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Fuel belt immobilization (Read 1364 times)

    Last weekend, within 1.5kms into my long run, my Nathan 4-bottle hydration belt undid itself thrice. I figured that since it was 2 years old, it had expanded and was no longer as tight as it should be and so i headed out yesterday and got myself a Fuel Belt (4-bottle version), 'M' size. In my LSD yesterday, much to my chargin, i found out that the new fuel belt kept riding up from the hips on to the waist and there was nothing i could do to make it just stay in one place. I googled around and saw some allusions to material of the running top being the cause as well as incorrect sizing of the belt itself. I know for a fact that the belt i have is the right size for me. I cant put it down to the material of the running tee yet .. so can anybody here please help with solutions to this problem? I am really keen on making sure that the fuel belt stays in place as Singapore is very humid and i cant afford to go long distances without water.

    I dont sweat. I ooze liquid awesome.

      Camelback style water carriers are better, but they're also slightly overkill when you only need a few hundred ml of water. Also they can be a bit hot.

        Last weekend, within 1.5kms into my long run, my Nathan 4-bottle hydration belt undid itself thrice. I figured that since it was 2 years old, it had expanded and was no longer as tight as it should be and so i headed out yesterday and got myself a Fuel Belt (4-bottle version), 'M' size. In my LSD yesterday, much to my chargin, i found out that the new fuel belt kept riding up from the hips on to the waist and there was nothing i could do to make it just stay in one place. I googled around and saw some allusions to material of the running top being the cause as well as incorrect sizing of the belt itself. I know for a fact that the belt i have is the right size for me. I cant put it down to the material of the running tee yet .. so can anybody here please help with solutions to this problem? I am really keen on making sure that the fuel belt stays in place as Singapore is very humid and i cant afford to go long distances without water.

        One of my favorite "Seinfeld" episodes is when George was swimming and...well, a shrinkage factor!!  Ellain came in and said something like; "I don't know how you guys can walk around with that thing..."  That's actually how I feel about those water bottles.  My wife uses it; but I don't and I probably would never use it--it just does not look comfortable...and necessary.

         

        Bottles or camelback or whatever, as long as we get airborne while running, I don't think there's much we can do to make it "immobile".  It will bounce around one way or the other.  There was a time in my early life when I had to run with a backpack.  That just was not comfortable.  

         

        I've run in Singapore before and I know how humid it is.  But actually humidity and dehydration may not be as closely related.  When it's so humid, your sweat wouldn't evaporate as much; in other words, your skin would stay wet and, because of that, you won't be dehydrating as much.  As a matter of fact, you feel uncomfortable NOT because you are dehydrating but because, because of lack of water evaporation of the skin, you keep the heat within.  You would probably be better off if you just dump water over your head instead of drinking it.  Well, I guess you'd need water either way.  I would personally prefer setting out the running route where you know there's a water fountain along the way (park, etc.).  What I used to do is to freeze a bottled water the night before and drive over the course and place it somewhere around 2/3 of the way,  That way, by the time you get there, it's almost melted and you get to drink icy cold water.  

         

        As far as I'm concerned, those water bottle belt is very much highly driven by marketing and not as necessary as you may think or some media may try to make you believe.

          That's actually how I feel about those water bottles.  My wife uses it; but I don't and I probably would never use it--it just does not look comfortable...and necessary.

           

          Bottles or camelback or whatever, as long as we get airborne while running, I don't think there's much we can do to make it "immobile".  It will bounce around one way or the other.  There was a time in my early life when I had to run with a backpack.  That just was not comfortable.  

           

          I've run in Singapore before and I know how humid it is.  But actually humidity and dehydration may not be as closely related.  When it's so humid, your sweat wouldn't evaporate as much; in other words, your skin would stay wet and, because of that, you won't be dehydrating as much.  As a matter of fact, you feel uncomfortable NOT because you are dehydrating but because, because of lack of water evaporation of the skin, you keep the heat within.  You would probably be better off if you just dump water over your head instead of drinking it.  Well, I guess you'd need water either way.  I would personally prefer setting out the running route where you know there's a water fountain along the way (park, etc.).  What I used to do is to freeze a bottled water the night before and drive over the course and place it somewhere around 2/3 of the way,  That way, by the time you get there, it's almost melted and you get to drink icy cold water.  

           

          As far as I'm concerned, those water bottle belt is very much highly driven by marketing and not as necessary as you may think or some media may try to make you believe.

           

          There are plenty of routes where it's just not practical to leave water so you have to go without or carry some.

           

          In the winter I'm relaxed about running for a couple of hours without water, but in the height of summer you soon start to feel thirsty.

           

          I agree that the whole "drink early and drink often thing" is overplayed, but still - running for a couple of hours in the heat without water mostly seems like gratuitous masochism to me. If you don't get thirsty in these situations, then fine - but I think most people do.

            There are plenty of routes where it's just not practical to leave water so you have to go without or carry some.

             

            In the winter I'm relaxed about running for a couple of hours without water, but in the height of summer you soon start to feel thirsty.

