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Pacing for strides? (Read 142 times)


Queen of 3rd Place

    In the Running-wizard program I came across the instructions to "Run 3 x 150 meter (approx) stride-outs (slightly faster than your fastest aerobic pace)" after doing hill repeats. What is "slightly faster than your fastest aerobic pace"? I've always tried to do them so that I accelerate to as fast as I can go and keep good form. 

    Ex runner

    JML


      I am also on a Running Wizard plan and follow the same approach that I used for strides with other running plans.  I accelerate up to a pace that feels comfortably hard where I still feel loose and not like I am forcing the pace.  After holding the harder pace for a bit, I back off the pace and slowly transition back to jogging pace.  The keys for me are not allowing myself to get tight trying to push it and making sure that the transitions from slow to fast to slow are smooth and easy.  I don't ever have a specific pace in mind for strides.....I just run them by feel.

       2014 goals: run a bunch....race some.....repeat...

         I've always tried to do them so that I accelerate to as fast as I can go and keep good form. 

         

        Sounds good, keep doing that.

        Runners run.


        I'm back!

           Sounds good, keep doing that.

           

          +1. I believe Pfitzinger's instructions are smoothly accelerate to top speed for 70m, then float at that, maintaining form, the last 30.

            In the Running-wizard program I came across the instructions to "Run 3 x 150 meter (approx) stride-outs (slightly faster than your fastest aerobic pace)" after doing hill repeats. What is "slightly faster than your fastest aerobic pace"? I've always tried to do them so that I accelerate to as fast as I can go and keep good form. 

            Arla:

             

            During the hill training, you don't want to go really fast.  It's not that time yet.  At that point, you just want to get your body used to running a bit faster than up until now.  So that means; if you've been doing your tempo run (Out & Back) at, say, 8-minute pace, then you want your strides at the bottom of your hill circuit to be about 7-7:30 pace.  Sure, it's not that fast at all and not that much at all.  But your time to go faster will come.  This is just to get used to it.  Don't try to cram in everything at once.  When you climb up the ladder, you take one step at a time.  You don't all of a sudden reach out and get your foot on the top step.  Go one step at a time and Running Wizard will walk you through it. ;o)

              PS: And later on, you'll have a workout called "Cut-Downs".  This one, you'll be doing 3 X (3 X 100m).  With this workout, each set, you'll be doing 3 X 100m faster and faster (not within the set; in other words, you might do the first 3 X 100m at 5k pace, then next set of 3 X 100m at a mile pace; then the last set of 3 X 100m at almost 400m race pace).  So progressively you get faster and faster.  You don't want to do that much fast runs right from the get-go.  You wait till you're actually ready to blast out.  Of course, a workout like 50/50 should be done almost full-sprint.  By then, you should be strong enough that you won't have pulled muscles and things like that.


              Queen of 3rd Place

                Thanks, Nobby! Slilghtly fast than tempo pace is quite a bit slower than I've been doing them. Sounds like I need to think of them as just being a way to stretch out the legs.

                Ex runner