Suggestions for a new bike? (Read 1709 times)


Needs more cowbell!

    Damn, that's a tall head tube...heh.

    I shoot pretty things! ~

    '14 Goals:

    • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

    • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

      Damn, that's a tall head tube...heh.

       

      I think the Diamas may be be built a bit that way but, yeah, lot's of head on this one. Must be custom. Here's the centerfold.

       

        While I'm carrying on about bikes... Today a massager's bike in front of my building had a cannondale sticker on his/her bike cut up and rearranged to say something like "I ride on ale." It would have made a nice photo but was gone by the time I grabbed my camera. Sad


        Needs more cowbell!

          So pretty.  My MIL has a custom Seven...ugliest. bike. ever.  She basically wanted a road bike with hybrid geometry.  She is tall, but is mostly legs with a short torso and likes to be upright.  I don't know why she even bothered with drop bars...I have never seen her use the drops even once.  That thing has a freaky tall headtube.  I doubt she would ever be able to sell it, since it is so bizarrely proportioned (and that ugly thing).

          I shoot pretty things! ~

          '14 Goals:

          • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

          • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)


          Needs more cowbell!

            While I'm carrying on about bikes... Today a massager's bike in front of my building had a cannondale sticker on his/her bike cut up and rearranged to say something like "I ride on ale." It would have made a nice photo but was gone by the time I grabbed my camera. Sad

             

            Ha, too funny.  I could have that and a Cdale sticker and both would be accurate.

            I shoot pretty things! ~

            '14 Goals:

            • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

            • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

            sethf11


              If you are looking around that 850-900 price range, i would suggest a Specialized Allez. I got one brand new out the door with fitting included and a warranty as well as a few extras for $850 from a top f the line bike shop. Its a great road bike and you would be able to do triathlons with it. I did a few last year and had no problem keeping up with others on the course. Its 90% about fitness level. but the Allez will get you out there and not left behind in the dust like you would with a $150 bike from Walmart. Granted, its not a $5000 bike either but an entry level road bike.

                I bought two bikes to make my bike. I found a really good deal on an Orbea Frame and Fork for $750. It came with Everything but wheels, the groupset and a saddle. Then I found another bike for $800 that was completely built up with SRAM Rival, Neuvation Wheels, Selle Italia Saddle, but a crappy frame. Cannibalized the crappy framed bike and there you have it, a $2500+ for $1550. Ebay can be a great place to find bikes.

                 

                  http://www.performancebike.com/bikes/Product_10052_10551_1078841_-1_400306_400001_400470

                   

                  Does anyone know anything about GT Bikes? No one in my area carries them and this is a great deal...

                  I don't half-ass anything

                   

                  "I have several close friends who have run marathons, a word that is actually derived from two Swahili words: mara, which means 'to die a horrible death' and thon, which means 'for a stupid T-shirt.' Look it up." - Celia Rivenbark, You Can't Drink All Day if You Don't Start in the Morning

                   

                    http://www.performancebike.com/bikes/Product_10052_10551_1078841_-1_400306_400001_400470

                     

                    Does anyone know anything about GT Bikes? No one in my area carries them and this is a great deal...

                    GT is a brand that has been traded a few times in the last 10-15 years so I have no idea about the current stuff. The frames are probably made alongside many other brands in the same Taiwanese or Chinese factory, which isn't necessarily a bad thing. The overall specs are better than the bike's direct bike, especially the wheels and cranks. At these prices there will always be some sort of tradeoff but that's got to be ok. The compact geometry might provide more fit adjustability but they only have the bike in large, which I don't think you are.

                      but they only have the bike in large, which I don't think you are.

                      Yeah, I didn't realize that earlier. Cry

                      I'm about to just say to hell with it, get a lower end bike and get one from a LBS or REI. If I need to upgrade in another year, I'll let DH be the one to kick himself. It's one of those things where I have to show that I will, in fact, get our money's worth out of it and not let it be a dust collector in the garage.

                      I don't half-ass anything

                       

                      "I have several close friends who have run marathons, a word that is actually derived from two Swahili words: mara, which means 'to die a horrible death' and thon, which means 'for a stupid T-shirt.' Look it up." - Celia Rivenbark, You Can't Drink All Day if You Don't Start in the Morning

                       

                        Yeah, that GT bike is actually decent. Just like xhristopher said most frames are produced in the same factory, so the quality of the frame from one manufacturer to another is generally the same. The only concern to have with many of these bikes is how well it is put together, but that is what the LBS is for. Bring it in for a tune-up/check-up and everything should be fine.

                         

                        The other thing I would say is that it is worth just taking your time and get a good deal on a good bike.

