12

My running "plan" (Read 250 times)

    I've posted before about how I was trying to find an "optimum" mileage . I'm nearly 20 and I've heard that if you're already reasonably developed as a guy, things start to slowly go downhill physically starting about 20-21. I'm nearly done growing, and for that reason, I'm thinking that what I should basically do is simply run as much as I can. It's pre-emptive; I have friends who are about 25 and say they stopped exercising around senior year of high school and how it was a huge mistake. I averaged my archived running data over the past 4 years and found that I averaged about 8:00 pace, which seems fine to me, as I'm not necessarily concerned about being fast. I've read studies that claim that anything beyond 20 mpw is actually harming your heart....I guess when I drop dead I'll start to worry.

     

    I currently run at least 5 miles a day, and I run every day if possible. Now I don't want to blow out my knees while young -- I've learned over the years that HOW you run also can drastically affect whether you get injured at a given mileage or not. Elegance in form seems important. I currently keep an offline running log, not as intuitive as RA's, just recording distance, time, and day.

     

    Is it a bad idea for me to not intentionally try or train to get competitive times? My concerns are honestly just more for heart health and weight control. If I run faster occasionally, I'm fine with that too. I sure do get ribbed by the track jocks on campus though...

     

    Thoughts? And thanks in advance for the help.

     

    Dave

      I think you think too much.

       

      I'm more than 2x your age, I run 3x the mileage you do and I do hard workouts every week. Your knees won't fall off. Things don't start going downhill physically at 20 or 21 unless you want them to.

       

      Just run, baby.

      Runners run.

        I think you think too much.

         

        I'm more than 2x your age, I run 3x the mileage you do and I do hard workouts every week. Your knees won't fall off. Things don't start going downhill physically at 20 or 21 unless you want them to.

         

        Just run, baby.

        Well dang, that's pretty cool. Like I said though, I don't really want or need to become bad-ass. as in winning races or doing intensive speed workouts every week. When it comes right down to it, I don't really care as long as I'm using my bod and getting something mentally out of it.

         

        I didn't mean that you hit 20-21 and then BANG your body goes to hell, I meant that it's around that age that you start to stop having the luxury of a body that's still growing and developing.

         

        I do what I do now so that I don't have to first eff up and then run later in life because I have to, like a lot of folks I know. There seems to be a logarhythmic decay factor that happens to 99% of the population after high school. I just care about keeping myself out of reach of that curve.

          So then what's the question? If you do any kind of running--or really anything--on a regular basis you'll be way ahead of 98% of the population.

          Runners run.

            So then what's the question? If you do any kind of running--or really anything--on a regular basis you'll be way ahead of 98% of the population.

            I was just looking for affirmation from someone else who hopefully knows more than I do about running; like I've said, I don't have much knowledge of the nuts and bolts of it. Believe me, I'm not an overly-deep thinker, I'm probably one of the most ADHD people I know.


            day after day sameness

              I was just looking for affirmation from someone else who hopefully knows more than I do about running; like I've said, I don't have much knowledge of the nuts and bolts of it. Believe me, I'm not an overly-deep thinker, I'm probably one of the most ADHD people I know.

               

              The American College of Sports Medicine recommends about 30 minutes of moderate exercise most days of the week; here are its guidelines.

               

              So your running 5 easy miles most days seems line up well with that recommendation. Add some strength conditioning every few days and it would seem you've got a good approach to beating back the sedentary lifestyle's impact.

              Choosing my words carefully has never been my strength I've been known to be vague and often pointless

              prideandjoy5


                I am twice your age and since I was 17 I have exercised, stopped all exercise, started lifting weights to gain muscle, stopped lifting and started running, stopped most exercise, and started running again mostly for distance.

                 

                The only thing I will say age has done has made it more challenging to start again once you stop.  Like mikeymike said, just run if that's what you want to do.

                  Well dang, that's pretty cool. Like I said though, I don't really want or need to become bad-ass. as in winning races or doing intensive speed workouts every week. When it comes right down to it, I don't really care as long as I'm using my bod and getting something mentally out of it.

                   

                  I didn't mean that you hit 20-21 and then BANG your body goes to hell, I meant that it's around that age that you start to stop having the luxury of a body that's still growing and developing.

                   

                  I do what I do now so that I don't have to first eff up and then run later in life because I have to, like a lot of folks I know. There seems to be a logarhythmic decay factor that happens to 99% of the population after high school. I just care about keeping myself out of reach of that curve.

