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Snow running (Read 149 times)

    Thinking about buying a new pair of runners with Gore-tex for running snowy trails and roads.  Thoughts?  Are they worth the money? Will they keep my feet fairly dry? Or are they just a gimmick?


    Latent Runner

      I didn't bother with shoes, I moved right up to snowshoes:

      Your feet stay reasonably dry and WOW do you get a workout; a five mile run feels like an easy ten.  Smile

      Fat old man PRs:

      • 1-mile (point to point, gravity assist): 5:50
      • 2-mile: 13:49
      • 5K (gravity assist last mile): 21:31
      • 5-Mile: 37:24
      • 10K (first 10K of my Half Marathon): 48:16
      • 10-Mile (first 10 miles of my Half Marathon): 1:17:40
      • Half Marathon: 1:42:13

        I am asking for show shoes for Christmas.Big grin

          My experience has been that gore tex shoes do a better job of keeping water in than out. And I ran in snowshoes, which is hard and maybe you should do for the experience of it, at least on ungroomed areas. Running in snowshoes on groomed trails I think is ridiculous.. trail shoes handle the terrain just fine, and the whole racing snowshoe thing is a conceit. What I recommend is to get wool socks, regular trail shoes with big lugs on em, and gaiters if you want and just go to town. Spend some serious time breaking trail and you'll be in the best shape of your life - and as long as you stay moving your feet won't freeze.

           

          I should mention that my opinions apply to my area, so up to about 3 feet of snow and about 10 below 0F temp-wise.

          1/24 - Beast of Burden 50

            Goretex may keep your feet dry until they start sweating or slush / water comes over the top, in which case your feet may be very wet - then cold if you have some delays getting back to car / home. Goretex shoes tend to be heavier and stiffer, not to mention pricier, from what I've been told. I just use my regular shoes, but generally the wider ones with more space for heavy socks. Don't constrict circulation with socks too heavy for your shoes.

             

            Dion snowshoes are a lot of fun when you have enough snow to warrant them. They can be a lot of work. I'll use Kahtoola microspikes when there's packed snow and no need for flotation of snowshoes. And ice joggers / studs / screw shoes when it's icier.

             

            I usually wear smartwool socks, but occasionally use neoprene, when my feet may eventually sweat, even at -10F or colder after 4-5 hrs. What I've found works for me are the neoprene overbooties (Crescent Moon or some biking shops) - not sealed like neoprene socks so breathable in places, provides more insulation (nice when below 0F in lots of snow) and some cushion between bindings (snowshoes or microspikes) and shoes. I don't usually use gaitors since the overbooties serve that purpose for shallow snow.

            "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog


            Latent Runner

              ...and the whole racing snowshoe thing is a conceit...

               

              Seriously?  What brought you to that conclusion?

              Fat old man PRs:

              • 1-mile (point to point, gravity assist): 5:50
              • 2-mile: 13:49
              • 5K (gravity assist last mile): 21:31
              • 5-Mile: 37:24
              • 10K (first 10K of my Half Marathon): 48:16
              • 10-Mile (first 10 miles of my Half Marathon): 1:17:40
              • Half Marathon: 1:42:13

                Perhaps it was just my experience, which was this: racing snowshoes have a very small 'footprint' so as to make running in them as fast and natural as possible, and which makes them poor at being snowshoes on any terrain except groomed trails where trail shoes will do just as well. Imo, racing snowshoes may look like snowshoes, but they fail to function like snowshoes except in conditions where snowshoes aren't really required(except by the rules of the race).

                1/24 - Beast of Burden 50


                Latent Runner

                  Perhaps it was just my experience, which was this: racing snowshoes have a very small 'footprint' so as to make running in them as fast and natural as possible, and which makes them poor at being snowshoes on any terrain except groomed trails where trail shoes will do just as well. Imo, racing snowshoes may look like snowshoes, but they fail to function like snowshoes except in conditions where snowshoes aren't really required(except by the rules of the race).

                   

                  You are of course welcome to your opinion, but after training and racing in them last winter, I see very little merit to your statements.

                  Fat old man PRs:

                  • 1-mile (point to point, gravity assist): 5:50
                  • 2-mile: 13:49
                  • 5K (gravity assist last mile): 21:31
                  • 5-Mile: 37:24
                  • 10K (first 10K of my Half Marathon): 48:16
                  • 10-Mile (first 10 miles of my Half Marathon): 1:17:40
                  • Half Marathon: 1:42:13

                    lol. Right on.

                    1/24 - Beast of Burden 50

                      I think the answer depends on how much snow, and how cold.

                       

                      The gore-tex running shoe is a great idea. I bought a brand that was close, but not actually gore-tex. The waterproofness only lasted a few weeks. Gore-tex can leak eventually but is usually pretty good. I have one gore-tex hiking boots that leak after a couple years of staying dry. Another pair that doesn't leak.

                       

                      Even the ones that leak are water resistant, and are surely a good barrier against cold wind. But then again, plain shoes getting wet may not bother you much during a warmed up run, when above freezing.


                      Feeling the growl again

                        In college, average winter temps were below zero to single digits. during December-February.  300 inches of snow per year, on average.  We often did challenging runs through knee to waist-deep snow, and even on the roads it was usually 6 inches of frozen slush or loose, greasy snow.  None of us wore anything but regular running shoes.  Unless you're doing ultra training of 3+ hours or may end up standing around, I'm not sure why you would need anything else.

                        "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                         

                          Thank  you for all the replies. I figured they were not worth it. I have been running in the winter for a couple of years with no problem so I don't need to spend money on shoes that are not needed.  We just had some very slushy roads the last few days and was wondering.  Of course I stopped in at my LRS and was browsing the shoe selection.

                          I appreciate the information.


                          an amazing likeness

                            From my experience, Corrina -- the primary need is to keep snow from building around your ankles and then melting from your body heat. Whether that means gaiters, or how your pants lie, or whatever...

                            Choosing my words carefully has never been my strength I've been known to be vague and often pointless

                              I don't mind the snow so much - it's the ice on the roads that gets to me.  Yaktrax Pros break too quickly.  I'm trying some different ice grippers this year.  Last year I wimped out and didn't run much outside.


                              Cheap and Evil Girl

                                I really like the "winterized" running shoes.  Montrail makes an "Outdry" version of some of their models and I find that it helps to keep my feet warmer by keeping the cold wind off my toes.

                                 

                                i just bought a pair of Gore tex North Face brand running shoes and so far I really like them, of course I have not yet had a chance to run with them in the snow.

                                 

                                +1 on gaiters.  They go a long way toward helping to keep your feet dry in snow.  Dry is the most important part of keeping warm in the winter.

                                I HAVE NO IDEA WHAT I AM DOING.  

                                 

                                "Mental toughness is built by doing something that is hard over and over again, especially when you don't feel like doing it. Our society has conditioned us to believe that there should be no discomfort, to stop when we are uncomfortable. But the discomfort we feel when we're doing a challenging workout is an important part of the strengthening process." -Jim Afremow, The Champion's Mind: How Great Athletes Think, Train, and Thrive

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