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Observations of weight to speed (Read 1831 times)

    Good info in here. I lost 40# (205 to 165 lbs)last summer running lightly and eating better (less soda. Salad for lunch most days--I wasnt fanatical about my diet--I just cut out the in between meal crap..and cut out fast food).

     

    I have since gained most of it back--but am working my way back down. Should be at about 180-185 by the end of October--which is a healthy weight for me. 170-175 would probably be my ideal marathon weight. I plan on being there by spring when I hope to do the Pig--and then work in an ultra late spring early fall.

    marathon maniac #1293 2012 Goals 2000 miles - 100 miles in NC24-Fall


    Just a dude.

      Kelly:

       

      I remember you doing a mile race so I'm assuming that you do some sort of real speed training???  You actually lose quite a bit of weight (fat) when you do speed training, or anaerobic training.  Lydiard told me, when we were talking about carbo-loading, that anaerobic exercise is 19 times less economical than aerobic exercise.  What it means is that you burn your ATP a heck of a lot more/faster by doing anaerobic type exercise.  Of course, it's not that simple; you just can't do anaerobic exercise for too long and it's not all that mathmatic like 19 times or 18 times or whatever.  I used to actually see this when I was coaching; whenever my runners come to peak and they start doing sharpening, intervals and sprints and all that; their looks change.  That's when you start to see all the body's "definition", in other words, all those lines in your arms and legs.  Even their skin seems to get tighter and shinier.  In other words, they turn to an athlete.

       

      I don't really like to say this because, once again, you say something like this and all of a sudden people jump all over it and say, "Great!!  We should do more sprints to lose weight!!"  Well, it's not going to work that way so simply...  But something to think about.

       

      I'm building back up into shape right now.  So I'm not doing much real speed at all... Strides here or there... Mostly trying to lose the weight and build some base so that I can start doing more aggressive workouts later...

       

      My weekly schedule right now is something like:

      Monday - Easy 

      Tuesday - Fartlek / Tempo (+ Core work)

      Wednesday - Easy (+ Strides and drills)

      Thursday - Hills (Hilly trails or long repeats) (+ Core work)

      Friday - Easy 

      Saturday - Long (12 miles this week) (+ Core work)

      Sunday - Easy

      (My log is public if anyone cares to take a gander...)

       

      Those are my goals, but I work about 55-60 hours a week and have high school aged kids, so it doesn't always work out.

       

      I notice that when I do the up tempo stuff, my appetite increases. But I get worried that if I don't feed my body well, the muscles won't have what they need to recover and rebuild.  Still working out the details... I'm down to about 210, so if I can just keep the weight coming off for another 4 months or so I think I'll be in good shape for track next spring...

       

      -Kelly

      Getting back in shape... Just need it to be a skinnier shape... 

      DoppleBock


        Your nice and everything, but you really are not my type

         

        MTP

        (Mikey the Pig)

         

         170-175 would probably be my ideal marathon weight. I plan on being there by spring when I hope to do the Pig--and then work in an ultra late spring early fall.

        http://a-big-horse.blogspot.com/ 

        2013 Goals ~ Mar < 3:00, 5M < 29, 10k < 35  

         

          Muscle weighs a lot

           

          I gave up lifting weights 4+ years ago - So now my potential racing weight went from 195-200 down to 180-185 - I just need to get there.   I do not like the "No Weights" thing - I am starting to do really light weights - The arm I broke this summer is really crackling in the elbow - Whish is helping me stay light.

           

          If I would stay off the weights for another few years, my racing weight could get down to 165-170.  But thats likely the bottom with my frame.

           

          It's worth bearing in mind that you can't gain weight without a calories surplus, however much weight training you do. Many very light distance runners do weight training...

          JimR


            One thing I don't have to concern myself with is giving up muscle.  Can't give up what I don't have.

              Kelly:

               

              I remember you doing a mile race so I'm assuming that you do some sort of real speed training???  You actually lose quite a bit of weight (fat) when you do speed training, or anaerobic training.  Lydiard told me, when we were talking about carbo-loading, that anaerobic exercise is 19 times less economical than aerobic exercise.  What it means is that you burn your ATP a heck of a lot more/faster by doing anaerobic type exercise.  Of course, it's not that simple; you just can't do anaerobic exercise for too long and it's not all that mathmatic like 19 times or 18 times or whatever.  I used to actually see this when I was coaching; whenever my runners come to peak and they start doing sharpening, intervals and sprints and all that; their looks change.  That's when you start to see all the body's "definition", in other words, all those lines in your arms and legs.  Even their skin seems to get tighter and shinier.  In other words, they turn to an athlete.

               

              I don't really like to say this because, once again, you say something like this and all of a sudden people jump all over it and say, "Great!!  We should do more sprints to lose weight!!"  Well, it's not going to work that way so simply...  But something to think about.