                         


                        Needs more cowbell!

                          Yeah, I didn't realize that earlier. Cry

                          I'm about to just say to hell with it, get a lower end bike and get one from a LBS or REI. If I need to upgrade in another year, I'll let DH be the one to kick himself. It's one of those things where I have to show that I will, in fact, get our money's worth out of it and not let it be a dust collector in the garage.

                           

                          If you get a frame that fits you really well (which is a LOT more likely if you work with a LBS) and don't spend a fortune, then in a year or two it wouldn't be difficult to justify a new groupset.  The difference between a $1000 bike and a $1500 bike is often just a different color and components, but identical frame.  You might even find a deal on a 105 set if you look for an older version.  Nashbar.com and RealCyclist.com are good places to watch for closeout component sets.  The only downside would be that you'd have to swap everything out yourself.  I doubt any shop would install components purchased elsewhere.  But it's not something that can't be learned.

                          I shoot pretty things! ~

                          '14 Goals:

                          • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

                          • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

                            I just went through the whole bike buying process myself this fall. And trust me it took me months to finally get happy. I am a very stingy person and was new to road bikes, but I needed to get something for an upcoming triathlon. My suggestion is don't buy anything from Wal-Mart or any big box store. Stay away from bikesdirect.com, and go to your all your LBS. I bought a bike from Wal-Mart and sold it on craigslist after 2 rides. Then I bought a bike of bikesdirect. I spent $200 bucks trying to get the bike shop to assemble it properly and make adjustments. Every time you bring the bike it's another 1 hour charge. You have to understand that bike companies only allow one bike shop per region. So you won't be able to go to one shop and try out every time of bike. I went and tried bikes from 7 different bike shops (2 bikes per shop). It will help you decide if the difference in the components is worth the extra money to you. Finally I tried all the different bikes. Cannondale, Specialized, Trek, Jamis, Fuji, Giant, etc, etc.... What I realized is that all these companies make bikes at price points and they are all very similar at that price point. At the $700 to $800 you will get a basic road bike with Shimano components either Sora or 2200 (make sure the bike has a carbon fork and seat post because that will eliminate a ton of road vibration you feel in your butt and hands). Both Sora and 2200 will require you to use your thumbs and index fingers to shift. Next price point is $800 to $1000 which bumps you up to Shimano Tiagra components (best buy for the money because it puts all the shifting, up and down, in your middle and index fingers). Last component set I would recommend is the Shimano 105 $1,000 to $1,400. Same shifter positions as the Tiagra but this component set features different crank set options (Double & Triple) and it built for customization later on. Double offers less gears options but makes the bike weigh less and thus faster. It makes hill climbing a lot harder but often the people getting a double crank set wouldn’t go lower than the middle ring anyway. I hope this helps you understand the components. From what I saw all the frames were about the same at the different price points. A $700 Cannondale is going to feel about as light as a $700 Trek. A couple other things to note: 1. This is the best time of year to buy a bike as most of the shops are trying to get rid of their 2010 stuff and make room for the 2011 stuff. They also aren’t doing a whole lot of business because the weather is bad and people don’t ride in bad weather. 2. Never ride a bike without riding it first. There are very subtle differences in bikes. Some you might notice some you might now. (i.e. the factory seat on one might not fit you as well as it does others) 3. Craigslist is an amazing source for buying bikes. Especially the larger city you are in. Just know what components you are looking for. You can do this by trying out bikes in a LBS and figuring out if the difference in the components is worth it to you. Plus you get to try out a bike before you buy and there is room for negotiation on the price of the bike. Just last week I saw some lady put her ex-husbands $1,600 bike on craigslist for $150. I bought it and sold it two days later for $700. 4. Don’t short sell the relationship with your LBS. Even though I didn’t buy my bike from them I still buy a lot of stuff from my LBS and when it’s time for small adjustments, free fittings, and other small stuff they remember that I bought my bike pump and a pair of shorts from them. 5. Stick with name brand bikes. They are easier to resell or trade.

                            "It's a must that you outwork your competition today! Think training is hard? Try losing!" Eric Thomas

                              Here is a picture of my bike. I paid $500 bucks for it on craiglist but it retailed for $1,275. The only reason I felt comfortable buying it off of craigslist is I rode at least 14 different bikes before this one and knew what I was looking for in terms of feel of the bike and components.

                               

                              "It's a must that you outwork your competition today! Think training is hard? Try losing!" Eric Thomas


                              Needs more cowbell!

                                Wow, Danny...you scored big time on that deal...NICE!

                                I shoot pretty things! ~

                                '14 Goals:

                                • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

                                • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)