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Train slow or fast to race fast? (Read 1918 times)


Siobhan876

    I've been searching online for a simple answer to that question, but apparently there isn't one! I've found people who swear by both options. I'm happy to cut my training paces, but also to train harder if it benefits my half-marathon time; which to choose?!

     

    So which theory do you train by? Do you train slow or fast to improve?

    "Eventually you learn that the competition is against the little voice inside you that wants you to quit." - George Sheehan.

      It's not a choice... do both! 

       

      It's also a false dichotomy... do it all! 

       

      Slow down your easy runs to be able to handle higher mileage and to recover between harder/faster efforts.

      "Because in the end, you won't remember the time you spent working in the office or mowing your lawn.  Climb that goddamn mountain."

      Jack Kerouac

      empty1971


        The answer is.....train appropriately.

         

        That means that you will run long runs slowly--1-2 minutes/mile slower than race pace.  These runs aer designed to give you endurance.

         

        Tempo runs are usually just under race pace.  These build stamina.

         

        Intervals are where you get your speed!

         

        You need all three to be well-trained.

         

        Check out the MacMillan Race Calculator--you plug in a recent race time and it gives you a pretty detailed chart of estimated race goals and more importantly, training paces for various kinds of training runs.

        http://worththehurt.blogspot.com/


        Right on Hereford...

          What is "race pace"?

            What is "race pace"?

             

            and "which" race pace are we talking about.

             

            oh bother... this is the thread where the OP's initial post got posted twice.

              What is "race pace"?

               

              18:28 min/mi at my last big race...   my tempo runs probably wouldn't be terribly useful at that pace. Big grin

              empty1971


                What is "race pace"?

                 

                That's the trick.  My race pace for a half marathon for example is 9:09.  If that is what I am training for, I will adjust my training paces to match. 

                 

                Your race pace needs to be based on your current level of fitness and the distance you are training for.

                 

                It is important to start with a race to properly guage your current level of fitness.  (in other words, don't train for some ideal pace, but a reality-based pace that is tied to your current fitness).  Now during a training cycle, you can run other races to see if your fitness level is improving and makes adjustments based on that.

                http://worththehurt.blogspot.com/

                  That's the trick.  My race pace for a half marathon for example is 9:09.  If that is what I am training for, I will adjust my training paces to match. 

                   

                  Your race pace needs to be based on your current level of fitness and the distance you are training for.

                   

                  It is important to start with a race to properly guage your current level of fitness.  (in other words, don't train for some ideal pace, but a reality-based pace that is tied to your current fitness).  Now during a training cycle, you can run other races to see if your fitness level is improving and makes adjustments based on that.

                   

                  He was being sarcastic. DRR is a sub 3 hour marathoner with over 8000 miles on his log.

                   

                  The pain that hurts the worse is the imagined pain. One of the most difficult arts of racing is learning to ignore the imagined pain and just live with the present pain (which is always bearable.) - Jeff

                   

                  2014 Goals:

                   

                  Stay healthy

                  Enjoy life

                   

                    That's the trick.  My race pace for a half marathon for example is 9:09.  If that is what I am training for, I will adjust my training paces to match. 

                     

                    Your race pace needs to be based on your current level of fitness and the distance you are training for.

                     

                    It is important to start with a race to properly guage your current level of fitness.  (in other words, don't train for some ideal pace, but a reality-based pace that is tied to your current fitness).  Now during a training cycle, you can run other races to see if your fitness level is improving and makes adjustments based on that.

                    How can a person - forgive me - who hasn't been running too long guage such a thing?  Just run.  

                     

                    Granted, I am a bit cranky, but this thread is bugging me a bit.  Just run. Just run.  Just run.  

                    "If you have the fire, run..." -John Climacus

                      Siobhan   ---  don't let the cranky guys get to ypu --- you have a legitimate question..... 

