Resting Heart Rate (Read 1604 times)

R2E


"run" "to" "eat"

    it's a very long thread. a small clue as to where the information can be located wouldn't completely undermine your snark, and might actually strengthen it... unless... you can't find the info in the thread, either.

    i find the sunshine beckons me to open up the gate and dream and dream ~~robbie williams


    HobbyJogger & HobbyRacer

      7 pages is a long thread?

      It's a 5k. It hurt like hell...then I tried to pick it up. The end.


      A Dance with Monkeys

        7 pages is a long thread?

         

        If HR were the only indicator of heart strength, then we'd have no need for all those fancy, shmancy heart tests.  Just measure heart rate.

         

        Heart rate is partially influenced by heart stroke volume (how much blood each heart beat squeezes), but is also influenced by ejection fraction, blood hemoglobin concentration, blood hemoglobin saturation, volume of oxygen delivered to the working muscles, peripheral vascular resistance, sympathetic neural tone, intrinsic/congenital factors and current level of work. In some cases, aberrant electrical conduction around or through the heart muscle may also influence heart rate.  Many of these factors change second to second, some don't.  ALl that to say, heart rate has numerous factors influencing it...

         

        Smile


        Dedicated and Determined

          Low heart rate can be pathological. If the SA node and AV node go out and it fires on the ventricle alone it will be very low. The SA node has its own natural rhythm and the AV node does as well. Look up the electrical conduction of the heart. If both fail the heart rate will be very low (bradycardic) and only fire from the ventricle. If in ER or hospital definitely let them know you run alot and have a low HR. They will flip out if it is low and they dont know you are in great shape.

           

          Low HR is an effect of cardio exercise. The heart becomes stronger and doesnt have to beat as much to move the same amount of blood. The ejection fraction is much greater in a strong heart. It will not need to beat so much in order to do the same job. And when resting, there is not much blood to move and if very fit it wont take very many beats to do it.

           

          It would probably help to not have it beat as often in the long run but I cannot be sure. And if the muscle becomes to enlarged around the left ventricle, it will hinder the ejection fraction and the amount of blood that can flow. I doubt running will cause such an enlarged heart tissue but it happens for other reasons to people and it is bad.

           

          Either way I feel cardio and running is great for your health and I just see a low hr as showing you are trained well and that your heart is strong enough to pump out alot more blood with each pump resulting in a lower heart rate.

           

          I was going to be a doctor but became a Masters prepared nurse and am now not working and am focusing on running.

          PRs // 5k : 17:44 // 7k: 27:21 // 8k: 31:33 //10k: 41:25 // 1/2 Marathon: 1:28:12 // Marathon: 3:08:49 

          http://athlinks.com/myresults/51363208/Larry-Koren.aspx

          April 2009 = started running for first time in life, Oct 2009 = 3:08 marathon

          2012 Goals:

          0. Lose weight, 2009 I was 152, Now 169...Goal is 14Xlbs

          1. Finish Pfitzinger 18 70 plan

          2. Toledo Marathon: Sub 3 hour

          3. Finish Pfitzinger 18 85 plan

          4. Columbus Marathon: sub 2:55 or better...


          just a simple cat

            I was all smug that my  slow pulse rate at each checkup was because I am such a fit runner athlete, .......now it turns out my thyroid was way low instead.....d'oh!

             

            Running is stupid

              I was going to post an "Okay everybody, brag here on your resting HR."  Then I saw Clive's barely-above-zero rate.

              Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.


              Dedicated and Determined

                Mine is 38-42bpm. I told the doctor this and he didnt believe me. Then he gave me an ekg and verified sinus bradycardia with no other problems. It is not crazy low but I have alot more training to do. And like I said if very low in the hospital make sure it is known or they are going to be doing things to you that you do not want or need.

