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Weight vs. Speed (Read 488 times)

    shipo,

     

    we have a similar history & in same AG.  (58 in October.) with proper balance in training plan & healty diet you can accomplish your goals in weight loss & racing times.   over last 5 yrs after getting back into a more consistent running/strength training program I've lost around 50 lbs & lowered my 5k times by over 5 mns.  1st 3 or so mns came fairly quickly (within yr or so) but then improvement slowed down ( set new 5k PR on July 4th of this yr).      As you continue to lose weight be sure you continue with some sort of weight training program to complement your running so as not to lose lean muscle mass.

     

    Thanks for your post; your experience is both interesting and instructional.  Cool

     

    Regarding a 5K PR, I strongly suspect I'll never set a new PR in that distance (or any other "normal" race distance for that matter) as I ran exactly one 5K as a young adult and I finished that race in 16:21 (I was shooting for sub-16, but it was a very warm and humid Atlanta morning and my target time wasn't to be).  I'm thinking I'm going to need to hit the "Reset" button on all of my PRs and/or start a new group of them for my 50-59 Age Group years.  Approve

     

    Regarding a weight training program, I've never in my life done a weight training program per-se, however, I live in a "Care-Taker" unit on a 70-acre horse farm and between mucking out a half of a ton of horse poop per week, I do a lot of fetching and carrying of 50 pound grain bags, bails of hay, and of course the daily push-pull of moving horses around (some are very well behaved and will do what I want with the lightest of a touch, others have to be muscled around).  Hopefully that counts for something.  Big grin

      Running a 5K in under 20 min. will be a breeze for you in no time. You just gotta stick with it.

       

      Wow, I love your optimism; I sure hope you're right!  Big grin

      JimR


        manfromnantucket


          If the cat sticks with it he'll be fine. Warm and humid days are drag indeed to run in, we had a few days like that up here this summer. On days like that i just grab a six pack and head to the beach.

          runlikeagirI


               

              Read here:

               

              http://www.runningahead.com/forums/topic/f52a3b90b0d248299017ac88288ce4cd/0

               

              Ummm, I'm not sure how that thread helps me; I may be able to run a sub-20 minute 5K in the next year or two, but I'm never going to be seeing anything approaching 14 minutes.

              manfromnantucket


                Don't sweat it, 20 min. is fine too. Apparently  there  aren't alot of people who can do it either. I just happen to be able to do it with some frequency. I just don't race though, i like to run down by the water and have a good time.

                JimR


                  Don't sweat it, 20 min. is fine too. Apparently  there  aren't alot of people who can do it either. I just happen to be able to do it with some frequency. I just don't race though, i like to run down by the water and have a good time.

                  Well, it seems that other site trips some alarm bells so I'm going to remove the info and reference.


                  delicate flower

                    I ran my first 5K in 27:35 at 202 lbs.  I had been running for a month.  8 months later I ran a 5K in 22:20 at 152 lbs.  So my pace went from 8:52 to 7:11, or 20 seconds for every 10 pounds lost.  WEIRD.  Surprised

                    roboknee.

                      I don't know, maybe I'm missing something, but a 14 minute 5K sounds pretty darned fast to me.  Back in 1979 I ran a 5K on a warm humid (so humid you could only see maybe twenty feet in front of you) in 16:21, and I got third place in the race; I have no idea what time the winner had, but I'm betting it was no faster than 15:30.

                       

                      Maybe it's just me, but I know (or at least knew) what it takes to run a 4:30 mile; stringing three "point" one  4:30s together sounds, ummm, a bit improbable for someone who just started running again.

                       

                      To borrow a line from the car racing community, "Certified race results or it didn't happen."

                        I ran my first 5K in 27:35 at 202 lbs.  I had been running for a month.  8 months later I ran a 5K in 22:20 at 152 lbs.  So my pace went from 8:52 to 7:11, or 20 seconds for every 10 pounds lost.  WEIRD.  Surprised

                         

                        Dude, you da man; that's exactly the kind of thing I was hoping to hear when I started this thread.  Big grin

                          One more data point:  I went from 22:40-ish 5k's at 180 lbs to 21:30-ish after losing 10 lbs this Spring.

                          2014 goals:   •  1st Marathon  •  3,000 miles

                            One more data point:  I went from 22:40-ish 5k's at 180 lbs to 21:30-ish after losing 10 lbs this Spring.

                             

                            Wow, I'm impressed.  How old and how tall are you?

                              Here's one more data point that is not from a new to running perspective.  I was a very experienced runner when I started racing 5K.  I ran a 6:15-paced 5K at 167lbs (when I first started racing 5K) and then 4 years later 5:46-paced 5K at 147 pounds.  So 11 seconds short of that "rule-of-thumb" even though I was much better trained than I was 4 years ago but, still, very significant.  I'm also 4 years older at an age when 4 years makes a very big difference so there's that.


                              Feeling the growl again

                                ~7lbs made the difference between 17:00 and 16:16 5K, and ~35:30 and 34:18 10K for me.  All else was in fact held pretty equal and I'd been running the same times for 3 years.

                                 

                                Increased mileage had 2-3X as much impact, however.  But it's easier on you to run more once the weight is off.

                                "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                                 

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