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Super week (Read 183 times)

    I took a week off from work and am thinking of doing a "super week" in which I would increase subtantially my mileage.

    My weekly mileage is about 50k right now. My top weekly mileage is about 75km. I did a few 70-75km weeks last summer. So I'm wondering if a 90-100km week would be a good idea. It would be good for motivation as it would be an achievement for me. But in the overall picture, I don't know.

    And if the "super week" is a good idea, I'm not sure if I should cut down on the intervals for the week or keep the planned workouts and just add easy mileage.

    Additional info. I have a 10k race planned for May 3rd.

     

    Your thoughts, suggestions, ideas would be appreciated. Thank you.


    The Rep

      Hello-

      Typically you would increase mileage because you had a planned schedule.  Normal increases adding to the long run first to avoid extra chance of injury.  Going from 50K (30+ miles) to 100K (62+ miles) in one week would usually be frowned upon.  Extra mileage to prepare for the May 10K can be a good idea but that would be a systematic increase for several weeks to build a bigger base.  To race a decent 10k, you only need a long run of 12 to 13 miles  (20K) with the rest of the week's mileage.

       

      Now, as far as motivation, all kinds of new challenges can be good.  If the 10K is not an important race but just preparing you for a summer or fall marathon, then a "different" week could be in order.  In my running group, we have what is called the 100/300 club.  This is run 100 miles (150K+) in one week (Must be either Monday through Sunday or Sunday through Saturday) and additionally, run 300 miles in the same calendar month.  A few of us are going at it this week but the major snowstorm on the east coast of US is becoming a problem.  We are still running a marathon at the end of March but results aren't important so doing this "crazy" challenge works okay.

       

      Summary-  regular training, wouldn't do the Super Week.  Fun things - would create a Super Week but need to build up a little more.

       






      Feeling the growl again

        I you want to do a stunt, go ahead and do a stunt.  But a stunt is not to be confused with training.

         

        If by "good idea" you mean something that will help you in the long run, no it's not a good idea.  But if a stunt motivates you it might serve some purpose.  Drastic increases in mileage are a common way to get injured, so be careful.  And since you will be putting your body through stresses it is not used to, it won't recover like usual, and you will probably need to drop the workouts and keep it easy.  I nearly doubled my mileage in a stunt a couple years back (70-80 miles a week up to 147), there was no energy for workouts.

        "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

         

          It would be a stunt for me, that’s for sure, but I was thinking maybe it would also be somewhat beneficial in my overall training.

           

          The importance of the May 10k is relative. The important goal I have is to race a “good” first marathon. But that will be in fall 2015. No typo here: in a year and a half. The whole idea of my training is to have about three years of regular running before I start a marathon training program so my body is good and ready for the pounding. I’ve been running for around 20 months now. So the 10k is a fun way to measure my improvement. I will go all out and won’t be holding back at all, but the fall 2015 marathon is my real goal.

           

          The 100-300 challenge is very cool. I was viewing my “super week” as a similar (for my relative abilities) “crazy” challenge.

           

          I thought it would give my body a somewhat calculated pounding, and that the adaptation would be beneficial in the long term.

            I did a 70 mile week once off a base of 45-50 mile weeks.  It was a great confidence builder knowing that I could actually run that many miles in one week.  The only problem was that I did it three weeks before a marathon, so was not properly tapered for that marathon.  No injuries, just general fatigue.  I'm thinking of running a high mileage week again, but this time it will not be close to a goal race.

             

            Go for it.  Just don't do any speed work that week.  Or maybe the week after.

            jimmyb


              Sounds like fun. I'm all for experimentation.

              Trial and error, trial and perfection.

              Have fun.

              Log    PRs


              MoBramExam

                With a week off work, instead of just running mega-miles, ever consider living a week as an elite runner/athlete; i.e. make training your job?

                 

                In other words, live a week like the Lagats, Rupps, and Cains live.  Get in good solid workouts, pre-fuel right, re-fuel right, eat right, get sufficient sleep, and do all that ancillary stuff (like stretching, rolling, strength work, etc.).  All without the pressures and stress of working for a living.

                 

                Would still be a "super week" training and much more productive in the overall picture.

                 



                  From a training standpoint you won't gain much but it might be a good learning experience. A bunch of years ago my wife and kids went to away for February vacation but I had just started a new job and could take the time, so I was a bachelor for a week and I decided to run 100 miles that week, where my normal training volume was around 70. I still had to go to work but I didn't have to do much else beside run, feed myself, clean up after myself and do my own laundry. The first thing I learned is how blindingly easy life is without kids. But also it recalibrated what I thought of as a heavy training week. Mentally I found it really helpful.

                  Runners run.

                    MoBramExam, although I'm off work, I still have a wife and kids and what you are suggesting, although a very good idea, would mean that the whole family evolve around my little person to some extent. We eat meals as a family, need to cook for the family, and we all have activities we need to synchronize. Thanks for the suggestion, but I'm not going to do that. Although I might be able to fit in a 30 minute afternoon nap once or twice during the week.


                    Closed for repairs

                      From a training standpoint you won't gain much but it might be a good learning experience. A bunch of years ago my wife and kids went to away for February vacation but I had just started a new job and could take the time, so I was a bachelor for a week and I decided to run 100 miles that week, where my normal training volume was around 70. I still had to go to work but I didn't have to do much else beside run, feed myself, clean up after myself and do my own laundry. The first thing I learned is how blindingly easy life is without kids. But also it recalibrated what I thought of as a heavy training week. Mentally I found it really helpful.

                       

                      What about the 100 beers?

                       

                        This thread reminded me of something I just recently read. Not saying it's good or bad, just related...

                         

                        http://www.runnersworld.com/race-training/super-training-blocks

                        I literally don't care that I use the word literally incorrectly.

                          Maybe 70-80 km would be a smarter move knowing that I won't really get benefits from the stunt anyways. I definitely don't want to get hurt. I think I'll just ask myself everyday if I feel strong enough for a 13-15k and take it from there.

                           

                          Thanks everyone for your thoughts and advice.

                            Well today was my 7th consecutive day of running. Went for the stunt but did not cut back on my planned speed work. Felt tired on wednesday so I went for an easy recovery 8k, which was smart. This morning, before my run, I was at 81k. 90 was in the pocket as I felt good enough for 10, but wasn't sure about hitting 100. Finally came back home with tired legs before I hit 100. I made it over 99 km, and could have run the rest, but 100 is just a number. Tomorrow, full rest day.

                             

                            I spent a whole lot of time standing this week. To loosen up the legs. I can't really do that when I'm working at the office.