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Emotional or Meaningful Run Memoirs... (Read 980 times)

    On my last run in Boston...


    It was a Monday. I began my last long run through Boston at 7:30 on clear, summer evening. I took the run slow and easy, making sure to soak up the sights, smells and sounds that pushed against me from all sides. I stopped for a while along the Cambridge side of the Mass Ave Bridge and leaned against the rusty fence. My eyes blurred into the distance as I reflected on my eight years in Boston. I gazed over the calm, dark water at the sparkling city skyline. It had given me my world and I was leaving it. I didn't know exactly why, but I knew I couldn't stay, either. I recalled so many of my runs along the trampled, dusty river ground and the blanket of warm, happy sunshine that had ridden on my back for so many miles. My eyes swelled with tears and the string of christmas lights created by blinking buildings across the river became an iridescent puddle of oil. The colors all mixing together and swirling around and going in and out of focus. Much like my memories of the city I was about to abandon.

     

    I'd love to hear your reflections on a particularly emotional or meaningful run - whether it be your first (or maybe last) marathon, the glory of a pain-free run on return from an injury, a run in a meaningful geographical location or a run with a special person or partner. If it made your heart skip a beat (in a non-running way!) or brought a tear to your eye, it's worth recounting. Anything goes! 

    2012: Just run.


    I'm back!

      I'm not going to repost all the text, but here's a link to my Boston 2009 report, in which I declared I was done with racing "for at least a long while", and why.

       

      http://www.kickrunners.com/t/50530/bhearns-boston-2009-report-my-first-sub-3

       

      Turns out "for at least a long while" was about a year and a half; then I couldn't take it anymore. My second sub-3 was Boston 2011.

        Wow...tried posting this yesterday but apparently technology doesn't like me (the feeling is mutual).

         

        Last December, I hurt my knee quite badly by twisting it on ice.  I kept running, therefore aggravating it even more.  By the end of January I had to take time off for the pain.  When I returned little did I realize I was running differently to baby the knee.  This caused me to hurt my other knee.  Ended up taking a few months off/greatly reduced mileage.  While I was going through this, I realized I had no motivation to do anything, not even run or practice music (music is basically my life).  I thought it was just me, went for 6 mo before I went to a dr and got diagnosed with depression.  

         

        So, the point of this is, July I finally started to resume running regularly, started with 2 days a week and increased slowly.  I believe it was 3 weeks ago, I hit a huge milestone for me, I once again ran over 5k without any pain or desire to stop Smile  I enjoyed running to the fullest again.  It may seem silly to some, but for me it proved that I could face difficulty and overcome, that I wasn`t going to let depression win, that I was stronger than the demons that are after me.  The war may be far from completely over for me, but at least I now know that I can win.  Smile 

        'No matter how slow you go, you're still lapping everyone on the couch'

         

        "Running is a big question mark that's there each and every day. It asks you, 'Are you going to be a wimp or are you going to be strong today?'"  - Peter Maher

         

        "Running long and hard is an ideal antidepressant, since it's hard to run and feel sorry for yourself at the same time. Also, there are those hours of clearheadedness that follow a long run."  -Monte Davis

          I feel like there's at least one a day on these boards (sometimes many more), which is just one reason I like this site.

           

          My own is this: http://www.runningahead.com/forums/post/d3b23fcafa574f2396bd4833e90629cb#focus from a "race" I still think about, almost a year ago...

          Come all you no-hopers, you jokers and rogues
          We're on the road to nowhere, let's find out where it goes

            An excerpt from my Green Bay RR:

             

            Dad:  (This is the running of the Dawgs part)

            DW, DD and I spent Saturday up in Door County. Mom and Dad had visited this area before and Dad loved to bring his bike on these trips. As we drove back to Green Bay I fixated on a past conversation I had with Dad. I can’t recall if it was before or after the brain cancer diagnosis but it was right about the same time. He asked me; “Do people really run an entire marathon…no walking?” “Yep, they do” I told him. “What about you?” He asked, “I’ve had to take some walk breaks…I’ve never fully run one”. He then told me how he had tried to run 2 miles and was unable to cover the distance and how remarkable it must be to actually run an entire 26.2 miles. As I’m dwelling on this thought DD#2 speaks up from the back seat…”Dad…do people really run the marathon the whole way?”…”Yep, they do” …I’m hit with the first wave of goose bumps…”Can you?” was her next question. Wave 2 of goose bumps.  I don't recall my answer to her question.

