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Core tempeture Drops after a Long Run (Read 1749 times)

Rod Staples


    After running a long run 13 plus miles core temperature drops and I'm freezing its hard to get warmed up.  Its takes a couple hours to get back to normal is it hydration?  Any ideas?


    Feeling the growl again

      What pace are you running?

       

      I would over-dress a bit.  It is common for heat production to start shutting down it you run yourself low on fuel.  So more clothes and/or fuel better for your runs.

      "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

       

        After running a long run 13 plus miles core temperature drops and I'm freezing its hard to get warmed up.  Its takes a couple hours to get back to normal is it hydration?  Any ideas?

         

        This happens to my wife, it's only after running not during.  I can't say she's ever taken her temperature but she is definitely shivering and shaking for at least an hour.  Usually anything over a 2 hour run, sometimes even in temperatures I consider pretty mild, e.g. 50 degrees and she wears clothes that I would sweat in (but she says she is comfortable).  Interestingly enough she does struggle with processing calories, (she'll be starving during a 20 mile run even though she ate breakfast and is taking multiple energy gels).


        A Dance with Monkeys

          How do you know your core temperature is low?  Have you taken your temperature?

           

          The sensation of being cold often accompanies dehydration.

            My temperature drops during a run if the heat index is less than 85 to 90 deg F.  I have no idea why.  I measure temperature with one of those electronic ear temperature gadgets. 

             

            Some data:

            2-17-2011 - 44 deg F: 96.7 deg at start, 95.1 deg at end of 12.5 mile run.  This is my only data point from last winter. 

            7-22-2011 - 85 deg F: 97.6 deg at start, 96.7 deg at end of 6.6 mile run.

            8-3-2011 - 82 deg F: 98.0 deg at start, 96.6 deg at end of 4.5 mile run.

            8-6-2011 - 69 deg F raining: 97.4 deg at start, 95.0 deg at end of 17.5 mile run.

            But not always: 7-10-2011 - 92 deg F 74 deg dew point: 97.6 deg at start, 100.0 deg at end of 5 miles with last 3 miles tempo. 

             

            In winter, I'll come back from a run soaking wet, take a hot shower, then sit around for an hour or two wearing a winter jacket to get warmed back up. 


            HobbyJogger & HobbyRacer

              For whatever it's worth, here's some of my experiences on this subject.

               

              I don't know about my core temperature, but I am very used to having the *feeling* of being cold after a run.

               

              Today I ran in about 70F temp. Felt great during the run. Felt cold afterward -- and I think the feeling of being cold contributes to the coughing I'm having. I got in the car and ran the heat for a while, to feel better. This wasn't a long run or a workout, just a medium run (probably a bit over an hour).

               

              I've done races in the 70s, after which I was cold and ran the heat in the car for an hour during a return drive. I've even had my teeth chattering in the low 70s, I think -- but not after a medium run, only after a race effort or else a long run.

               

              I've swum in water in the low 60s, without wetsuit, and I felt extremely cold both getting in, and afterward. Much colder than I ever feel after running -- violent shivering of the entire body. I've had full-body shivering after running sometimes (but only in 50s or below, I think) -- but never as violently as after swimming in really cold water.

               

              I never heard, til I just read Trent's comment above, that dehydration can cause a feeling of coldness.

              It's a 5k. It hurt like hell...then I tried to pick it up. The end.

                My temperature drops during a run if the heat index is less than 85 to 90 deg F.  I have no idea why.  I measure temperature with one of those electronic ear temperature gadgets.

                I have no idea and am just asking: do those ear-based thermometers work accurately if your ear if COLD, as in just-came-in-from-a-winter-run cold?

                 

                Also, doesn't a hot shower trigger the body's cooling responses?

                “Everything you need is already inside.” -- Bill Bowerman

                  When it's cold I sometimes find that I can get cold at the end of long runs. The solution (for me at least) is to take plenty of gear. A showerproof jacket and gloves and a warm hat can be easily carried if you're warm at the beginning and worn later on if you cool down.

                    I often get quite shivering cold after running 90 minutes or more - I try to slowly warm up (it takes at least an hour), dry off, and put on a pile of sweats after the run before the shower while I eat breakfast and get some coffee. This happens in anything lower than 60*F and I'm a cold weather runner.

                    I can also get uncomfortably cold at the end of a long run in the 2+ hour range...

                     

                    Looking forward to any explanation for this! A

                    Nature is unable to make a really first-class job of anything if she is hustled...

                    Halifax Bluenose 10k May 2014

                    Halifax Navy 5k August 2014

                    Annapolis Valley Harvest, NS  HM October 2014

                       

                      Looking forward to any explanation for this! A

                       

                      I'm no expert but I think the explanation is that glycogen is used in the mechanism by which we regulate our body temparature. As we deplete glycogen stores it becomes harder for the body to keep the temparature up. 

                       

                      But if you're using your muscles then you're generating heat anyway - so if you wear enough clothes you should be able to retain at least as much heat as you're losing because it's cold.


                      day after day sameness

                        I often feel cold after runs, regardless of outside temperature. I don't know anything about what my core temp may be....but I've always assumed that the cause was my body 'overshooting' on its heat shedding efforts when I stop running.

                        Choosing my words carefully has never been my strength I've been known to be vague and often pointless


                        Feeling the growl again

                          This phenomenon has been studied.

                           

                          I would also be interested in the energy store angle.

                          "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                           

                            I feel like running in general has made me better able to tolerate both heat and cold during the days, and I don't usually have chills after a run.  Last week after my long run, however, (and contrary to the ice bath advice), I got in the hot tub.  It felt good, but I felt chilly even as I sat in the hot water.

                            Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

                              This phenomenon has been studied.

                               

                              It's real then.  Keep a blanket handy at the end of your run.  One of these mornings, I'd really like to get back in my nice warm bed, rather than having to ride to work.  34F this morning.

                              Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

                                This phenomenon has been studied.

                                 

                                I would also be interested in the energy store angle.

                                 

                                 

                                That study is interesting, but from the methodology it doesn't really sound like they tested people who were likely to have been exercising long enough to really deplete glycogen stores. A few 2 min bursts on an exercise bike with recoveries. It's not clear how many - each time they upped the power output by 35W until failure. But that's not going to be very many intervals.

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