123

Trail Running - who does it? (Read 948 times)

    Suddenly I'm curious about trail running. Who here has done it? Would you recommend trying it or not? Is there a certain level of running someone needs or SHOULD be at before trying it? What are the increased risks of injuries?

    Michelle



    Scout7


    CPT Curmudgeon

      I've done a few. It's fun! There are people who don't run on roads at all, so it can't be all bad. Injuries....if you're not careful, you can roll your ankles, or worst case fall and bang your head. I've rolled ankles, generally nothing major, though. Ya just gotta be aware of what you're doing. But it's definitely worth doing.
        I've done it... Lots of fun. Very different vibe. If you're a math/pace geek like a lot of runners, it's a bit of an adjustment... at the last trail race I did, I had a 10min/mile pace, and still finished in the top third... those hills/stumps/rocks, etc...do a number on your pace. But it's a lot of fun and I've actually decided to probably drop a few tri's from my summer schedule and replace them with trail races.

        Go to http://certainintelligence.blogspot.com for my blog.


        My dogs are fast, not me

          I've done it. The runners' club here in Memphis had a winter race series that was trails. It was FUN. Muddy, wet, slippery, etc. It was a tough adjustment in regards to pacing and I did roll an ankle on a tree root, sprained it and derailed my training for a half marathon. But, I do want to do more trail running and hope to learn from my mistakes. I felt like a little kid out in the puddles after a rain storm. Robin
          Robin
            I like it. I did my first trail race last year & it was a lot of fun. I haven't run a trail since our mild January but, am looking forward to resuming hitting the woods a couple of times a week shortly. I'm still working on my Spring racing schedule but, am definitely looking at some more trail races.

            The secret of life is honesty and fair dealing. If you can fake that, you've got it made.


            I've got a fever...

              I've done it... Lots of fun. Very different vibe.
              Good point. One of the funnest races I've ever done was a trail 25k (which included having to climb a ladder!). Very laid back. Different atmosphere entirely from a typical road race. Yes As far as trail running itself, ankles are the biggest worry. But because of the uneven terrain, if you don't hurt yourself, trail running will really strengthen your leg muscles because of a) the hills and b) your're using your legs differently than just simple running on flat ground. You should go to your local running store and check out some trail running shoes. Better grip, and added ankle support. I don't have any experience with them, but Vasque is supposed to make real good trail footwear if you get serious about it. Cheers, Jeff

              On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.


              You'll ruin your knees!

                Well, I do a little... The first rule about trail running is that we don't talk about trail running! Just kidding! Most of my races are on trails...as much of my training as possible is done on trails. The appeal for me comes on many different fronts. 1) trail running puts me closer to nature, something that is quite appealing to me 2) trail running is easier on the joints...yes, ankles and feet take more abuse, but I have as many issues with knees and hips as I do when I run on harder surfaces...and ankles get stronger 3) races on trails are much more fun, more community, kindof like getting together with some of your very best friends for a great time (even the best friends you have never met!) 4) the aid stations are waaaaaaay better at trail races 5) there tends to be as many people hanging around cheering for the last person to finish as there are for the first person to finish (often, the crowd includes the first person cheering for the last person...just don't see that in road races) 6) not uncommon in trail races to have the fast frontrunners shouting encouragement to those further back in the pack on an out-and-back section of the course...that's way cool! 7) how many times have you ever been out running roads and come around a corner and be stopped dead in your tracks because the amazing view has just sucked your breath away! 8) in trail races, I tend to look more at where I finish in the field rather than what my pace was! 9) I have YET to find a trail runner that wants to argue the merit of 400 meter repeats versus 800 meter repeats for speed work... I started out on the roads, stumbled into a trail race and have never seriously considered going back...IF I run a road race, it is mainly just an excuse to see how much I have slowed down (slown down?)...I tend to think that trail running makes me slower, but I don't think my marathon time has suffered all that much in the last 6 years! Don't worry too much about shoes/gear (oh, yeah, we got gear!) yet...just keep in mind you socks will never be the same! Lynn B

                ""...the truth that someday, you will go for your last run. But not today—today you got to run." - Matt Crownover (after Western States)


                A Dance with Monkeys

                  Lynn likely has the most experience, although I know Jeff has done quite a bit as well. In my experience, just go out and run trails. Walk the steep hills, focus on fun and the roots, rocks and ruts, and enjoy yourself. Your pace will be substantially slower than on road, but the impact will be far less. Good stuff! I have done quite a bit of trail running, and typically just use my regular footwear without problem. Ran a trail marathon last Summer in a pair of my road shoes and socks, without gators or any special gear, and finished uninjured and happy. Of course that event only had one hill, and that climb only in the first half (but it was a heck of a climb).