             

            I agree that the whole "drink early and drink often thing" is overplayed, but still - running for a couple of hours in the heat without water mostly seems like gratuitous masochism to me. If you don't get thirsty in these situations, then fine - but I think most people do.

            Unless it's an extreme condition, I really don't think you really NEED to hydrate during the run.  And I really can't think of many routes that's not practical to leave water bottle.  If it's in the city, chances are there are some water fountain.  If you are worried about a dog or chipmunk coming out and peeing on the bottle if you hide it in the bush, well, that may be a problem.

             

            I can think of many other things that's a lot more masochistic than not carrying water bottles around your waist.  Perhaps running 3 or 4 hours every weekend to prepare for a marathon may be one of them.  In fact, I would classify carrying water bottles around your waist when you run more than 2 hours being one of them too.  Consider people were running long distances way before anybody "invented" water bottle belt.

              Thanks pr100/Nobby for the inputs.

               

              pr100 - I do have a 2L NF backpack but its an overkill for me cos i bought it mostly for trail ultras. Also mine has only one water bag so i can only take water in it. However on the fuel belt, i split 2 bottles each between water and electrolyte. I run the first half on electrolyet and the second half on water + gel on the long runs. Having said that, i try to not use any gels when i run long or have started to train to make the body adapt to greater fat burn + carb use than taking in gels regularly.

               

              Nobby - There are a couple of routes here where i can run long and still afford to lose the hydration pack (East Coast Park for example, if you have been there) but in the route i  ran yesterday, it would have been quite difficult. Its just that carrying the hydration belt gives me the feeling of being self sufficient in running as long as i want. And when i used to run with the Nathan belt when it was still new, it wasnt a problem. I cant figure out what the issue is now.

               

              By the way, weekend before last when i ran long, i took in just about half a litre of water while running for 2.5 hours and this was only because there was a thin drizzle throughout the run and that kept it cool. So i understand your point when you say its a good alternative to splash water over the body than drink it (but of course with  the usual caveats of this not being an absolute replacement).

               

              Will try stuffing a towel around the hydration pack and see if that prevents it from riding up.

              I dont sweat. I ooze liquid awesome.

                Unless it's an extreme condition, I really don't think you really NEED to hydrate during the run.  And I really can't think of many routes that's not practical to leave water bottle.  If it's in the city, chances are there are some water fountain.  If you are worried about a dog or chipmunk coming out and peeing on the bottle if you hide it in the bush, well, that may be a problem.

                 

                I can think of many other things that's a lot more masochistic than not carrying water bottles around your waist.  Perhaps running 3 or 4 hours every weekend to prepare for a marathon may be one of them.  In fact, I would classify carrying water bottles around your waist when you run more than 2 hours being one of them too.  Consider people were running long distances way before anybody "invented" water bottle belt.

                 

                You probably don't "need" to, but if it's a tough run then becoming very thirsty is unpleasant - of course the effort of running can hurt too - but at least there's a point to that. There's no point to becoming very thirsty.

                 

                Depends on what we mean by "practical" - there may be places where you can put stuff, but I don't regard driving or cycling ten miles to hide a water bottle in preparation for a run as "practical" - I'd rather carry something. Of course it's preferable not to have to carry something - but it's an acceptable compromise.

                 

                Sure - people used to manage without - but there are lots of things that people used to manage without; it doesn't mean that innovations are necessarily a bad thing.

                 

                Of course there was a time when people were actually prohibited from drinking (early) during marathons...

                  Unless it's an extreme condition, I really don't think you really NEED to hydrate during the run.  And I really can't think of many routes that's not practical to leave water bottle.  If it's in the city, chances are there are some water fountain.  If you are worried about a dog or chipmunk coming out and peeing on the bottle if you hide it in the bush, well, that may be a problem.

                   

                  I can think of many other things that's a lot more masochistic than not carrying water bottles around your waist.  Perhaps running 3 or 4 hours every weekend to prepare for a marathon may be one of them.  In fact, I would classify carrying water bottles around your waist when you run more than 2 hours being one of them too.  Consider people were running long distances way before anybody "invented" water bottle belt.

                   

                  Nobby, You need some more trail running experience, esp. in Alaska. Wink  How fast does water freeze at -30F? Do you really have water fountains running in MN in winter?

                   

                  You just need to find a belt that works for you - or better yet a pack, so you can run for hours. Wink  I know what you're saying, but you're coming from a perspective where 2 hrs or so is a long run.

                   

                  Didn't they used to use botas or something like that in ancient times? I think native americans in the desert southwest may have used something to carry water when travelling from one village to another. (the details escape me at the moment but John Annerino wrote a book on his mimicking an ancient trade route in the Grand Canyon, called "Running Wild") I'll admit I've always wondered what Phidippedes used or whether he grabbed stuff from vineyards - carbs and fluids - as he went by - or whether there were enough springs along the way.

