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Bad News re my Plantar Fasciitis (Read 189 times)

bap


    I had a PRP injection on April 4th, with an estimate that I'd be able to begin light jogging within 2 months.

     

    The pf hasn't healed and I'm due to have a second set on injections next week. It'll be at least another 2 months before I can run.

     

    A PRP is Platelet Rich Plasma injection. The doctor takes some blood, then splits out the plasma, which is then injected directly in to the inflamed part of the heel. This inflames the injury even more, which triggers the body's natural defenses.

     

    The injections are a tad painful. My doctor told me I'm the only person she's known not to scream during the injections, for which I give myself a gold star.

    Age 52

    2016 Targets - 100 - 13.2s, 400 - 62s, 800 - 2:30, Mile - 5:40

      That sucks, sorry to hear it. Those PRP injections sound about as fun as a poke in the eye!

       

      I once stopped running for several years mainly due to PF. I just got tired of my feet hurting all the time. These days I don't usually have it, but it still comes around once in a while, due to me racing in flats or running too many training miles in shoes with no arch supports.

       

      At the moment I've been fighting PF in my right heel for the past 3+ weeks, since running a 12K race in unpadded racing  flats. The PF was sort of hanging around in the background for the past few weeks, but not very painful and not slowing me down much if at all. But then last Friday afternoon it suddenly flared up and was bad enough that I had to skip a planned 10k hill-climb fun run race on Saturday.  So I spent the day looking at YouTube video's on plantar faciitis and doing every stretch and exercise that was recommended by anyone. On Sunday I was able to tape my foot up and run 7x1 mile slowly on it, and that didn't seem to make it any worse. I continued doing all the PF stretches on Sunday all day and evening, and on Monday the pain was a bit less once again. I tried running a short ways without the tape on my foot and it was still too painful, so I taped it up and ran a couple of more miles. My legs were "stale" and not interested in running and I honestly think it was from all the stretching. Stretched muscles are not strong and springy muscles. But the PF continues to get better. I taped up the foot this morning and ran 2 miles on a hill, and it was not bad. My legs are still slow today, but once I dial it back on the stretching they will recover, and hopefully my PF pain will be gone. I'm avoiding running in those racing flats again for a while, and won't race as far in them when and if I do wear them again.

      Kyle50


        PRP sounds horrible, hopefully it works. I know inflammation can delay healing by constricting blood flow. I used a cold compression wrap to get rid of the pain and then a blood flow stimulator to encourage healing and my foot was feeling better in a couple of day, I could start running again after a 2-3 weeks. I still use the stimulator before running and the cold wrap after which has been keeping the pf at bay (knock on wood). I put the link in below for the site I got my wraps from, they get 5 star recommendation from me, I probably wouldn't be running without them.

         

        http://www.kingbrand.com/Plantar_Fasciitis_Treatment.php?REF=75PV1

        bap


          Thanks, I'll take a look,

           

          I think my pf may have started after I ran two back to back 5Ks in racing flats last Spring.

          Age 52

          2016 Targets - 100 - 13.2s, 400 - 62s, 800 - 2:30, Mile - 5:40

            Sorry. PFis horrible. It just has a way of staying and staying and staying.

            Current Weight: 160 lb

            Goal Weight: 130 lb

             

            endurancenerd


            Chief Endurance Dork

              I've seen PRP work wonders and also do nothing at all -- kind of par for the course with just about any treatment.

               

              I struggled with my PF for over a year....  I lucked out and just kept at all the treatments I knew were helpful and it finally relented.

               

              Interestingly, it stuck around for about 15 months in all and there is anecdotal evidence that some poorly understood inflammatory processes (most notably with frozen shoulder/adhesive capsulitis and a few references to PF as well) seem to run rampant for about 15-18 months and occasionally just.....poof, resolve themselves.