                PRs // 5k : 17:44 // 7k: 27:21 // 8k: 31:33 //10k: 41:25 // 1/2 Marathon: 1:28:12 // Marathon: 3:08:49 

                http://athlinks.com/myresults/51363208/Larry-Koren.aspx

                April 2009 = started running for first time in life, Oct 2009 = 3:08 marathon

                2012 Goals:

                0. Lose weight, 2009 I was 152, Now 169...Goal is 14Xlbs

                1. Finish Pfitzinger 18 70 plan

                2. Toledo Marathon: Sub 3 hour

                3. Finish Pfitzinger 18 85 plan

                4. Columbus Marathon: sub 2:55 or better...

                  When I began running and checking my resting HR in May 2009, I had a RHR of about 63. Today my RHR is about 47 bpm.

                   

                  Back in August I crashed my bike during my warmup for a triathlon I was planning on that day and took a trip to the ER for evaluations after I was unconcious for nearly 5 minutes. The emergency room doctor told me my HR was low and asked if I was a runner. I told him I swim, run or bike every day totalling about 10 hours a week. I also added that my RHR was 46-48 regularly. The doctor then told me that the low HR was nothing he was concerned with.

                   

                  The pain that hurts the worse is the imagined pain. One of the most difficult arts of racing is learning to ignore the imagined pain and just live with the present pain (which is always bearable.) - Jeff

                   

                  2014 Goals:

                   

                  Stay healthy

                  Enjoy life

                   

                  henryc


                    When I began running and checking my resting HR in May 2009, I had a RHR of about 63. Today my RHR is about 147 bpm.

                     

                     

                    You may want to lay off the coffee.

                      Back in August I crashed my bike during my warmup for a triathlon I was planning on that day and took a trip to the ER for evaluations after I was unconcious for nearly 5 minutes. The emergency room doctor told me my HR was low and asked if I was a runner. I told him I swim, run or bike every day totalling about 10 hours a week. I also added that my RHR was 46-48 regularly. The doctor then told me that the low HR was nothing he was concerned with.

                      A couple physician friends saw my kid's RoadID band (the mini-Livestrong silicone type), asked about it, and I showed them my grown-up sized RoadID.  They noticed the "Low Resting HR" line and asked how low.  Upon hearing "30", they both made a face and said it should say that.  I'm like, "Yeah, it says 'Low Resting HR' right there."  They said ER docs will take that to mean 50-ish and, upon seeing a really low HR (to their minds, that means anything under ~50), will start treating for (and searching for the cause of) the bradycardia.  Their advice: if your HR is <50, you should be explicit about it.

                      “Everything you need is already inside.” -- Bill Bowerman

                        You may want to lay off the coffee.

                         

                        Haha, and I should read what I type (or try to type) before I post.

                         

                        The pain that hurts the worse is the imagined pain. One of the most difficult arts of racing is learning to ignore the imagined pain and just live with the present pain (which is always bearable.) - Jeff

                         

                        2014 Goals:

                         

                        Stay healthy

                        Enjoy life

                         

                          A couple physician friends saw my kid's RoadID band (the mini-Livestrong silicone type), asked about it, and I showed them my grown-up sized RoadID.  They noticed the "Low Resting HR" line and asked how low.  Upon hearing "30", they both made a face and said it should say that.  I'm like, "Yeah, it says 'Low Resting HR' right there."  They said ER docs will take that to mean 50-ish and, upon seeing a really low HR (to their minds, that means anything under ~50), will start treating for (and searching for the cause of) the bradycardia.  Their advice: if your HR is <50, you should be explicit about it.

                           

                          Damn, I just ordered my Road ID a few weeks ago. I would have included that if I had known that then.

                           

                          The pain that hurts the worse is the imagined pain. One of the most difficult arts of racing is learning to ignore the imagined pain and just live with the present pain (which is always bearable.) - Jeff

                           

                          2014 Goals:

                           

                          Stay healthy

                          Enjoy life

                           

                            Is it really that odd to have a RHR in the 30s?

                              That's what I said! Cool

                               

                              I never even thought about noting the HR on the thing; RoadID suggested it when I was ordering, so I went with it.

                              “Everything you need is already inside.” -- Bill Bowerman

                                Is it really that odd to have a RHR in the 30s?

                                I'd answer you, but Trent will just supersede me.

                                 

                                (But I think the answer is yes, as far as EMTs and trauma physicians are concerned.)

                                “Everything you need is already inside.” -- Bill Bowerman