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I need a trail shoe. (Read 147 times)

Chris Pinney


    Raced the first of four 5 mile trail races this morning. Ran in road shoes but need a little more traction. Should be sloppy around here next weekend too. So, what has worked for you? I currently wear altra torins and brooks pure connect so something with a minimal drop and some cushioning. Thanks.


    Slow and Steady

      I find that with running shoes, every single person will give you a different answer, because it really depends on your feet, your preferences, etc. But since you're currently running in Altra and Brooks, I'd recommend the trail shoes that both companies make, both of which get good reviews. I think the Brooks is called Pure Grit? I run in the outstanding Cascadia 8s but they are not low-drop shoes, which you're looking for. And the Altra makes the Lone Peak and Superior.

      Eric S.

      Trail Mix ||| dailymile ||| RA log

      Goals: 50km, 50-miler, 100km, 100-miler


      slogger

        Altra just released the Olympus. More cushion than either the superior or lone peaks, and decent weight.

         

        Disclaimer: I'm a pretty committed altra customer.


        day after day sameness

          If you have a favorite road shoe, many of the shoe companies make a trail version of whatever your current road model is, or close to it.

          Choosing my words carefully has never been my strength I've been known to be vague and often pointless

          SillyC


            You would do well to ask around locally to see if there's a place where you can try some on.  In my area, there's only a couple of stores that even stock trail shoes!


            A Sweetheart

              I tend to use road shoes for trails that aren't really rocky/technical. A beefy road shoe is no different than half the stuff these companies are calling "trail" shoes.

               

              I do race on trails though, and have tried a ton of trail shoes before discovering LaSportiva's. They put out wonderful trail shoes. The friXion stuff they put on the bottom of their shoe is they same stuff they use in their climbing shoe. It is sticky and durable. I really recommend them unless you are looking for a hybrid road/trail shoe.

               

              A word of warning.  There are a lot of gore-tex trail shoes out there. They can be great for winter, or for keeping the feet dry.  That is until your first stream crossing. While they keep water out, they also do a great job of keeping water in.

              I want to do it because I want to do it.  -Amelia Earhart

                Totally agree that light trail shoes are unnecessary in most conditions.

                 

                If you're going to be running on really sloppy trails, you'll be very happy with something with big lugs. Go for more aggressive tread than you think you'll need. Little grippy treads will do nothing, no matter how ingeniously they're laid out ;-) Also, if the trails offer some steep downhills, I'd encourage you to also check outside what's offered in low drop shoes. I tend to run in low drop shoes on the road, but the best trail shoes I ever had were a pair of Salomon Speedcross 3s which I think are 13mm offset. The big heel helped take up some of the impact on those long, rocky descents. I'm pretty loyal to Salomon in general and they make a great shoe(and a lacing system that's second to none), but fair warning - many people find them too narrow.

                 

                Best of luck!

                  +1 on the Speedcross 3's.  Bought some a couple months ago and so far they are great in mud and snow.  Can't wait to try them on something dry...

                  Totally agree that light trail shoes are unnecessary in most conditions.

                   

                  If you're going to be running on really sloppy trails, you'll be very happy with something with big lugs. Go for more aggressive tread than you think you'll need. Little grippy treads will do nothing, no matter how ingeniously they're laid out ;-) Also, if the trails offer some steep downhills, I'd encourage you to also check outside what's offered in low drop shoes. I tend to run in low drop shoes on the road, but the best trail shoes I ever had were a pair of Salomon Speedcross 3s which I think are 13mm offset. The big heel helped take up some of the impact on those long, rocky descents. I'm pretty loyal to Salomon in general and they make a great shoe(and a lacing system that's second to none), but fair warning - many people find them too narrow.

                   

                  Best of luck!

                  Chris Pinney


                    thank you everyone for the suggestions. Leaning towards the Altra lone peak 1.5. I found them at running warehouse for 115. I am cheap. The tread on them seems aggressive enough though.

                    JimR


                      I STRONGLY recommend two shoes.  One for each foot.


                      just a simple cat

                        I STRONGLY recommend two shoes.  One for each foot.

                         

                        Brilliant!!   and a trail one one each as well, not one racing flat and one trail shoe, right?

                         

                        Running is stupid

                        jmctav23


                        2/3rds training

                          thank you everyone for the suggestions. Leaning towards the Altra lone peak 1.5. I found them at running warehouse for 115. I am cheap. The tread on them seems aggressive enough though.

                           

                          plenty of good cheaper than that options on their liquidation page...use the coupon code FB15D to take a further 15% off of the liquidation price.  Stay away from Merrell mix masters though, not durable in any way.  Saucony Peregrines are a good low drop but nicely cushioned option, even some Altras on liquidation for ~50 bucks if you really dig the zero drop thing.

                           

                          MTA:  I second what someone above said about having some drop in trail shoes even if you are used to low/no drop road running.  Having more cushioning under heels for steep downhills is really nice to take the bite out of rocky trails and less strain on calf/achilles on steep and or long uphills.

                          NHLA


                            Hokas work great on steep downhills on rocks. O drop  lots of cushion.

                            brandicted


                              You would do well to ask around locally to see if there's a place where you can try some on.  In my area, there's only a couple of stores that even stock trail shoes!

                               

                              better idea....you can also consult with amazon for your need.

                                +1 on the Speedcross 3's.  Bought some a couple months ago and so far they are great in mud and snow.  Can't wait to try them on something dry...

                                 

                                Bought 3 pairs of Speedcross 3's today for $29 a pair!!! I stole them from the clearance rack at the local running store.

                                2014 Goals:

                                #1: Do what I can do. <DOING>

                                #2: 365 Hours training <NOPE, INJURED>

                                 

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