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Fuel Belt, Camel Back or Other? (Read 1621 times)

     I don't worry about water until about 15+ miles.  Almost all of my long routes are out and back so I'll carry a handheld and take a few long draws off of it before stashing it at, say, the 5mile mark on the way out.  Pick it up on the way back.  That way I'm only carrying the thing when it's full for ~5 miles. 


    Runs With Kid

      Thanks everyone.  For those of you who can run long distances without water...I'm jealous...I take sips every 1/2 mile or so.  I'll probably try a vest for my longer runs and maybe a hand-held for the shorter runs.  Thanks again.


      HobbyJogger & HobbyRacer

        I've been recently experimenting with running without water in 90-100F humid weather, and I don't necessarily recommend it -- at least not for myself.

         

        Why have I been doing these experiments, one might ask. The reasons are the fundamental driving scientific forces of laziness, lack of planning, and sheer stupidity.

        It's a 5k. It hurt like hell...then I tried to pick it up. The end.


        Runs With Kid

          I got my Nathan Vest and absolutely love it, thank you to all who recommended it.  I'm petite (5'0") so I wasn't sure that it would work for me but it's quite confortable. 

          jeevmon


            I used to use an Amphipod belt, but found it didn't hold enough. I've started running with a handheld 24 oz. Camelbak Podium bottle with a second bottle in a belt for longer (10-20) mile runs. Drop a Nuun tablet in each one and I'm good to go.

             

            I tried a Camelbak backpack, but I found that I got overheated - I think maybe it kept me from sweating out my back? I am a big sweater and I find I really need the fluid, especially in the Central Texas summer heat.

            MrH


              The process is the goal.

              Men heap together the mistakes of their lives, and create a monster they call Destiny.

                I'm about to pull the trigger on a backpack style, either the Camelbak Marathoner or one of the Nathan models (HPL 020 or 008, I guess).  [Hate carrying anything in my hands, and my routes are usually unplanned, not near any water sources or convenience stores, or both.]

                 

                Any last words?

                “Everything you need is already inside.” -- Bill Bowerman


                CT JEFF

                  Hi Clive,

                   

                  I have done a fair amount of reseach, I went into REI and their selection was mainly Camelbak and Osprey. I also was recommended the Ultrimate Direction vests. I agree with your choice for the Camelbak Marathoner and am about to pull the trigger myself. Here is what I came up with. (1) Recommendations for Nathan were nixed by the fold-a-flap top for me.  (2) I wanted a vest that had a bladder already in it - Ultimate Direction appears to come with bottles. (3) I liked the Marathoner overall - My needs on a 16 mile (cold-weather run) were less than 40 oz. I think I can do fine with 70oz on a hot day - marathon. And, if not, I should be able to supplement if needed. (4) I can go without water at times - esp. in the winter, shorter runs, whatnot - Last fall, I did a 5k, didnt bring a thing - no big deal. But then at mile 2, a family had water available. I took a cup and it turned my stomach. it smelled like bleach. others were complaining too. I like the idea of controlling my hydration - whether needed or not, I'll have it. (5) Food. I like this pack because the pockets seem accessible while running. several packs have all the zippers and straps and pockets in the back. Fine for hiking, not for running. there are several reviews that state these pockets are big enough for most mobile phones. (6) safety. This pack has some reflective tape on it, and has an emergency whistle. More races are requiring (esp. trail races) participants to have an emergency whistle on them.

                   

                  Id like to give a virtual "pat on the back" for all those who responded that they dont need hydration. When asked if you prefer A or B,  you chose C.

                   

                  Marathoner

                  RUN SAFE.     Barefoot 1st: 6/9/13. PR: 5k=22:50 10k=47:46 HM 1:51. FM 4:28

                  Sept /27 Sat. 9am (scheduling conflict) Hogsback HM -

                  October 11 Sat 8am Hartford Marathon.

