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How much money is typically raised for a charity in a 5k race? (Read 1209 times)

    I am trying to find a fun way to raise money for the non-profit band my kids are in, so I'm wondering if someone organized a 5K, how much money could we expect to be raised the first year?

    "We are not talking about gorse-bushes," said Owl crossly. "I am," said Pooh.

      I don't know how universal this is but, up here we have a great race timing company, Pretzel City Sports, that provides timing and organization for a lot of charity races every year.  If there is a similar business in your area you might try contacting them.  If you don't know what company(s) do this type of thing in your area try contacting the local running club, I'm sure they will.

       

      mta:  In addition to helping you set up and time the race these companies often have access the the most important resource, the local runners.  Even if you are putting on a great event you have to market it somewhere.  Up here PCS sends out a weekly email to all the runners in the area about upcoming events which is a great way to get people to know about yours.

      Whatever my lot, thou hast taught me to say, It is well, it is well with my soul.


      A Dance with Monkeys

        Usually, the funds raised come from the sponsor dollars while registration fees cover costs.

         

        So. How good a fundraiser are you?

          Trent is right on that the money comes from sponsors and not so much race fees or even donated services. The direct ask is best and will yield the most money.

           

          One of the local 5ks here in Western, MA started off with just 200 runners or so eight years ago and raised less than $15,000, now it's a decent money maker for the recipient non-profit organization raising more than $135,000 this year. Here's a link to the race website---click on "race history" to get a sense of net revenue/profits in the first year 

           

          http://safepass.org/HCR/


          A Dance with Monkeys

            Local race I help with is a fund raiser for a charity clinic. Last year there were 500 runners. Fundraising / sponsorship efforts raised $20k.

              HA!  I'm a horrible fund-raiser, but there are more people in the group than just me, and some are natural salesmen.  If we could raise at least $5000 the first year, that would be great.  That would be enough to purchase a high-ticket instrument and offer a few scholarships.

               

              Any websites or advice on how to make this happen?

               

              J

              "We are not talking about gorse-bushes," said Owl crossly. "I am," said Pooh.

                A couple of tips from watching friends' try to organize a charity event.

                 

                * Make sure you set up a bank account to keep any money/expenses/bills separate from your own personal accounts, even if your event isn't a big one.

                * Create a letter with all your information and key details to use for approaching possible sponsors/help.

                 

                Good luck! Smile

                "Don't feel like running today...suck it up and run ...you're an athlete." (John Stanton, founder & owner of The Running Room)

                 

                Three half marathons later, I got a number. Half Fanatic #9292. :)

                  You might try this as a resource

                   

                  http://www.racedirectorresource.com/

                   

                  Is there a running club or two in your area? I am on the board of a local running club here and we are often approached by organizations for help. We rarely say no and will provide timing, race numbers, volunteers, registration assistance etc especially when the group is a non-profit. Plus we can get the word out on our on-line bulletin board and will often volunteer to post race information on all appropriate web sites.

                   

                  A running shoe specialty store will often help as well---not the big chain stores, but check out a local running shoe/apparel store and you can frequently get advice and sponsorship support there.