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Heel Striking Leads to Injury? (Read 1212 times)


Dave

    I ran a mile and I liked it, liked it, liked it.

    dgb2n@yahoo.com

      Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2012 Jan 3.

      Foot Strike and Injury Rates in Endurance Runners: a retrospective study.

      Daoud AI, Geissler GJ, Wang F, Saretsky J, Daoud YA, Lieberman DE.

       

      PURPOSE

      This retrospective study tests if runners who habitually forefoot strike have different rates of injury than runners who habitually rearfoot strike.

       

      METHODS:

      We measured the strike characteristics of middle and long distance runners from a collegiate cross country team and quantified their history of injury, including the incidence and rate of specific injuries, the severity of each injury, and the rate of mild, moderate and severe injuries per mile run.

       

      RESULTS:

      Of the 52 runners studied, 36 (59%) primarily used a rearfoot strike and 16 (31%) primarily used a forefoot strike. Approximately 74% of runners experienced a moderate or severe injury each year, but those who habitually rearfoot strike had approximately twice the rate of repetitive stress injuries than individuals who habitually forefoot strike. Traumatic injury rates were not significantly different between the two groups. A generalized linear model showed that strike type, sex, race distance, and average miles per week each correlate significantly (p<0.01) with repetitive injury rates.

       

      CONCLUSIONS:

      Competitive cross country runners on a college team incur high injury rates, but runners who habitually rearfoot strike have significantly higher rates of repetitive stress injury than those who mostly forefoot strike. This study does not test the causal bases for this general difference. One hypothesis, which requires further research, is that the absence of a marked impact peak in the ground reaction force during a forefoot strike compared to a rearfoot strike may contribute to lower rates of injuries in habitual forefoot strikers.

      “Everything you need is already inside.” -- Bill Bowerman

        sport jester


        Biomimeticist

          Heel strike doesn't cause any injuries. Your heel hitting concrete does.

           

          Heel strike is our optimum running form. However that requires a soft surface for the heel to integrate with properly. Concrete and other hard surfaces have destroyed that natural relationship

           

          The ability to run with minimal impact on hard surfaces with heel strike is a skill to learn, yet few want to.

          Experts said the world is flat

          Experts said that man would never fly

          Experts said we'd never go to the moon

           

          Name me one of those "experts"...

           

          History never remembers the name of experts; just the innovators who had the guts to challenge and prove the "experts" wrong

             


            Dave

               

              Looks like he will land on the forefoot.  Great form!

              I ran a mile and I liked it, liked it, liked it.

              dgb2n@yahoo.com

                Looks like he will land on the forefoot.  Great form!

                 

                I think that ostrich is going to wallop him first, and the first thing to hit the ground won't be his foot. 

                C-R


                  I think that ostrich is going to wallop him first, and the first thing to hit the ground won't be his foot. 

                   I think Dave was referring to the ostrich. They guys form is horrible. That's why he can't outrun the bird. Darwin was right.


                  "He conquers who endures" - Persius
                  "Every workout should have a purpose. Every purpose should link back to achieving a training objective." - Spaniel

                  http://ncstake.blogspot.com/

                    Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2012 Jan 3.

                    Foot Strike and Injury Rates in Endurance Runners: a retrospective study.

                    Daoud AI, Geissler GJ, Wang F, Saretsky J, Daoud YA, Lieberman DE.

                     

                    PURPOSE

                    This retrospective study tests if runners who habitually forefoot strike have different rates of injury than runners who habitually rearfoot strike.

                     

                     Lieberman's studies are sponsered by Vibram:
                    http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2009/07/barefoot/

                    "..., while Lieberman’s research is sponsored by Vibram."

                    sport jester


                    Biomimeticist

                      That's the joke of Leiberman.... He created the studies to fit his pathetic running skills. If early humans had truly learned to run his way, you and I wouldn't be here....

                       

                      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22092253

                       

                      I'd respect Liverman more if he put his force plates at the end of a race in Africa, rather than 20 ft in front of the runner allowing them to sprint...

                      Experts said the world is flat

                      Experts said that man would never fly

                      Experts said we'd never go to the moon

                       

                      Name me one of those "experts"...

                       

                      History never remembers the name of experts; just the innovators who had the guts to challenge and prove the "experts" wrong

                        The question is not whether any person, in the abstract, should "footstrike."  The question is whether a particular runner should.  I say runners should run comfortably and let the feet fall where they may.  

                        "If you have the fire, run..." -John Climacus

                          I've been complimented by many on my perfect running form as they blow by me.  Nice people who have nothing else to say and could not bring themselves to say "you are doing great".   The tragedy is the alleged perfect form has not helped me get any faster.

                          sport jester


                          Biomimeticist

                            I fully agree with you.

                             

                            to refine your statement, that if you're running with optimum efficiency, that your proper landing mechanics will fall (no pun intended) into place naturally.

                             

                            For sprinting or acceleration, its running on your toes, not your forefoot.

                             

                            For optimum economy, that a heel strike will be the natural landing process, if the surface is soft. To land with optimum economy on concrete, requires learning how to place your heel on the ground.

                            Experts said the world is flat

                            Experts said that man would never fly

                            Experts said we'd never go to the moon

                             

                            Name me one of those "experts"...

                             

                            History never remembers the name of experts; just the innovators who had the guts to challenge and prove the "experts" wrong

                              "Because in the end, you won't remember the time you spent working in the office or mowing your lawn.  Climb that goddamn mountain."

                              Jack Kerouac

                              sport jester


                              Biomimeticist

                                Its biology; a mid or forefoot landing requires the calf muscle to be integrated into landing mechanics. Then it has to fire to slow heel impact.

                                 

                                Then after firing twice and fatigued, the calves have to fire to push off.

                                 

                                In contrast, a heel strike landing requires no calf muscle integration in the landing mechanics, and only fires once in push off.

                                 

                                Let me see six calf muscle firings per step or two firings per step, that's not a statistic, that's a fact....

                                Experts said the world is flat

                                Experts said that man would never fly

                                Experts said we'd never go to the moon

                                 

                                Name me one of those "experts"...

                                 

                                History never remembers the name of experts; just the innovators who had the guts to challenge and prove the "experts" wrong

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