                  November 15 Sat 12:30pm- Spartan Race with DW in Fenway

                  Jan 1 Gordys First Race. 10k. Jan 18 Disneyland Star Wars HM 5:30am


                  Queen of 3rd Place

                    Love my Nathan vest myself. There are lots of pros/cons about bladders etc. and I feel like I've tried them all, but the Nathan has been the only vest/backpack/hippack/handheld that just disappears. I simply almost don't feel like I'm carrying a thing, even though I might have a couple liters of water, a sandwich or two, cookies, and miscellany like lip balm and car keys. That's why I used the word "love".

                     

                    Jeff, thanks for the pics and that looks like a worthy contender for the Nathan. I prefer the folding flap myself as it's easier to fill and you can turn the whole bladder inside out so that it dries better and doesn't get moldy. Also the way the Nathan bladder tubes and bits come apart is much nicer than the Camelback, and I've had a Camelback bladder fail more quickly (at the tube junctions) than the Nathan (although others have reported the opposite).

                     

                    However, for unsupported long trail runs into nowhere, I use an REI Flash 18. I can carry running + emergency stuff (ultralight backpacking-type things like ropes, water filters, shelter, first aid, extra food and water shoes etc - seems I do a lot of river crossings around here hence the ropes and water shoes). It nicely accommodates a water bladder, and is very adjustable. With even a light load vs backpacking, when you're running it's good to be able to shift how things sit on you. That little pack has been on 20+ mile runs ranging from Death Valley (not in summer!), the Big Sur area coastal ranges (hilly and slippery!), and the Sierra Nevada (high elevation and rocky!) PLUS it's also good for running to work and carrying your work clothes, although you have to put your work clothes in a separate plastic bag so they don't get wet from your sweat. Oh and I used it for a one week vacation last year where I knew I was going to be hopping around a lot on planes and trains. Talk about money well-spent!

                     

                    I wonder if AKTrail can pipe in here, there could be some trail running stories that make my little excursions look like a slow jog around the block.

                    Ex runner

                      A lot depends on how much stuff you need to carry with you and how accessible. I prefer built-in pouches on the front, esp. for heavier items like camera or clif bars. Light stuff (wheat thins, pretzels) are ok in slide on pouches since they don't bounce that much. I drink better from bladders and usually prefer them in winter. If there's an opportunity to refill at an aid station, then I consider bottles with wide tops since they're easier to refill than a bladder if I need to. Bladders may not need refilling.

                       

                      For most things in the 1-2 hr range, I'll use a UD Strider with a 20-24oz bottle. The front pouch carries snacks or camera or gps or light jacket or head lamp maybe a combination of 2 (usually headlamp and food in winter).

                       

                      In the 3-6hr range these days, I'd probably use my Salomon XT 5 wings, which can handle either hydration bladder or 2 bottles or all the above. Strap-on pouches don't ride that well on the narrow straps and belt, but if I don't need both bottle holsters, I can put food in the empty one. The bladder is really hard to put in its pouch and thread through the shoulder strap.

                       

                      For longer races these days, I've been using Golite Rush. It's got nice belt pockets up front, and the shoulder straps are substantial enough that they hold some pouches ok. You can use the water bottle pouches, but they're not as easily accessible as on the Salomon. I do carry a water bottle with this to get water from stream and treat that, then add it to my bladder when I stop. It's cumbersome, but for long races, I really like to drink from a bladder.

                       

                      What I would really like to get for races with aid stations is an Ultraspire Kinetic (or at least I think I do) - 2 bottles plus upfront storage on the belt and some space in back for a jacket. They're coming out with some newer designs also.

                       

                      At one time I considered one of the vests, like from Nathan, but the upfront storage didn't seem like it would work for me. I like the bulk of the stuff on my waist, but supported from shoulders. (backpacker in me)

                       

                      In the past, I've used various models of Gregory (Reactor, Iso) which aren't made anymore. I think I prefer a longer, thinner pack than these most of the time, so the waist strap is down near my waist and not up too high.

                       

                      Most of my races initially had no aid - including 38mi between trailheads. Races I've done more recently have some aid or aren't quite as long.