                   

                  You are probably going to eff up a few things in life.  Everyone does.  You learn to get back on your feet and keep trying.  The decay from not running is reversible.  If you find yourself fat and out of shape in the future, you can do something about it.

                     

                    You are probably going to eff up a few things in life.  Everyone does.  You learn to get back on your feet and keep trying.  The decay from not running is reversible.  If you find yourself fat and out of shape in the future, you can do something about it.

                    Yes, but ideally I could avoid effing up in the first place 

                      Life isn't living if you don't eff it up. Find yr passion man.


                      The Irreverent Reverand

                        I've heard that if you're already reasonably developed as a guy, things start to slowly go downhill physically starting about 20-21.

                         

                        Oh shit. Have you heard anything about what happens at age 39? 

                         

                        If you want to keep some moderate level of exercise, go run 5 miles 4-5 times a week and you'll be just fine. I was a very fast high school runner, stopped, and didn't resume running for 17 years - after gaining all kinds of weight. You don't want to do that. Don't worry about any downhill slide in the next year or two.

                         

                        But ... find that thing you like. I have a friend for whom basketball leagues at the Y are his thing. For other friends it is cycling. For me it is running. For others it is aerobic and general fitness workouts. Whatever it is, find what you love and do it. I wish I had when I was your age.

                        Husband. Father of three. Lutheran pastor. National Guardsman. Runner. Political junkie. Baseball fan.

                         

                        Goals for 2014:

                        Sub-3:30 marathon; run for a year free from major injuries or interruptions

                        PRs: 3:27 marathon; 1:41 half; 45:07 10K; 23:26 5K; 6:02 mile; <12 parsecs Kessel Run


                        Sultan of slug

                           if you're already reasonably developed as a guy, things start to slowly go downhill physically starting about 20-21.

                           

                          Take solace in the fact that very few elite distance runners are that young (though there have been plenty of exceptions in the past few years).

                           

                          The statement might be true, contingent upon the clause, "if you're already reasonably developed." The problem is that being "reasonably developed" aerobically takes years and years and years, so for the vast majority of people (even elites), aerobic gains from training will outstrip any increasing disadvantages that the extra years bring.

                           

                          It seems like this equation stops working for elites sometime in their early- to mid-30s. Most of us mere mortals are still underdeveloped enough aerobically that we don't have to worry about "working harder and harder only to get slower and slower" until we're much older. Hooray for being out of shape in your prime years!

                             

                            Take solace in the fact that very few elite distance runners are that young (though there have been plenty of exceptions in the past few years).

                             

                            The statement might be true, contingent upon the clause, "if you're already reasonably developed." The problem is that being "reasonably developed" aerobically takes years and years and years, so for the vast majority of people (even elites), aerobic gains from training will outstrip any increasing disadvantages that the extra years bring.

                             

                            It seems like this equation stops working for elites sometime in their early- to mid-30s. Most of us mere mortals are still underdeveloped enough aerobically that we don't have to worry about "working harder and harder only to get slower and slower" until we're much older. Hooray for being out of shape in your prime years!

                             

                            Oh, I was referring to being developed in terms of actual physical maturity. That said, it could be very possible that I get into a better regimen now at 19, stick with it and end up being in better shape at 21 than when I was 17. I was something of a late bloomer as well, which leads me to conclude that I might be able to squeeze out a couple extra "prime" years if I really want to. I intend to !


                            Feeling the growl again

                              I've posted before about how I was trying to find an "optimum" mileage . I'm nearly 20 and I've heard that if you're already reasonably developed as a guy, things start to slowly go downhill physically starting about 20-21. 

                               

                               

                              Guys get into college (or jobs), stop having easy access to regular, organized sports.  Then they spend too much time in a chair, eat to much, drink too much, and get lazy without someone with authority to tell them to drop and give 20 or run four laps.

                               

                              That, in a nutshell, is why you see guys go physically downhill in their early 20s.   It has absolutely nothing to do with biology and is anything but inevitable.

                               

                              I started running regularly at age 12 and ran progressively more and more and did not peak until I was age 28.  Even then, my decline was more a factor of diverting my attention to other things (career, kids) than biology.

                               

                              Once you get into your 30s you do start noticing that it takes longer to recover, you begin to lose your edge in agility and speed, and your metabolism slows down.  So make the most out of the next decade of your life.

                               

                              If you like running for health, than by all means just run.  There is more to running than races.  Just do what makes you happy and if it keeps you running regularly and maintains your health, what can be wrong with that?

                              "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                               

                                Ed Whitlock might be a good reference for age and running.

                                12