So would anyone care to explain VO2... (Read 2242 times)


I've got a fever...

    If you're running less than 50 miles a week then the best way to improve your VO2max (not the Trent definition but the spaniel definition (and the definition that nearly everyone in the running world uses and understands when they say VO2max) is to simply run more. No workouts you can do will have nearly the same impact as just adding more miles.
    Fixed. Well said, Mikey.

    On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.


    Just Be

      No! You've fallen for Trent's B.S. Your VO2max, as spaniel said, is your max now, at this point in time. It has nothing to do with your mythical "potential," which obviously can never be measured.
      For some reason the theory of relativity comes to mind.


      Right on Hereford...

        Yup. And that's elites. Us normal types are never, ever going to do enough training for it to even be a consideration. Whatever my VO2max may be, whether its fixed or changeable, has exactly zero impact.
        JK, you don't have to know your VO2max, but improving it will make you a better runner, right? At least at 5k distances or less. Everest asked a legitimate question (one that's already been answered on this thread, but nonetheless...Smile) about how to improve VO2max. The short answer is by doing a certain type of intervals. This can make you significantly faster in a short period of time. For example, I used this type of workout to help take me from a 21:08 5k to a 19:30 in a little over a month last year. But these types of improvements tend to plateau quickly as well. The long answer (well, I guess I mean the "other" short answer) is "run more," as MikeyMike says. And this is the answer that will lead to the best long-term results.


        I've got a fever...

          The short answer is by doing a certain type of intervals. This can make you significantly faster in a short period of time. For example, I used this type of workout to help take me from a 21:08 5k to a 19:30 in a little over a month last year. But these types of improvements tend to plateau quickly as well.
          Yup. Intervals at slightly faster than 5k pace (so usually 2~5 minutes in length), with recoveries equal to or shorter than the duration of the interval. But you shouldn't do these until you've built a really solid base. One of my old coaches told me no speedwork until at least 40~45 miles/week of base. I Choose to ignore that now, to my detriment, but I do agree with it.

          On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.

            Roll eyes Just plain unbelievable.
            E-mail: JakeKnight2002@aol.com
            -----------------------------


            Right on Hereford...

              Yup. Intervals at slightly faster than 5k pace (so usually 2~5 minutes in length), with recoveries equal to or shorter than the duration of the interval. But you shouldn't do these until you've built a really solid base. One of my old coaches told me no speedwork until at least 40~45 miles/week of base. I Choose to ignore that now, to my detriment, but I do agree with it.
              Yep, that's probably a good guideline (for injury prevention, I'm guessing), but I was only running 30 miles per week last year when I was doing those intervals, myself! And it did work...
              C-R


                Roll eyes Just plain unbelievable.
                At least Freddy Kruger didn't come back after the fourth movie. This thing is more survivable than a roach since obviously nuclear fission wasn't enough to kill it. Dead


                "He conquers who endures" - Persius
                "Every workout should have a purpose. Every purpose should link back to achieving a training objective." - Spaniel

                http://ncstake.blogspot.com/


                Feeling the growl again

                  Reading that article would seem to give strength to the assertion that a true VO2 max is almost untestable because the athlete fails before a max is reached. A maximum effort before failure can be tested but unless every related system in the test subject's body is 100% efficient then something is always going to fail before a true result can be given. A system is only as strong as it's weakest point. It's like taking the oil from an engine and then trying to measure peak horsepower. It might even be possible that the muscular system will never be efficient enough to reach a theoretical max.
                  True for more unfit people -- they can't reach VO2max. More fit people have no problem doing it.

                  "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                   


                  Feeling the growl again

                    So based on the readings here and the repeat answers drilled into us, most of are therefore not in shape because we don't have the time or training knowledge or desire, and we can't possibly know are V02 max because any type of test would be sub maximal, so because we are not maximal, we could improve upon our V02 max somewhat because it is probably not at max. Having pointed this out, what would be the best or quickest way to improve our VO2 max scores while having a minimal amount of time, for example, lose weight, do more long runs, do interval runs or 800 to 1200 meters and what can be expected of the types of training.
                    1) Intervals - fastest, 800m-1000m sweet spot (400m for slower runners too), short recoveries 2) Lose weight 3) Distance The problem is that, if we look at what will generate more improvement in the LONG term, and reduce the importance of time constraints, you have to reverse the list! Intervals only help you for about 2 months at ANY mileage and then you will plateau (if doing them right). The only way to reach the next level is distance...

                    "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand