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Lose weight for half marathon (Read 2671 times)

e454545rt


    I did something crazy tonight. I signed up for a half marathon in October. I'm new to running and am about to enter week 5 of C25K. I'm very over weight (243 lbs) and am trying to figure out this running thing. 

     

    Is it crazy that I signed up for a such a long distance? I figured that it would serve as motivation to lose this weight, because if I don't do it, I'll completely embarrass myself come race day. I think 7 months is enough time to drop 50 or so pounds. I'm going to see C25K through to the end so that will at least be a start. I ran my first 5k on New Year's Day and was immediately addicted to running. Leading up to the half in October, I signed up for a Mother's Day 5k race, a Father's Day 5k race, and a September 10k. I figured I should at least experience a variety of races before the big event. 

     

    I'm not really sure what I'm asking here. I guess I'm just trying to see if what I am doing isn't a good idea. As far as my goal is concerned, it really is to just complete the race. I want to give it my all, but since I am so new to running I have no clue as to what time to shoot for. I figured I could just spend this time while I lose weight enjoying my new hobby and worry about speed work as time goes on...

      Not sure what to say other than running is good for losing weight and you are not alone. I've lost over 50 lbs but it took closer to two years. I'd say if your losing weight consistently but don't hit 50 by the fall don't worry about it so long as you keep trending in the right direction and are able to enjoy the running.

      e454545rt


        I guess what I'm asking is if it's a bad idea to shoot for a longer distance like that when first starting out, or if the general consensus is to just go for it.

         

        That's awesome that you lost that weight! I can't wait to hit my goal. I think overall I'd like to be at 180 lbs.


        Intentionally Blank

          I see no reason why you couldn't complete a half marathon in October, as long as you remain uninjured.  Just stay healthy.  It's a good goal. 

          xor


            10k to half marathon, yes.  Just take it easy and enjoy your running.

             

            Try not to get sucked into the full marathon hysteria bandwagon.  Yet.  Let nature take its course and enjoy what you can do.

             

            A half marathon is a very worthy... and very achievable, given time... goal.

             

            e454545rt


              Thanks guys. Last year I got into running a little and did too much too early and got injured. So this time around I'm starting off with C25K and just trying to take it one day at a time. I think as long as I progress as time goes on I'll be fine. Just gotta remember that at my weight there is more stress on the body during running.

                I was on a similar schedule when I stated running a few years ago. I started running in jan, did a 5k in april, and finished the half in october. I agree with many of the others, the key is not getting hurt. Just ramping up the distance slowly, eating well, and listening to your body when it tells you to back off a bit. Remember, it will get easier as you drop weight. More importantly, you can keep coming back here for encouragement!

                  I weigh a little over 40 lbs more than you and I've run several of them.  I am running a full (which I have previously run two of) on the same day you are running your half.

                   

                   

                  Consistency above all.  Distance above speed.

                   

                  Walk breaks are fine.

                   

                  Avoid superstar workouts.  If you want to increase your pace, you can (for now) make much more and faster progress in the kitchen (or more appropriately, by staying out of the kitchen) than you can on the road.

                   

                  It is easy to be committed for the time you are exercising.  That requires ~30mins to 3hrs of commitment per day.  It is more difficult to be committed to your diet.  That requires 24 hours of commitment per day.

                   

                  Do not neglect recovery from longer efforts.  It is preferable to eat 400-600 bonus calories immediately after a big run, than be starving all day and either not recover, or gorge yourself later.

                   

                  Learn what tends to give you trouble in the injury department and take care of it before it becomes a problem.  For me it is achilles/plantar and I have to basically treat my calf muscles like royalty.  But as long as I keep it up and train consistently and don't do anything stupid, I'm usually fine.

                  CyclingAHEAD until 2012


                  xor


                    I very much like the previous post (though not fb like).

                     

                    e454545rt


                      I weigh a little over 40 lbs more than you and I've run several of them.  I am running a full (which I have previously run two of) on the same day you are running your half.

                       

                       

                      Consistency above all.  Distance above speed.

                       

                      Walk breaks are fine.

                       

                      Avoid superstar workouts.  If you want to increase your pace, you can (for now) make much more and faster progress in the kitchen (or more appropriately, by staying out of the kitchen) than you can on the road.

                       

                      It is easy to be committed for the time you are exercising.  That requires ~30mins to 3hrs of commitment per day.  It is more difficult to be committed to your diet.  That requires 24 hours of commitment per day.

                       

                      Do not neglect recovery from longer efforts.  It is preferable to eat 400-600 bonus calories immediately after a big run, than be starving all day and either not recover, or gorge yourself later.

                       

                      Learn what tends to give you trouble in the injury department and take care of it before it becomes a problem.  For me it is achilles/plantar and I have to basically treat my calf muscles like royalty.  But as long as I keep it up and train consistently and don't do anything stupid, I'm usually fine.

                       

                      Thank you very much for the advice! Very inspiring to hear that you have accomplished all that. Since I'm new to this, I really had no clue what my expectations could/should be. I've started tracking my caloric intake and am trying to eat healthier foods. I naturally eat more when I workout a lot. It's like I become ravenous and have to eat more. It's weird. I guess the body knows what it wants.

                       

                      My calf muscles tighten up pretty quickly when jogging/running. I just purchased some compression socks so I'm hoping that helps. A lot of the times that I start walking it's not because I have to from a cardio standpoint, but more because my calf muscles tighten up. Although I recently changed shoes and am focusing on landing flat on my feet instead of towards the front which seems to be helping.

                       

                      I definitely agree with the distance over speed idea. Right now I'm trying to push myself farther and farther, and will worry about the faster part later.

                        I also am a fan of calf compression gear (I use the sleeves rather than the socks though ... only because I am OCD about running socks).

                         

                         

                        Wanting to eat after a big workout is normal, and not necessarily a bad thing, as long as you keep it in control.

                         

                         

                         

                         

                        With regards to injury, demotivation, or whatever -- with running, there will be setbacks.  A lot of new runners get very excited about running and then quit at the first setback.   But the trick to being a successful runner is making sure that the number of go forwards is greater than the number of setbacks.  That's really all you need to win.

                        CyclingAHEAD until 2012


                        DoppleBock


                          I started @ 6'2 and 300lbs+

                           

                          If you are committed 3# a week is realistic 

                           

                          I would try and not go crazy with the running - But to drop 3# a week or even 2# a week consistently you need to ramp up you activities - So keep following you currenly plan + play with your kids - Go for brisk 30-60 minute walks.  Sitting on our asses watching TV is the enemy.  If you are going to watch 30-60 minutes of TV - a great time to work on your core.

                           

                          Generally a male weighing 240 with a fair metabolis will have a base metabolic rate to burn @ 2,200 calories.  Take 130 calories per mile of running and walking.  Maybe get 400 calories per hour for aggressively playing with your kids.  Or whatever for bikeriding - rollerblading - frisbee etc.

                           

                          I have like the mentality of eating up to your base metabolic rate and excercising for weight loss.  So eating an average of  2200 calories per day and let the activities in your life drive the 2-3# per week.

                           

                          I think you general plan is good

                           

                          Just remember the #1 sin of most new runners - They try and make every day a race with themselves.  They tend to run too hard or too fast.  Most runs should be easy pace.  Once a week you can run hard and once a week maybe longer.  Keep pushing the longer.

                           

                          Enjoy.

                           

                          I did something crazy tonight. I signed up for a half marathon in October. I'm new to running and am about to enter week 5 of C25K. I'm very over weight (243 lbs) and am trying to figure out this running thing. 

                           

                          Is it crazy that I signed up for a such a long distance? I figured that it would serve as motivation to lose this weight, because if I don't do it, I'll completely embarrass myself come race day. I think 7 months is enough time to drop 50 or so pounds. I'm going to see C25K through to the end so that will at least be a start. I ran my first 5k on New Year's Day and was immediately addicted to running. Leading up to the half in October, I signed up for a Mother's Day 5k race, a Father's Day 5k race, and a September 10k. I figured I should at least experience a variety of races before the big event. 

                           

                          I'm not really sure what I'm asking here. I guess I'm just trying to see if what I am doing isn't a good idea. As far as my goal is concerned, it really is to just complete the race. I want to give it my all, but since I am so new to running I have no clue as to what time to shoot for. I figured I could just spend this time while I lose weight enjoying my new hobby and worry about speed work as time goes on...

                          http://a-big-horse.blogspot.com/ 

                          2013 Goals ~ Mar < 3:00, 5M < 29, 10k < 35  

                           

                            All I'll say is don't get discouraged with a few aches and pains, they are normal as you get used to this running thing.  

                             

                            At various points I was convinced I had runners knee, Achilles Tendinitis, Piriformis Syndrome, Pulled hamstrings etc.  Most times one can run through these, but sometimes it can be a real injury coming on,  distinguishing between the two could be more art than Science.  If moving or running for a while makes the pain go away, its most likely some growing pains.  a sharp localized pain or one that gets worse as you run on the other hand needs caution.

                            DoppleBock


                              It is good to get some calories right after running - Something with a 4-2-1 ratio of Carbs - Protein - Fat.  1% chocolate milk is a good example.  Slimfast or ensure (certain types) works well.  Nothing crazy 200-300 calories.  At minimum I would do this after running hard or long.

                               

                              Muscle soreness is often magnified by de-hydration - Make sure you are drinking ample h20

                               

                               Active recover is great for reducing soreness.  Run in the morning - Throw in a lunch time or after work walk or some activity to get the blood flowing to heal the muscles.

                              http://a-big-horse.blogspot.com/ 

                              2013 Goals ~ Mar < 3:00, 5M < 29, 10k < 35  

                               

                                Having recently gone through this (50+ lbs lost so far) I'll also add a few more things that I've learned.

                                 

                                Weight loss isn't always linear. Sometimes you'll stall out for no apparent reason and then resume for no apparent reason so don't get discouraged and worry about what's happening day to day or even week to week. Just keep plugging away. As you go through these cycles of weigh loss you'll start to be able to "feel" when it's working and just intuitively know your on the right track.

                                 

                                It's also been said that you burn the same number of calories by running a mile in 6 minutes as you would in 12. Therefore focus on going easy and staying healthy, and gradually increasing your distance and running frequency, not running hard or longer than your ready for. If you do anything that keeps you from your next scheduled workout it's counter to your goal. There will be plenty of time to run fast/longer later.

                                 

                                One interesting thing I learned while losing weight by running is that my shoe needs kept changing. What worked for me at 220 wasn't good for me at 180. Be mindful of this.

                                 

                                I'll put in a good word for calorie counting. Last June I stalled out at 180 and was content but six weeks ago, wanting to get faster, I started counting calories and actually trying a diet. Since I've lost about 8 lbs. With a little extra strategy I see no reason why you couldn't easily lose faster than I did.

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