So would anyone care to explain VO2... (Read 2241 times)

    I also hear that running more is more beneficial to distance runners than not running more. Does anybody know of any peer-reviewed studies on this?

    Runners run.


    The Greatest of All Time

      I also hear that running more is more beneficial to distance runners than not running more. Does anybody know of any peer-reviewed studies on this?
      I do. It's in the Global Exercise Training Manual. Volume II, page 44.
      all you touch and all you see, is all your life will ever be

      Obesity is a disease. Yes, a disease where nothing tastes bad...except salads.


      Lazy idiot

        I do. It's in the Global Exercise Training Manual. Volume II, page 44.
        I see you've been browsing the Swamp Library. Sorry we didn't have the title you were looking for this morning, but the Global Exercise Training Manual, Vol. II is a good one as well.

        Tick tock


        I've got a fever...

          What you've said is one of the most insanely idiotic things I have ever heard. At no point in your rambling, incoherent response were you even close to anything that could be considered a rational thought. Everyone in this room is now dumber for having listened to it. I award you no points, and may God have mercy on your soul.
          Scout, You should just put the above in your footer. Then, all you have to do for your post is type the person's name followed by a comma. Very efficient.

          On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.


          A Dance with Monkeys

            Idiot. It is on page 42.


            The Greatest of All Time

              I see you've been browsing the Swamp Library. Sorry we didn't have the title you were looking for this morning, but the Global Exercise Training Manual, Vol. II is a good one as well.
              Big grin
              Idiot. It is on page 42.
              Looks like you should review it. Idiot.
              all you touch and all you see, is all your life will ever be

              Obesity is a disease. Yes, a disease where nothing tastes bad...except salads.


              Right on Hereford...

                Quote from bdags on 8/19/2008 at 7:58 AM: I did a Google search on Vo2 Max. I randomly selected 5 or 6 articles, and each and every one of them states that Vo2 Max can be increased with training.
                Oh. Then I guess it must be so.
                Trent, you're just f'ing with us, right? You don't REALLY believe that VO2max is "fixed for life," do you? My own quick Google search revealed... 1. The subjects trained to exhaustion four times per week. Maximal oxygen consumption (Vo2max), lactate threshold (Tlac) and ventilatory threshold (Tvent) were determined before and after the training programme. After training, there were significant increases (P < 0.05)="" in="" vo2max="" (5%="" and="" /> http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=1332151 2. Exercise conditioning can improve the VO2max by augmenting both the cardiac output and the oxygen extraction within the capillaries. http://ajs.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/12/4/268?maxtoshow=&HITS=10&hits=10&RESULTFORMAT=&fulltext=vo2+max&searchid=1&FIRSTINDEX=10&sortspec=relevance&resourcetype=HWCIT 3. A mean increase of 29% in VO2 max of intervention subjects who exercised aerobically for at least 30 minutes 5 days/week was significant (P = .02) compared to the control group. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18383987?ordinalpos=10&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum 4. Aging is associated with a progressive decline in the capacity for physical activity. Central to this decline is a reduction in the maximal rate of oxygen utilization, or VO2 max. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18347663?ordinalpos=13&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum 5. Long-term exercise training decreased body weight and BMI, and increased VO2 max. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18295822?ordinalpos=18&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum 6. At 2 years maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max) increased by 10% in the ET (Exercise Training) group http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18277195?ordinalpos=20&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum
                  This thread is now overrun with the unmentionables. Pity. I had high hopes we were close to the truth.
                  "Good-looking people have no spine. Their art never lasts. They get the girls, but we're smarter." - Lester Bangs


                  Right on Hereford...

                    Hey spaniel, thanks for your thoughts. I agree with everything you say except this: what you are describing as VO2max is really submax VO2. The true VO2max is your VO2 measured at both maximal sustained exertion and maximal personal fitness.
                    Good one, Trent! Big grin Where on earth did you get this idea?
                    Just to be clear, those of you still engaged in a pedantic discussion of VO2max are doing so for fun, right? Because you're scientists or whatever and you enjoy this stuff? Right?
                    Mikey, yes!


                    A Dance with Monkeys

                      You people are far too much fun. BTW, pick good journals next time, not just those that publish LPUs.


                      Right on Hereford...

                        You people are far too much fun. BTW, pick good journals next time, not just those that publish LPUs.
                        I have no idea what an "LPU" is, but if you have an actual argument, please state it.


                        A Dance with Monkeys

                          LPU = least publishable unit. Every manuscript has a home.


                          A Dance with Monkeys

                            Or, put differently: How can we say the same thing about the same objects but mean different things? Consider the following two expressions: 1) The morning star is low in the sky. 2) The evening star is low in the sky. These expressions refer to the same object (Venus), yet the sense of meaning conveyed by the two expressions is very different (consider the implicit time of day conveyed by the expressions). Ogden and Richards, and later Campbell, recognized the importance of the meaningful nuance among the terms that implied different contexts, but did not provide a direct framework for modeling these differences. Rather, their focus was to provide a model for distinguishing words from entities, regardless of context
                            obsessor


                              I also hear that running more is more beneficial to distance runners than not running more. Does anybody know of any peer-reviewed studies on this?
                              I've heard that, too. Is it also true, that after you've run for a while, and amass some decent mileage, and you're running every day or almost, you should add in a couple of hill days? I mean, to gain strength and stuff, and to help increase your fitness and if you want to get faster? Also, it uses a bunch of oxygen when you run up those hills, right?


                              Right on Hereford...

                                LPU = least publishable unit. Every manuscript has a home.
                                I guess you're admitting defeat? Wink