Increase speed or increase distance? (Read 1289 times)

AlexaCT


    I originally started running a few months ago, following the C25K program.  I finished that in October and moved on to the C210K trainer.  I've been adding distance on pretty rapidly; I went from barely running 3 miles in early November to running an awesome 5.25 miles today.  I'm finding the increase in distance to be pretty easy and really enjoyable.  However, I'm still slow as anything.  I only run a 11:30-12:00m/m, no matter the distance.  On a good day, I'll run my first mile in 10min, but then mile 2 is back to 12 min, and I'm cooked before I even hit mile 3.

     

    So....my question for you:

    Should I work on increasing my speed before increasing my mileage?  Does it matter if I'm a slowpoke, but I'm able to run for a longer period of time?

     

    Short term, I'm looking to run a HM in May, with a bucket list goal to run a full at some point (no rush on that).

     

    Thanks in advance!

    I can and I will!

      If your looking at doing a HM,I'd go for distance. Speed will come with time/milage.

      Biking Bad


      finnegan begin again

        milage.    until you get your weekly and long run distance up, you should just concentrate on getting out there and running.  After you've built a base you can work on speed.

         

         It's fun to dwell on tempos and fartleks and intervals. Those are best built on a body of work from your base. It's hard to have the patience to build a base though. 

         

         I find it hard to not run fast though. Speed makes it interesting for me. I'm self destructive. Hence a running drought from injury.

         

        Running sucks

        "... the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph. What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly: it is dearness only that gives every thing its value..."  Thomas Paine Dec 23, 1776 The Crisis 

         

        Adversity is the first path to truth. Lord Byron

          I'd keep building mileage and consistency. Consistency is a big factor. 

          "Don't feel like running today...suck it up and run ...you're an athlete." (John Stanton, founder & owner of The Running Room)

           

          "The person who starts the race is not the same person who finishes the race."

          Longboat


          Letting off steam

            +1 to mileage.  

            You'll need endurance far more than speed to run a half.
            As Drake said, you'll get faster with time/mileage.  Your body will learn that just by running.

            Neil

            ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

            Nearly back to 100% 6 months after Achilles surgery. Now at 35 50 mpw.

            Base building time!

            vegefrog


              Ditto what everyone else said.

               

              If you add the mileage, steadily and slowly, the speed will come naturally.

              cookiemonster


              Connoisseur of Cookies

                Agreed.  Increase your mileage and develop a good aerobic base.  When you get closer to race time you can start adding some speed work into your workouts.  But for now?  Add mileage.

                ***************************************************************************************

                 

                "C" is for cookie.  That's good enough for me.


                Feeling the growl again

                   

                  Should I work on increasing my speed before increasing my mileage?  Does it matter if I'm a slowpoke, but I'm able to run for a longer period of time?

                   

                  False dichotomy.  

                   

                  With respect to your everyday running pace, increasing mileage WILL increase your speed.  Much more so, in the long term, than trying to do speedwork on what little base you have now.

                  "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                   

                    I originally started running a few months ago, following the C25K program.  I finished that in October and moved on to the C210K trainer.  I've been adding distance on pretty rapidly; I went from barely running 3 miles in early November to running an awesome 5.25 miles today.  I'm finding the increase in distance to be pretty easy and really enjoyable.  However, I'm still slow as anything.  I only run a 11:30-12:00m/m, no matter the distance.  On a good day, I'll run my first mile in 10min, but then mile 2 is back to 12 min, and I'm cooked before I even hit mile 3.

                     

                    So....my question for you:

                    Should I work on increasing my speed before increasing my mileage?  Does it matter if I'm a slowpoke, but I'm able to run for a longer period of time?

                     

                    Short term, I'm looking to run a HM in May, with a bucket list goal to run a full at some point (no rush on that).

                     

                    Thanks in advance!

                    I'd actually vote for BOTH.  But when I say "speed", I'm not talking about some gut-wrecking fire-sucking intervals like repeat 800m or 1km or something like that.  So you are about an hour right now.  You are in a perfect position to work on BOTH stamina by doing lots of easy miles AND learning to run fast by incorporating some nice and easy but FAST strides.  At your level, I'd keep it to something like 3-5 X 50m for now.  Even shorter, 30m???  But get up on your toes, lift your knees, push off well with your back leg...lift up your pelvis.  RUN TALL AND LIGHT ON HYOUR FEET.  This would teach you to "run correctly" so as to eliminate injury possibilities later once you start to stack up more miles.