               

              A few years back I had a client that was suffering from frozen shoulder and we just weren't getting anywhere with it.  She suffered with it for months before she came in and she was at her wits end.  So I d/c'd her after giving it the old college try, only to have her come back about a month later, with no pain and full range of motion in her shoulder.  We were both stunned -- I had never seen a turnaround like that before.  So I did some research and found that with frozen shoulder and a few other diagnoses this has been known to happen on occasion.

               

              Wish I could bottle whatever reaction that was....

              NHLA


                PF is bad news.  Mine lasted over a year but it did go away.

                I did change to NBminimus but not sure if that helped or it just went away.


                Half Fanatic #846

                  ,

                  Just from personal experience:

                   

                  Five years ago, after exhausting all recommendations (except for shots) on how to resolve PF (heel lifts, night splint... blah, blah) I started wearing minimal shoes with 4mm>0mm heel lift on a permanent basis, including at work.  I also learned to run barefoot about half the time, which strengthened my feet and legs significantly - and it became enjoyable.  But I suspect that most people who "try" this approach give up too easily and/or try to do way too much at first. The process for me took several months, but I was able to run more and more along the way and since then without injury.

                   

                  I still stretch a little before each run by pushing against the wall or door with my forefoot for a minute with each foot (and with my heel on the floor) - I've stopped doing this a couple of times and each time a few days later, felt a slight twinge in my heel similar to a PF re-start.  But, my achilles are really tight, and that might be unique to me.

                   

                  I think a raised heel on shoes is a very real problem for some people. And I'm confident that what I did "cured" my PF. Or maybe it was all coincidental.

                  I can do 440 in 220            90% of running is half mental            I ran half of my last race on my left foot!

                   


                  Feeling the growl again

                    Disclaimer:  I believe that there is a high likelihood that PF leaves just as mysteriously as it comes, and whatever the person was trying when it went way gets credit despite correlation not equaling causation.

                     

                    That said...mine was debilitating a few years ago.  I tried all of the typical recommendations except injections and the Straussburg sock.  Nothing touched it.  I got extremely thick, cushioned shoes for work and that helped the acute pain but IMHO was just a band-aid.  Then I read more and elected to get the most minimal work shoes I could find, Merrill Tough Gloves (no longer made).  My PF was GONE within 2 weeks.

                     

                    Given my disclaimer, why do I believe this was real?  Because if I switched back to any other shoe the PF returned.  And when I went minimal again the PF went away.  Back and forth, over and over.  Over time, the amount of time I could go without the minimal shoes increased.  Now I can go a couple weeks or a bit more before I start getting any pain (3 years later).

                    ,

                    Just from personal experience:

                     

                    Five years ago, after exhausting all recommendations (except for shots) on how to resolve PF (heel lifts, night splint... blah, blah) I started wearing minimal shoes with 4mm>0mm heel lift on a permanent basis, including at work.  I also learned to run barefoot about half the time, which strengthened my feet and legs significantly - and it became enjoyable.  But I suspect that most people who "try" this approach give up too easily and/or try to do way too much at first. The process for me took several months, but I was able to run more and more along the way and since then without injury.

                     

                    I still stretch a little before each run by pushing against the wall or door with my forefoot for a minute with each foot (and with my heel on the floor) - I've stopped doing this a couple of times and each time a few days later, felt a slight twinge in my heel similar to a PF re-start.  But, my achilles are really tight, and that might be unique to me.

                     

                    I think a raised heel on shoes is a very real problem for some people. And I'm confident that what I did "cured" my PF. Or maybe it was all coincidental.

                    "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                     

                      I would echo what Spaniel said, and add that regular use of a Titleist golf ball also can do wonders.  I had PF years ago, horrible mornings, 18 mile runs where i would finish in my driveway and then crawl into my house because I couldn't walk once I stopped running.  Roll that golf ball under your foot, gently stretching and massaging it throughout the day.  I used this Sperry sandal as well and found relief.  http://www.sperrytopsider.com/en/santa-cruz-slide-sandal/10221M.html?dwvar_10221M_color=0782986#cgid=men-shoes-sandals-flip-flops&start=1