             

            The Next Day

             

            I’m just over Mile 21. DW and DD#2 are waiting at Mile 21.5. At this point I am running strong. I’m passing people on a regular basis and I know, I really know with unyeilding confidence, that I am going to run this entire marathon, no walking, and I’m thinking about that past conversation...He tried running. He wanted to see what my sisters and I  got out of it. He was in awe of the marathon. He'd probably be running today if time had allowed....As I round the corner and approach the bridge where DW and DD are I see Lorri (DW) holding up a sign. It reads…”Your Mom Called”. Lorri flips it over and the other side reads…”Run for the Old Dawg”. Man, I feel like I've just been blasted with ice water.

             

            Those final miles were pretty damn emotional. I did run every step. And it was the easiest marathon I have ever run. I had a damn good running partner. Coming across the finish line and trying to maintain my composure was the toughest. Volunteers kept directing me to the medical tent.

             

            And now I'm crying again...

            www.hplg.net  The Human Powered League - Solo Cup Series - Trail Building

              Last year's Twin Cities Marathon was probably the sweetest run for me ever.  It was my first real race after knee surgery 18 months earlier.  I was overjoyed, surprised, & pleased beyond belief to PR by a huge margin on that beautiful, crisp Minnesota morning, and my dad and my oldest son were there with me to share the experience.  Rich beyond measure.

               

              - Joe

              all running goals are under review by the executive committee.

                It may seem silly to some....

                 

                Not silly at all.  Smile

                - Joe

                all running goals are under review by the executive committee.

                  My first long run was the 2009 White Rock Marathon in Dallas, TX.  The race is held in December, and supports Scottish Rite Hospital for Children (TSRHC).  I have 2 sons, and both of them are long time patients at Scottish Rite.

                   

                  (I need to provide some background before I speak of race day...)

                  In January, 2009, after many years of struggling with an undiagnosed medical mystery, our doctors found the needle in the haystack.  A diagnosis was discovered for our boys, and we were on a path to proper treatment.  My wife and I were very excited to know that a team of doctor's, researchers, and personnel were all committed to finding the solution to their challenge.  Finally, after 7+ years of waiting, we got the answer.

                   

                  Soon after, we decided to give back to Scottish Rite.

                   

                  In July, 2009, I signed up for the race, and decided to raise money for the hospital and raise awareness within the communities that we're a part of to let them know that TSRHC (and other hospitals like it) make a difference to the community they serve.  Over the following months, I invited my Facebook friends, my running community friends, my church friends, my neighbors and my family to make a difference in the lives of some of the children in our community.  By race day, my wife and I had raised about $3,000, and broadcast to many others who did not give financially about the wonders of TSRHC.

                   

                  On December 13, 2009, I set off to run the full marathon while my wife set off to run the half marathon.  We were very prepared for race day, knowing that, for both of us, this was a significant stretch for us physically.  My main goal was to finish the race with my hands held high, knowing that I did a little to help a lot.  But I got so much more out of that run....

                   

                  The actual miles were somewhat uneventful.  I remember the people, exactly where I was at the starting line.  I remember running along some stretches of the roads, the volunteers that held up kayak paddles directing traffic.  I remember the run around the lake, and the morning fog over the lake.  I remember the boy scouts manning a water station at mile 18, and I remember running along some guy who was in a heck of a lot of pain.  I remember the incredible pain I felt as well.

                   

                  Mostly, though, I remember the memories of the training and the thought that what we were doing was bigger than a 3:43:45 race.  I remember the time spent running with my wife and my training buddies doing the "tour de Flo Mo" every Saturday morning, and the desire to give back to what I believe in. 

                   

                  I limped the last 3 miles to the finish line and wasn't properly prepared for the pacing challenges early in the race (went too fast).  But, I did cross the finish line with both arms over my head celebrating the victory of my first marathon that supported such an awesome cause! 

