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Hal Higdon or Jeff Galloway? (Read 281 times)

Runningaround5


    Which would you pick? I'm a first time HM runner.

      If I were looking for a program for a HM, I'd look at Running Wizard. It's got some meat in it, but can be based on number of days you can run, your longest long run, and some other things. It's time and intensity based (rather than distance and pace), so it's easy to adapt to hilly trails. (I haven't used it all the way through, but did get one of the programs a couple years ago. It's got a good diversity of workouts, which is what I was after. I just pulled out the pgm yesterday while I was thinking about training for this year, where I haven't decided what races I want to do yet.

       

      Is there a reason you're looking only  at HH or Galloway? How long have you been running and what earlier races have you done, if any? What does your current training look like? (making your log public helps people see what you've been doing)

       

      I just looked at their easiest programs, and really didn't like either. I'd probably modify Higdon - decent amount of mid-week runs, but I don't like long run progression. If it were a longer program to allow more buildup time, it would be better. Galloway has a longer program, but minimal running mid-week with everything piled in the long run. (I tend to like to run a minimum of 45-60 min, and those 30-min runs mid-week would drive me up a wall.)

       

      If you've been running longer, then one of their more advanced programs might work.

      "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog

        I think we need more information! As AKTRail said - why is it a choice between those 2? How much are you running now, how long have you been running, how long is your long run at the moment, do you have any longer-term goals for your running?

         

        That Galloway plan (which I just googled) is sort of, I dunno, like if you just wanted to tick "run a half marathon" off your bucket list and you're currently running for 30 minutes at a time, then ok, I guess. If you have longer-term interest in becoming a better runner then I would look for something that has you running a variety of distances and paces during the week. Higdon is a start, but depending on how much you're running now, 12 weeks might be a little short to really build up to half marathon fitness. I mean, with the Higdon plan you do your longest long run one week before the half marathon. Does your body really have time to make the necessary adaptations from that run? I'm guessing not. A 10 miler could take as long as 90 minutes or more (that's long! and tiring!)  and if your legs aren't used to it it takes a few days to recover...and then 7 days later a half marathon? Not convinced.

         

        I can second the plug for Running Wizard, as it is customizable to your needs and the progression is based on how long you can comfortably run for right now. I've only been doing it for 2 weeks but I'm really enjoying the mix of paces, and the structure of the week really works for me.

         

         

         

         

        If I were looking for a program for a HM, I'd look at Running Wizard. It's got some meat in it, but can be based on number of days you can run, your longest long run, and some other things. It's time and intensity based (rather than distance and pace), so it's easy to adapt to hilly trails. (I haven't used it all the way through, but did get one of the programs a couple years ago. It's got a good diversity of workouts, which is what I was after. I just pulled out the pgm yesterday while I was thinking about training for this year, where I haven't decided what races I want to do yet.

         

        Is there a reason you're looking only  at HH or Galloway? How long have you been running and what earlier races have you done, if any? What does your current training look like? (making your log public helps people see what you've been doing)

         

        I just looked at their easiest programs, and really didn't like either. I'd probably modify Higdon - decent amount of mid-week runs, but I don't like long run progression. If it were a longer program to allow more buildup time, it would be better. Galloway has a longer program, but minimal running mid-week with everything piled in the long run. (I tend to like to run a minimum of 45-60 min, and those 30-min runs mid-week would drive me up a wall.)

         

        If you've been running longer, then one of their more advanced programs might work.

          when training for me first marathon I used Hal higdon. If for know other reason it fit what I was looking for at the time.  It worked for macini achieve my goal.


          Muddling through

            Your goals and time frame should drive your choice along with your background including how long you've been running, how much you currently run, and your racing experience and history. There are better programs out there than either Higdon or Galloway if you have the time and flexibility in your schedule for more mid-week running.

            2014 Goals: Run first trail ultra, first 100K, and see what I can do in a 24-Hour race

            Rainey


              Here's a plug for Running Wizard. It is based on Lydiard training - the beauty of this system is that:

               

              1. It covers ALL the types of training progressively beginning with the slower paces to longer distances then faster paces through 5 developmental phases of training. (Lydiard is the grandfather of periodization).

               

              2. This type of development is the best way to ensure that you go into your race with as much oxygen carrying capacity as possible available to you at a wide range of paces. The most limiting factor in endurance sport is your O2 capacity, not your speed.

               

              3.  You develop pace amplitude, meaning you become efficient across the range from your jogging pace to your racing pace by optimizing mitochondria development on your muscle fibers - once developed they are there. You get faster year after year.

               

              4. Done correctly you will PEAK,-  another hallmark of Lydiard training and why it is the preferred system of most champion runners worldwide. Peaking means that your target race is a quantum leap forward from your training times. In my experience most American recreational racers expect to run their training pace in their race because they have don't train to peak. They mix up their training haphazardly and/or run hard too often or at the wrong times.  When it comes to race day they run the same pace that they have practiced in their regular training runs and are happy with it because they know little of the art of peaking. When I was racing I lived and trained to lift my game and run significantly faster  on race day, as did my competitors because we were bought up on a culture of Lydiard training.