                  I've got a fever...

                    Walk the steep hills, focus on fun and the roots, rocks and ruts, and enjoy yourself.
                    Yeah, trail running is really about fun (and often scenery). It's like being a kid again playing in the woods. And much more so than road running or racing, it's about the journey itself as opposed to how fast you get from A to B.

                    On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.

                    Scout7


                    CPT Curmudgeon

                      And beer. Trail running is alot about beer.


                      I've got a fever...

                        Of course that event only had one hill, and that climb only in the first half (but it was a heck of a climb).
                        Damn Trent, did you just tuck-and-roll for the second half of that one? Tongue

                        On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.


                        A Dance with Monkeys

                          Jeffgoblue sums it up perfectly. Remember when you were a kid? You never ran. By that I mean, you never put on special shoes, technical pants and shirt, charged up your garmin, waited for the perfect running conditions and then went out and collected a prescribed number of miles and a particular pace or effort. No. You never did that. When you were a kid, you chased your friends around the yard. You played stormtrooper and Luke Skywalker or Princess Lea. You tried to capture bank robbers. You played hide and seek. You got sweaty and stinky and dirty and kept your exertion up for hours, but had no idea you were doing so. You did not Run, but you ran. And climbed. And rolled. And spun around. And had a blast. Trailrunning is like that. Don't worry about all the stuff and the mathmatical exigesis of the particulars of your pace. No, just go out and have a blast. Like a kid. Chase Darth Vader through the woods. And get dirty. And yeah, tuck and roll them downhills Wink
                            I'd rather run a trail than a road anyday. Roads get kinda boring after a while where a trail is much more varied terrrrain in a given distance. This also gives you a better workout. I'll have muscle soreness in places I've never had it after running some of the harder trails. The fact you aren't breathing in exhaust fumes is another big plus. Just get you a good pair of trail shoes and go.
                              you guys make me wanna run more trails! Smile I've run several around here but for most part, it's rare because I'm on such a tight schedule around dh's work schedule. I will run my normal runs in the dark because there are lighted pathways but I'm a little sketchy about running trails alone. in the dark.
                              Jennifer mm#1231
                                Suddenly I'm curious about trail running. Who here has done it? Would you recommend trying it or not? Is there a certain level of running someone needs or SHOULD be at before trying it? What are the increased risks of injuries?
                                I'm in love with trail running. Of course, my trails aren't rugged like I think a lot of these guys run on. You still have to be aware of where you're stepping, but not any boulders or super steep inclines here. I have only begun getting back into running and I believe the trails made it really easy for me in the beginning. Every step you take is pure comfort - our trails are mostly sand! Trail running is all I started with, then continued to do a handful of runs on the roads when it was snowy. Even when I was on the road, I was still running on the snow which provided some cushioning. Then after the thaw we got not long ago and it had warmed up, I thought I'd go do a nice run or two on the paved trail since it was clear and the dirt trails around here still had quite a bit of snow on them. I could definately tell a difference on that pavement vs. the soft sand. I'm thinking that, along with probably just doing too much too soon, is a factor in why I'm now "benched". Depending on the type of trails of course (like I said, mine aren't too technical), I would think that trail running would be a better beginning point than something you'd have to train up to. So, yes!!! I would definately recommend it!! As far as shoes, I personally like and need a lot of cushioning, so the trail shoes that I've tried on (not run in however) just never seemed cushy enough. I just use my regular shoes for the trails around here and haven't had a problem- grip on the bottom is fine and I don't seem to get too many things in my shoes!! I haven't rolled my ankles....yet. (I know I just jinxed myself.) It would be nice to have the tongue connected to the shoe to ward off debris and possibly a waterproof layer, but eh. Not necessary for me anyway. As mentioned, just the solitude alone is worth trail running. It "cleanses the spirit" and is just a totally different experience. I don't take my Ipod when I'm on the trails. How cool is it to be running along and then stop for the deer in the middle of the trail, or the owl that just took off above your head!?
                                123