                       

                      To my knowledge good runners (of which I am not) are good runners because they have developed a good solid aerobics capacity from running LOTS of miles.....and normaly 90 to 95% of those mile are run at a comfortable easy pace (or in other words, they can run and carry on a conversation at the same time)...with about 5 to 10% of the miles being run at some type of an UP TEMPO pace  -- Intervals, or hills or something that causes you to run hard....     Many people will tell you that running fast is not about being fast, its about having a solid aerobic capicity and the endurance to keep on running at a good pace......what pace....who knows....different for us all.

                       

                      In reviewing your log, you dont have much of a base, so you need to focus on building your mileage at a comfortable easy pace (again, you can carry on a conversation while you are running).....the more miles you run the stronger you get and the stronger you get the faster you will eventually become.

                       

                      After you have your mileage base up to a good solid level, then you should start thinking about some type of "faster running" like on the track, or strides or hills or any of the other speed techniques....

                       

                      But running 101 says ===get your base mileage up first.       You would probably realized  a pretty solid improvement if all you did was slowly increase your mileage to 30 or 40 miles per week over the next 4 or 5 or 6 months........You'd see a better improvement if you could run 50 or 60 MPW........If you look at the running logs of the better runners in Running Ahead (or other sites) the one constant that makes them better is they are logging a lot of miles and almost all of those miles are at an easy pace...

                       

                      As Nader said ----- Just run, Just run, Just run.......and I'll throw in - run easy....

                      Champions are made when no one is watching

                        Siobhan   ---  don't let the cranky guys get to ypu --- you have a legitimate question..... 

                         

                        To my knowledge good runners (of which I am not) are good runners because they have developed a good solid aerobics capacity from running LOTS of miles.....and normaly 90 to 95% of those mile are run at a comfortable easy pace (or in other words, they can run and carry on a conversation at the same time)...with about 5 to 10% of the miles being run at some type of an UP TEMPO pace  -- Intervals, or hills or something that causes you to run hard....     Many people will tell you that running fast is not about being fast, its about having a solid aerobic capicity and the endurance to keep on running at a good pace......what pace....who knows....different for us all.

                         

                        In reviewing your log, you dont have much of a base, so you need to focus on building your mileage at a comfortable easy pace (again, you can carry on a conversation while you are running).....the more miles you run the stronger you get and the stronger you get the faster you will eventually become.

                         

                        After you have your mileage base up to a good solid level, then you should start thinking about some type of "faster running" like on the track, or strides or hills or any of the other speed techniques....

                         

                        But running 101 says ===get your base mileage up first.       You would probably realized  a pretty solid improvement if all you did was slowly increase your mileage to 30 or 40 miles per week over the next 4 or 5 or 6 months........You'd see a better improvement if you could run 50 or 60 MPW........If you look at the running logs of the better runners in Running Ahead (or other sites) the one constant that makes them better is they are logging a lot of miles and almost all of those miles are at an easy pace...

                         

                        As Nader said ----- Just run, Just run, Just run.......and I'll throw in - run easy....

                        I never denied the legitimacy of her question.  

                        "If you have the fire, run..." -John Climacus


                        Lazy idiot

                          I never denied the legitimacy of her question.  

                           

                          Don't you have a new addition to dote on?  Wink

                          Tick tock

                            There's no benefit to trying to speed up your average training pace.  The majority of your  mileage, maybe as much as 95% depending on the season, should be at a comfortable easy pace.

                             

                            That said, I think everyone should include some speed at least 1 or 2x per week year round, even if it is just a set of strides or gentle fartlek.

                            Runners run.

                              Don't you have a new addition to dote on?  Wink

                               

                              Heheh. Yes.  Doting hours have been a bit, um, idiosyncratic.  

                               

                              mta: quote. 

                               

                              No disrespect intended, gang. Just know from experience as a relative beginner that's it's easy to get tied up in words and analysis. 

                              "If you have the fire, run..." -John Climacus

                                gentle fartlek.

                                 

                                Heh heh heh.

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