               

              5. Beginners need to start correctly and develop their aerobic capacity first. Many start by emphasizing the wrong type of training thinking it will make them faster when it has the opposite effect in the long run. This system is the safest for someone starting out and will set you up for longevity in the sport, not burn you out.

               

              6. Running Wizard customizes the training to your current endurance and pace capabilities. something that the other plans do not do, except in broad categories. Beware of cookie-cutter plans. It means you are doing someone elses training.

               

              I hope this is helpful to selecting a training plan.

              - Lorraine Moller - Olympic Bronze Marathon Medalist  and President of The Lydiard Foundation

              pcaharrier


                That Galloway plan (which I just googled) is sort of, I dunno, like if you just wanted to tick "run a half marathon" off your bucket list and you're currently running for 30 minutes at a time, then ok, I guess. If you have longer-term interest in becoming a better runner then I would look for something that has you running a variety of distances and paces during the week.  

                 

                I have to concur with this.  I ran my first HM last September and used the Galloway run-walk plan.  I got to the finish line and that was my main goal (although I'm sure the heat and humidity played a big role in my not hitting my modest time goal).  Since I only ran the race because a couple friends from work and I decided to try it almost on a lark (and all of us were getting off the couch to do it) I was happy with the result.  If I had it to do over I'd probably have looked into some of the other plans suggested here.

                2014 goals: 2,000 | 52.5 | Marathon PR | Skip the injuries again

                  Id consider Coach Nobby's 'Running Wizard'.......Superior to anything Higdon or Galloway have come up wit....

                  Champions are made when no one is watching

                    Do you want to run the whole thing, or walk and run?  Galloway's program prepares you to take on the event in a manner distinct from an overwhelming majority of runners, who will run until the first to occur of the finish or exhaustion.  Galloway prescribes something else entirely.  I'm not mocking it - racing is about getting to the finish line, and the dudes in the Galloway 3:05 and 3:15 pace groups get there before me fair and square.  But decide that's what you want to do.  Most people prefer to steady-run the whole thing, so in the absence of any other information about you or your goals I'd try out a Higdon plan or, better yet, find a real-life first half marathon training group near you and hook up with them and follow whatever plan they're using.

                    Runningaround5


                      Ok so I'll be totally honest. I started running c25k last February. I could barely run. April I could run 5K, May 10K. Then we moved and I slacked off. My longest run was 11Km in August. September and October I was running twice a week. November I did better, 3-4 times a week. Then December hit, illnesses, busyness etc. Excuses I know. I didn't run for a month. I started back up after Christmas. I've been running 4 times a week 3-4KM each. My last long run was mid November and was 10Km. I signed up for a HM back in October. It's May 5th. I didn't foresee how awful December would be. I'm now feeling like I've bitten off more then I can chew. I should've seen that with 5 very busy children I should wait to have a big goal. Anyways, I REALLY don't want to quit the HM. If I get closer and I just know it's not going to happen then I won't do it. However I want to give it a good shot. I have 14 weeks.

                      I picked those 2 because they seem like the most popular. running wizard looks neat but I won't pay for a plan I can't see first.

                      I'm trying to run 5 days a week, but realistically I can get 4 in.

                      Please don't tell me I'm stupid, just tell me what to do.


                      A Saucy Wench

                        The Higdon plan is solid and will get you through.  I've never tried Galloway but it has a good reputation and fan base & will also get you through

                         

                        Really it is a matter of personal preference.  Is your preference to run continuously and slowly or would you rather run harder and take walk breaks.  Most runners develop a preference one way or the other pretty early on, especially if you have come off of C25K then you know walk/run intervals.  Do you like them or not?

                        I have become Death, the destroyer of electronic gadgets

                         

                        "When I got too tired to run anymore I just pretended I wasnt tired and kept running anyway" - dd, age 7

                        Runningaround5


                          Hmm.. sometimes recently I've needed a quick walk break, however it's annoying LOL I'd rather run slow and non stop.


                          A Saucy Wench

                            Well there is your answer.  It doesnt mean you wont decide to take walk breaks (I would plan on walking through water stops at least)  if you follow Higdon, but it isnt inherent to the philosophy like it is with Galloway.

                             

                            I think you will be fine, the base you had will come back quicker the second time and if you are just aiming to finish and not hate life, you have plenty of time.

                            I have become Death, the destroyer of electronic gadgets

                             

                            "When I got too tired to run anymore I just pretended I wasnt tired and kept running anyway" - dd, age 7

                            RunnerGalBeth


                              I am a fa of Galloway but just last week came acrosss info on this website about Phil Maffetone and low heart rate training.  I am sold on this method of traing and now am building my aerobic base.  Keeping my heart rate at the recommended level for me necessitates some walking.  At the end of the run/walk I still feel like I could do more.  Last Saturday I did 6 miles and felt great.  Half is scheduled for May and I know I will be ready.  Check out the user group on this website.

                              Runningaround5


                                Thank you! I bought the Hidgon iphone app!

                                I have to say Thank you for the encouragement and not telling me I can't do it Smile

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