                  MTA: And every day, I see a reminder of the last 5 foot of the race with my arms raised high as I enter into my office, not recalling the previous 26.19 miles of pain I felt to get there.

                   

                  Since the race 2 years ago, I've continued to challenge myself so that, by doing what I do, my children (both with minor physical challenges) can realize that nothing is impossible!

                   

                  (BTW, I'd like to encourage all DFW friends as well as friends who would like to travel to Dallas in early December to run the WRM to support TSRHC... www.runtherock.com).


                  Cheers,
                  Brian

                  2014 Goals:

                  #1: Do what I can do. <DOING>

                  #2: 365 Hours training <NOPE, INJURED>

                   

                  DoppleBock


                    The morning of my Mother's funeral - It was a crisp October morning - perfect running weather.  We had an early start and a long day in front of us, so I went out at 4:00am.  The city streets were empty, so I ran right down the middle of any road I pleased.  Just floating along at a very fast pace - Everything was quiet except my breath and heart beat.  The effort and rythm enveloped me and a great peace came over my mind and soul.

                    http://a-big-horse.blogspot.com/ 

                    2013 Goals ~ Mar < 3:00, 5M < 29, 10k < 35  

                     

                      DB, wow.  Powerful stuff.

                       

                      Slo_Hand, yours, too. 

                       

                      p.s., you guys gave me goose bumps.

                      - Joe

                      all running goals are under review by the executive committee.

                        I'm not going to repost all the text, but here's a link to my Boston 2009 report, in which I declared I was done with racing "for at least a long while", and why.

                         

                        http://www.kickrunners.com/t/50530/bhearns-boston-2009-report-my-first-sub-3

                         

                        Turns out "for at least a long while" was about a year and a half; then I couldn't take it anymore. My second sub-3 was Boston 2011.

                         

                        Your thoughts in that "report" hit too close to home for me, especially the part about running consuming too much of my mind. 

                        Glad your back!


                        Just a dude.

                          I have no idea why this is such a big deal for me, but I tear up every time I tell the story... 

                           

                          It's my junior year of high school... Middle of the track season.  We went to a big meet down in Sacramento. (Rio Linda)

                           

                          My main race was the 3200 (2 mile) which ended up being late in the day.  The meet ran slow and it ended up being even later than normal.  We had brought a school bus and a school van to get everyone to the meet.  The coaches decided that they would load the bus up so the kids would get home at a decent hour.  I still had my race, and there were four others that didn't fit on the bus and my coach.

                           

                          Race finally starts, and I'm running along at the front of the pack... My coach is running back and forth across the infield cheering me on, and the other 4 kids were cheering for me at one of the corners...

                           

                          About a mile into the race, the coach tells the other 4 kids that I am on school record pace. They spread out so that each one was on a different corner of the track, and started cheering like crazy.  They weren't distance runners... They were jumpers and hurdlers and I don't even remember who all...

                           

                          As I came down to the last lap, there were only two of us left in the race.  I gave it everything I had, but ended up second.  But in the process I shattered the school record by 13 seconds... Only race I've seen where the guy in 2nd place was happier than the guy that won.

                           

                          The six of us shared the roughly three hour van ride back home...  I'm sure we talked about the race over and over, but they never got tired of talking about it.

                           

                          I ran faster than that in high school... I ran in bigger meets and won state championships... Not sure entirely why, but almost can't tell this story now 20+ years later without crying...

                           

                          -Kelly

                          Getting back in shape... Just need it to be a skinnier shape... 

                            Hey Kelly, I, for one, get it. 

                             

                            And dang.  If you won state championships (especially in California), u da man.

                            - Joe

                            all running goals are under review by the executive committee.

                              Hey Kelly, I, for one, get it. 

                               

                              And dang.  If you won state championships (especially in California), u da man.

                               

                              agreed! Great story, Kelly! 


                              Just a dude.

                                Hey Kelly, I, for one, get it. 

                                 

                                And dang.  If you won state championships (especially in California), u da man.

                                 

                                Well, I won state championships in Nevada... So it was probably more of a "u da teenager" then a true man... Wink

                                 

                                -Kelly

                                Getting back in shape... Just need it to be a skinnier shape... 

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