scales="" i="" do="" not="" know="" if="" this="" would="" actually="" be="" useful.="" folks="" with="" hyponatremia="" have="" too="" much="" fluid="" on="" board,="" so="" they="" pee="" clear="" urine="" frequently.="" folks="" who="" pee="" infrequently="" and="" who="" have="" darker="" urine="" likely="" do="" not="" have="" hyponatremia.=""></ 3:30) 2. being too big or too small, 3. being female, 4. drinking over 3 liters of fluids during the run, 5. gaining weight during the run. the researchers did not specifically look at the effect of ambient temperature, salt intake in the days leading up to the marathon, or whether drinking too much in the days leading up to the marathon contributed, but their study was performed on a hot day. remember, 3 liters is nearly a gallon; the cups at the marathon were all about 4-5 ounces full. there are 128 ounces in a gallon. that means you would need to have drunk about 25 cups of fluid in the 10 aid stations to have gotten just that one risk factor. some experts suggest weighing yourself before every marathon and writing your weight on your race tag; that way if you pass out the medics can weigh you. given the variation in scales i do not know if this would actually be useful. folks with hyponatremia have too much fluid on board, so they pee clear urine frequently. folks who pee infrequently and who have darker urine likely do not have hyponatremia. >
                        What a good guy!
                        2009: BQ?
                          Trent.Karma += 10;

                          When it’s all said and done, will you have said more than you’ve done?


                          Needs more cowbell!

                            When extreme, hyponatremia causes weakness, hallucinations, lightheadedness and vomiting. Notice that these, except vomiting, are all the same symptoms as you would get with dehydration and with hypoglycemia.
                            Trent, I've noticed that once I hit the 90 minute mark on a hot weather run that I definitely get weak, queasy, and chilled. Is this likely just an effect of the heat, or dehydration, or what? It was 80ยบ+ and humid on my last warm run. I felt pretty good until the last half hour or so when I didn't have any shade. I take ~40oz with me (Gatorade and water)...usually drinking at least 3/4 of this. k

                            I shoot pretty things! ~

                            '14 Goals:

                            • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

                            • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)


                            I've got a fever...

                              "...he looks really really bad and I'm a doc". I hate to pull that card
                              I would love to pull that card, which is probably one of the many reasons why I'm not a doctor. To me that card is 2nd place, right below the Supreme Court Justice Card. What is the Supreme Court Justice Card, you ask? Well, if you're one of The Nine, if anyone ever asks you to do anything, you can simply say: "F**k you. I'm on the Supreme Court." That would be cool. In fact, if I were on the Supreme Court, that would be my initial response anytime anyone spoke to me (except my wife).

                              On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.

                                I would love to pull that card, which is probably one of the many reasons why I'm not a doctor. To me that card is 2nd place, right below the Supreme Court Justice Card. What is the Supreme Court Justice Card, you ask? Well, if you're one of The Nine, if anyone ever asks you to do anything, you can simply say: "F**k you. I'm on the Supreme Court." That would be cool. In fact, if I were on the Supreme Court, that would be my initial response anytime anyone spoke to me (except my wife).
                                That's hilarious, Jeff!

                                When it’s all said and done, will you have said more than you’ve done?

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