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Garmie Question (Read 1029 times)

    Confused Does anyone use the Virtual Trainer feature on their Garmen? I'm thinking about using it during Richmond to ensure that I don't go uot too fast.
    2009: BQ?
      I have not, yet. I wish it had a mild shock feature... to tell you when you were getting out of a particular pace zone.

      Vim


      A Dance with Monkeys

        I think Pam was checking it out, at least she talked about using it. I plan on doing so when I figure it out.

        Michelle



          I have not, yet. I wish it had a mild shock feature... to tell you when you were getting out of a particular pace zone.
          ZAP!!!!! Big grin

          Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the number of moments that take our breath away...(unkown)




          Go With The Flow
          Thyroid Support Group

            That seems like a bad idea. I think the garmin works best if you think of it as a data collection device and not as a during-the-run-feedback device. Your own body and mind are way better suited for that function than an external gadget. But then I'm a run by feel bigot.

            Runners run.


            Needs more cowbell!

              That seems like a bad idea. I think the garmin works best if you think of it as a data collection device and not as a during-the-run-feedback device. Your own body and mind are way better suited for that function than an external gadget. But then I'm a run by feel bigot.
              I think I'm with ya' on this one--you're a smarty pants, Mr. Mikey. I've never worn a Garmin, but I have run with a friend who has one and she has it beep at her if she gets below a certain pace. I think it's a bad thing unless used very carefully and could be disasterous during a race. I know my friend pushes herself more than she probably should (starts fast, dies by end of long run--I tend to do the opposite, which feels SO much better) and it hasn't been a positive thing for her training.

              I shoot pretty things! ~

              '14 Goals:

              • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

              • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

                I think Pam was checking it out, at least she talked about using it. I plan on doing so when I figure it out.
                I thought about using it during some of my training runs this spring. Don't think I'd use it during the race. I Ditto Mikey's thoughts!

                Your toughness is made up of equal parts persistence and experience. You don't so much outrun your opponents as outlast and outsmart them, and the toughest opponent of all is the one inside your head." - Joe Henderson

                  I use the advanced work out options on some races. It really keeps me from doing too much on some races that I'm using as training runs. Generally what I'll do is plug in a bunch of different steps that are keyed by the lap button. I'll give it a lower bound (the fastest I want to go) for various stages which will keep me from going too fast. I give it an upper bound of about 20 minutes / mile so I'm not using it too keep me going fast but to prevent me from losing sight of the goal of the race. It works well with that, I hate using when I'm letting things fly as there are so many factors that go into that and it just makes my day worse when i hear the watching beeping that I'm not keeping the speed I want when I know that. It adds to the frustration and makes my day miserable.
                    My problem with listening to my body is that when it feels good, I go faster ... and then around mile 18 I. Want. To. Die. Tongue I need to keep it in check for the first 20 miles of the marathon --- run a good, hard pace but not go too fast too soon ... 'tis why I asked!
                    2009: BQ?
                      i don't use it when i'm racing. but i do use it for the race pace sessions in the weeks running up to a target race. for example for my recent half i did 1 session a week for the previous 6 weeks at my target race pace, building from 3k to 6k. for those i used the garmin to make sure i was on pace target. next time round i'll do the same but probably building towards a 10kpace run a couple of weeks before the half.
                        I used mine once during a 5k race, one that I ran with my 16 y/o son. It was nice to be able look and see our pace since my son didn't want to exceed a certain pace for the first two miles. It helped him to have the energy at the end to zip past me and beat me. Roll eyes

                        Michelle



                          My problem with listening to my body is that when it feels good, I go faster ... and then around mile 18 I. Want. To. Die. Tongue I need to keep it in check for the first 20 miles of the marathon --- run a good, hard pace but not go too fast too soon ... 'tis why I asked!
                          I agree it's good to have a gameplan to keep your pace in check because you know you're going to be full of energy on race day. One thing you can do is take the first 15 (or 20) miles and make a rough plan for each 5 mile section. So if you want to average 8:55-9:00 for the whole marathon--take that time and multiply by 5 miles: you get 44:45 per 5 miles. Try to run the first 5 miles in no faster than 45:15, the next 5 no faster than 45:00, the next 5 no faster than 44:45, then go by how you feel the rest of the way. I find it really helpful to think about nothing else but that first 5-mile split in a long race like a marathon. Don't let yourself go under whatever target you set...if the first mile is too fast, you still have 4 miles to adjust so there's no need to panic.

                          Runners run.

                            I agree it's good to have a gameplan to keep your pace in check because you know you're going to be full of energy on race day. One thing you can do is take the first 15 (or 20) miles and make a rough plan for each 5 mile section. So if you want to average 8:55-9:00 for the whole marathon--take that time and multiply by 5 miles: you get 44:45 per 5 miles. Try to run the first 5 miles in no faster than 45:15, the next 5 no faster than 45:00, the next 5 no faster than 44:45, then go by how you feel the rest of the way. I find it really helpful to think about nothing else but that first 5-mile split in a long race like a marathon. Don't let yourself go under whatever target you set...if the first mile is too fast, you still have 4 miles to adjust so there's no need to panic.
                            Mikey, that is awesome advice for a game plan --- thank you!!!
                            2009: BQ?


                            I've got a fever...

                              I think MM has hit it right on the head. Good gameplan. I've never used the VT in a race, but I occasionally use it in training. It feels just a little too obsessive, and I'd rather not be constantly looking at my watch, though. However, it is good for training your body to get used to what a specific pace feels like. One thing about Garmie -- on your main screen, be sure to use Lap Pace instead of Pace. Pace is sort of an "instantaneous" reading of how fast your moving, but it tends to be very jumpy due to the variability of the unit and satellite reception. Lap Pace is your cumulative average pace for the current lap (which is usually a mile split if you're using Auto-Lap or hitting Lap at each mile split in a race). Lap Pace is much more stable than Pace, and is a good read on your current status. Check your lap pace regularly to ensure that you're not going out too fast. BTW, in a race, be sure to turn Auto-Lap off. Since Garmie and the race's mile markers are sure to differ by some small amount, you'll get very confusing lap distances if Auto-Lap and you manually hitting Lap at the mile-markers are fighting it out.

                              On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.

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