                  "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog

                    I completely appreciate the fact that running without hydration if done properly, would lead to a positive adaptation to doing well in the marathon as your body learns to store more water in the long run (literally and metaphorically). I have run for 2 hours without hydration in cooler climates (and 2 hours is a long run for me) and i have been completely gutted in hot humid climates for just about 70 minutes. If i could help it, i wouldnt be carrying an hydration belt.

                     

                    Given that i only do it when i absolutely need to, i really would love to get any fixes to my original predicament.

                    I dont sweat. I ooze liquid awesome.


                    Best Present Ever

                      I often runs on country roads early in the morning, where there are neither convenience stores nor water fountains and I'm not really interested in adding an extra 30 minutes to my 5:30 departure so I can drive down the road and leave water.  I often carry water.  I've tried a number of belts & the one with the least bounce for me is the go-lite belt: http://www.golite.com/HydroSprint--P742.aspx

                       

                      The compression straps mean you can tighten it down and keep the bottle from moving around.  You can also shove your shirt under the straps when the run in pre dawn cold and ends in full sun. 


                      Interval Junkie --Nobby

                        I have the Nathan 2 bottle version.  I don't have experience with other belts, but I don't really care for using this one.  When the bottles are full the belt turns so the bottles orbit my waist.  When the bottles are 3/4 the belt stabilizes -- somewhat.

                         

                        I get the most stability when I wet the belt, and/or my shirt to cause enough friction that the belt doesn't move around.  That makes it tolerable.  But I still don't like running with it if I don't have to.  I recently tried a hand-held bottle.  Originally I rejected the idea because of possible form alterations.  But it didn't seem to be a problem on an 18miler.  I might go that route in the future.

                         

                        Does anyone have recommendations on a camelback-type bladder?

                        2014 Goals:  sub-3 Marathon 

                        Current Status 06/19: Pelvic stress-fracture = 6-weeks of no running.


                        Awesome

                          Why not a handheld bottle (http://bit.ly/wTrXyY)? They take some getting used to, but work well. In the summer, I'd just stop at a store and pack it with ice (or refill it at a water fountains). 

                           

                          These days, when I run in cities I just carry cash so that I can stop somewhere if I need anything. My sister's dog chewed up my handheld bottle pretty well, and I decided that I couldn't justify the expense of replacing it.

                           

                          I used a fuel belt for a little while, but I had the same problem you did, and some nasty chafing to boot.


                          Bacon Party!

                            I often runs on country roads early in the morning, where there are neither convenience stores nor water fountains and I'm not really interested in adding an extra 30 minutes to my 5:30 departure so I can drive down the road and leave water.  I often carry water.  I've tried a number of belts & the one with the least bounce for me is the go-lite belt: http://www.golite.com/HydroSprint--P742.aspx

                             

                            The compression straps mean you can tighten it down and keep the bottle from moving around.  You can also shove your shirt under the straps when the run in pre dawn cold and ends in full sun. 

                             

                            I second the recommendation for the GoLite HydroSprint and HydroSpeed (2 full-sized bottles).

                            They have been the only packs I've been able to make work for me - comfortable (no bouncing, no chafing, no bruising) for at least 25 hours!

                             

                            That said, I typically don't carry water for runs under 2 hours. And, often use a hand-held for shortish runs if I think I might "like" some water during the course of my run.

                            Liz

                            pace sera, sera

                              I got a Fuel Belt 4-bottle two years ago and had the exact same problem.  Never could get it to stay on my hips.  I ended up getting their two-bottle adjustable belt; wore that at my waist and it stayed in place.  Of course, you lose half your fluid volume that way.

                               

                              Try positioning the belt so two of the bottles rest on your backside -- it seemed to reduce "bottle-bounce" and help the belt stay in place slightly longer compared to having them out nearer the hip crests.

                              “Everything you need is already inside.” -- Bill Bowerman

                                Why not a handheld bottle (http://bit.ly/wTrXyY)? They take some getting used to, but work well. In the summer, I'd just stop at a store and pack it with ice (or refill it at a water fountains). 

                                 

                                These days, when I run in cities I just carry cash so that I can stop somewhere if I need anything. My sister's dog chewed up my handheld bottle pretty well, and I decided that I couldn't justify the expense of replacing it.

                                 

                                I used a fuel belt for a little while, but I had the same problem you did, and some nasty chafing to boot.

                                When we were working on our Running Wizard program, Eric sort of pushed me by keep telling me; "If you were coaching that person, what would you do?"  And that approach is very much legit.  On that basis, I'd have to say, I was going to end here but with this comment, I'd have to butt in once more time (sorry, OP, this is not quite about the original post either...yet one more time).

                                 

                                Relaxation is one of the most important things in good running.  One of the worst things you can do for that is to hold something in your hand(s) when you run.  When you clinch your fists, you tense up your arm.  You clinch your fist and your shoulders get tensed up; you tense up hour shoulders and you start to sway.  You will not only waste a lot of energy but also screw up good running form.  In that respect, holding a water bottle while running is probably one of the worst things you can do for your comfortable and effective running. 

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