                     

                    The sooner you learn to be light on your feet and run tall, in other words, more economical and smooth, the better.  I don't give a damn about what anybody else might say; there's no fun in plodding.  

                     

                    Just do this once a week.  Never ever get yourself in a breathless state.  If you start to suck air and your form goes out the window, reduce the distance.  Even down to 20m if necessary.  Just take plenty of recovery by walking back or very slowly jogging back to the start; even take some more--at least a minute; or once you lengthen the distance up to 100m, 2-3 minutes.  Don't rush it.  You don't want to be struggling--that's what most people who never learnt to run fast would do.  You want to learn to run FAST while RELAXED.  Rest of the week; just go for a nice easy long jog.  Never worry about how fast or slow you do those runs.  THAT, the time will come down as you get fitter.

                     

                    Intervals are a different story.  That can wait till a month or so before the target race.  But speed, you need to start working on it from the get-go.  The sooner you can master it, the better.

                    AlexaCT


                      Thanks everyone.  I appreciate the advice.  I've been feeling really good the last couple weeks with my progress and I am hoping to just stick with it.  Glad to know I don't need to really worry about the speed just yet.

                       

                      As I'm typing this, my husband (a non-runner, but will accompany me sometimes) looked over and asked what I was doing.  I told him the question I asked, and he immediately responded, "Oh, increase speed".  I told him you guys said otherwise, and he said, "Well, do they know how SLOW you are?"

                       

                      Shocked

                       

                      Thanks, honey.

                      I can and I will!


                      Mmmmm...beer

                        +1 for mileage.  I've done nothing but base building since I started running 8 months ago, zero speed work, every run I do is easy.  My easy pace has dropped from around 11:30/mile to around 8:00/mile, and I averaged 6:37/mile at my 5K last week.  Keep logging the miles, the speed will come.

                        -Dave

                         

                        2014 Goals | sub-19 5k done! | sub-40 10k | sub-1:25 HM | BQ done! | sub-3 M

                        AnnQ


                          I'd actually vote for BOTH.  But when I say "speed", I'm not talking about some gut-wrecking fire-sucking intervals like repeat 800m or 1km or something like that.  So you are about an hour right now.  You are in a perfect position to work on BOTH stamina by doing lots of easy miles AND learning to run fast by incorporating some nice and easy but FAST strides.  At your level, I'd keep it to something like 3-5 X 50m for now.  Even shorter, 30m???  But get up on your toes, lift your knees, push off well with your back leg...lift up your pelvis.  RUN TALL AND LIGHT ON HYOUR FEET.  This would teach you to "run correctly" so as to eliminate injury possibilities later once you start to stack up more miles.

                           

                          The sooner you learn to be light on your feet and run tall, in other words, more economical and smooth, the better.  I don't give a damn about what anybody else might say; there's no fun in plodding.  

                           

                          Just do this once a week.  Never ever get yourself in a breathless state.  If you start to suck air and your form goes out the window, reduce the distance.  Even down to 20m if necessary.  Just take plenty of recovery by walking back or very slowly jogging back to the start; even take some more--at least a minute; or once you lengthen the distance up to 100m, 2-3 minutes.  Don't rush it.  You don't want to be struggling--that's what most people who never learnt to run fast would do.  You want to learn to run FAST while RELAXED.  Rest of the week; just go for a nice easy long jog.  Never worry about how fast or slow you do those runs.  THAT, the time will come down as you get fitter.

                           

                          Intervals are a different story.  That can wait till a month or so before the target race.  But speed, you need to start working on it from the get-go.  The sooner you can master it, the better.

                           

                          I second this.  Not too much with the speed training, but it's all to easy to get in a rut and never really see that speed-up.  Yes, you need endurance to run faster longer, but doing some running at different paces even from early months is a fine idea.


                          Future running partner.

                            Speed work should be very limited at this stage in your running but you do need it. The way I see it is building up your mileage is building a strong foundation for you to handle tougher workouts later on. You can't build a house with a weak foundation or it will crumble. Base training doesn't always mean slow easy running. Strides and pickups in the middle of a run will help you learn to run faster, smoother and more efficiently, but will allow you to do it aerobically. Like Nobby said when doing any speed work at this point just don't let yourself get gassed.

                            jmctav23


                            2/3rds training

                              increase distance, and start making friends with hills and strides, or strides up hills.  Running hilly routes will build leg strength on the way up and force you to practise faster leg turn over on the way down, both things will come in handy later.

                              dallison


                              registered pw

                                Increase mileage.

                                2013 goals:

                                sub 19 5k

                                sub 1:30 half

                                3:20 marathon on second try