               

               

              This seems to make sense in a general way.  When I'm just running lots of mileage and doing few, if any, really hard workouts I have to be careful about what and how much I eat or I start putting on pounds.  When I turn to a phase of training where I'm able to do 3 hard workouts every 10 days then it seems far easier to maintain weight or even drop a couple or a few pounds.

                One thing I don't have to concern myself with is giving up muscle.  Can't give up what I don't have.

                Not directly on-topic, but ... I was using a company's sizing chart to figure out which size arm and leg warmers to order for cycling.  My biceps measure a whopping 11.75" around the fullest part (unflexed).  I think my wife's guns are larger caliber.

                 

                 

                [No, honey, I was NOT saying you were fat!  I meant you're in shape from all that yoga!  No, not bulky in-shape, just damn-she's-fine-like-a-fitness-model in-shape.]

                “Everything you need is already inside.” -- Bill Bowerman

                DoppleBock


                  False

                   

                  I have gained 23 pounds in 3 days before - I did not have a calorie surplus of 80,000 - I started out glycogen deficient and  dehydrated and ended up glycogen surplus and full of poison and crap etc.  3-4 days later I would be down 20 pounds.

                   

                  Although you can not put on fat or muscle without a calorie surplus ... Your weight can vary significatly with hydration abd types of food you are consuming ... a pound of carrots is only 200 calories

                   

                   

                  It's worth bearing in mind that you can't gain weight without a calories surplus, however much weight training you do. Many very light distance runners do weight training...

                  http://a-big-horse.blogspot.com/ 

                  2013 Goals ~ Mar < 3:00, 5M < 29, 10k < 35  

                   

                    Your nice and everything, but you really are not my type

                     

                    MTP

                    (Mikey the Pig)

                     

                    ha. not even if I get down to 170? How bout if I get back to 165?

                    marathon maniac #1293 2012 Goals 2000 miles - 100 miles in NC24-Fall

                      No, honey, I was NOT saying you were fat!  I meant you're in shape from all that yoga!  No, not bulky in-shape, just...

                       

                      Had this been a conversation at a party I'd be giving you signal to stop talking because you are just digging.  Been there. 

                      In an infinite universe, the one thing sentient life cannot afford to have is a sense of proportion

                      http://htwins.net/scale2/scale2.swf?bordercolor=white&fb_source=message

                       

                       

                       

                        the best way to lose weight is with toning shoes.  oh wait...

                         

                        http://shine.yahoo.com/channel/health/reebok-paying-to-settle-charges-over-shoe-claims-2571097/

                        In an infinite universe, the one thing sentient life cannot afford to have is a sense of proportion

                        http://htwins.net/scale2/scale2.swf?bordercolor=white&fb_source=message

                         

                         

                         


                        I'm back!

                          And remember, if you want to run faster than light, you're going to have to make your weight imaginary.

                            False

                             

                            I have gained 23 pounds in 3 days before - I did not have a calorie surplus of 80,000 - I started out glycogen deficient and  dehydrated and ended up glycogen surplus and full of poison and crap etc.  3-4 days later I would be down 20 pounds.

                             

                            Although you can not put on fat or muscle without a calorie surplus ... Your weight can vary significatly with hydration abd types of food you are consuming ... a pound of carrots is only 200 calories

                             

                            Sure - you drink a cup of water then clearly your weight goes up by the weight of the water for zero calories consumed and very few expended.

                             

                            But that's missing the point (as I'm sure you already know). Hydration levels; amount of partially digested food in the gut and waste in your bowels; amount of glycogen stored in your muscles and so forth isn't what's going to make a difference to weight over the long run. What makes a difference is calories in and calories out. Of course the kind of exercise you do and the kind of foods you eat have an impact on how well you can change your body in the way you want.

                             

                            In the context of talking about weight training people have this idea that lifting will give you big muscles - of course it helps but it's not sufficient, you also need the calories to build the muscle tissue. The flip side is that it's perfectly possible to regularly lift and not gain muscle mass, provided you eat right. 

                              In the context of talking about weight training people have this idea that lifting will give you big muscles - of course it helps but it's not sufficient, you also need the calories to build the muscle tissue. The flip side is that it's perfectly possible to regularly lift and not gain muscle mass, provided you eat right. 

                               

                              Yep, in lifting forums I've seen lots of discussions of ways to maximize calorie intake (adding peanut butter to most meals, gallon of whole milk daily, etc, etc) specifically to get bigger as quickly as possible. For competitive lifters in the higher weight classes or unlimited weight classes eating enough is almost a part time job...

                                Sure - you drink a cup of water then clearly your weight goes up by the weight of the water for zero calories consumed and very few expended.

                                 

                                But that's missing the point (as I'm sure you already know).

                                 

                                Not entirely.  Lots of people trying to manage their weight fail to take the ephemeral fluctuations into account, and are consequently driven crazy by meaningless day-to-day changes in their weight.  That's why it's important to rely on a rolling average rather than a single weight reading.

                                Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

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