                       

                      Still looking for the perfect mousetrap.

                       

                      PS: The only time I'd use bottles with small tops (like the 10oz amphipods or whatever) is to carry something (like my chocolate slimfast)  and not refill it. Those small tops are too hard for people to deal with at aid stations.

                      "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog


                      Bacon Party!

                        I've had good success with the GoLite waist packs - cinched tight around my hip bones (iliac crest) - both two-bottle and single-bottle.

                        My current favorite is a Nathan single-bottle waist pack with a couple of pockets. The wide elastic band is very comfortable.

                         

                        All of the above have worked well for me at distances / durations up to 100 miles / 24 hours - no chafing, no bruising.

                        Liz

                        pace sera, sera

                          Resurrected thread!

                           

                          FWIW, I went with the Nathan HPL-020, because I caught a deal on one.  It works very well -- no complaints at all.

                           

                          My own problem, though: I inadvertently tighten my neck/shoulder muscles as I run with it, eventually getting muscle cramps across my upper back on long runs.  When I used a Fuel Belt, I discovered I was unintentionally holding my arms slightly farther away from my torso than usual, which also would cause some cramping/soreness.

                           

                          But the Nathan works great. Cool

                          “Everything you need is already inside.” -- Bill Bowerman


                          CT JEFF

                            Hey - Got my Camelbak Marathoner today. Gave it a test run on the TM. Goal was 8 miles, but only made it 4.8 between new gear and the kids bugging me. Smile  - So, here is my very very limited, first hand report:

                             

                            PROS:

                            • tons of storage for fluids. I filled all 70 oz, but only used 10. Next run, Im filling it 20 oz, and getting used to the feeling and adding fluid as I need it
                            • decent storage in the front. I have a Samsung Note 2. Its a big phone. Fit in the front pocket without too much bouncing or adjusting.
                            • heard some complaints of a plastic taste first use, so I filled - let it sit, then dumped and refilled, but forgot about the straw. Didnt affect my run.
                            • the straps all tighten up easily during the run.

                            CONS

                            • straps bounced around a little.
                            • 70 oz still takes some getting used to

                            Gotta run. I'll report how its going in a month or so.

                            RUN SAFE.     Barefoot 1st: 6/9/13. PR: 5k=22:50 10k=47:46 HM 1:51. FM 4:28

                            Sept /27 Sat. 9am (scheduling conflict) Hogsback HM -

                            October 11 Sat 8am Hartford Marathon.

                            November 15 Sat 12:30pm- Spartan Race with DW in Fenway

                            Jan 1 Gordys First Race. 10k. Jan 18 Disneyland Star Wars HM 5:30am

                              For my warm weather running I buy a flat of 16oz waters from Costco. I use it as a hand held and choose my routes according to where I'll be able to refill it. As I drink from it I'll crush it to minimize the sloshing. When I know I can make it home w/o water I throw it away.

                               

                              Yes, I know I'm killing the earth doing this and I also know I need to avoid towns such as Concord where such activity is illegal...

                               

                              MTA: Just to be clear, I only run with one bottle at a time, not the entire flat!


                              Hoodoo Guru

                                For my warm weather running I buy a flat of 16oz waters from Costco. I use it as a hand held and choose my routes according to where I'll be able to refill it. As I drink from it I'll crush it to minimize the sloshing. When I know I can make it home w/o water I throw it away.

                                 

                                Yes, I know I'm killing the earth doing this and I also know I need to avoid towns such as Concord where such activity is illegal...

                                 

                                MTA: Just to be clear, I only run with one bottle at a time, not the entire flat!

                                 

                                This is me also.  I will use a big rubber band or one of my daughter's hair bands around my hand and the bottle to make it easier to carry.  I used to think that I couldn't carry anything while running. Then I tried it and found out I was wrong.  I refill my disposable bottles with tap water, so not as much waste.

                                The tangents are moot.

                                 

                                iLoveAdvo.com

                                 

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