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Does Tragedy Affect Your Running? (Read 738 times)

    Yesterday I  completed my run before I heard about the unfolding tragedy in Newtown, CT.   This morning I was more concerned about the rain and ice outside than whether my running would detract in some way from the tragedy.   I remember that I did not run on 9/11 but chose to run the next day; it was my way to stay sane and to not let the terrorist "destroy" my life.  I know others who refuse to race for months afterwards.

     

    Perhaps it is my distance from the tragedy that gives me such permission.  If I were a direct part of the community, perhaps my running would be curtailed.  I don't know.    But I know I run for spiritual and emotional reasons and that running helps me cope with the dark side of the human soul.

     

    How does tragedy affect your running, if at all?

    tessasnewlife


      Tragedy fuels my runs- but more personal tragedy. Husband dies at 27 pick up running- uncle dies- run- mom diagnosed with cancer- run- brother in law dies- run-  friend dies- run mom dies run... Its how i handle things. Gives me time to think and put energy into something else instead of sitting around crying. At least its has been for the last 26 months.

        tessasnewlife,  I am sorry to hear so much personal loss in your life.   I know that running is a good therapy for depression and that grief is a form of depression.  Peace be with you.

        markrice


        Geezer trying for speed

          Interesting question Perseverance

          Tessasnewlife - hat's-off to your strength and positive actions through such tragedy. My heart goes out to you.

           

          To me, running is clearly a way to refocus... it is not to forget... but it is a sorting... a re-calibration of my reaction to a tragedy. I was heart broken on my drive home as I heard yesterday's news. I ran that evening, not as much to forget as to focus on some positives while wishing I could help the struck families in some way... knowing there's nothing to do but realize the irreplaceable value of each family, including my own.  I will run today and do the same. During last night's run I did some solo crying (easier when no one knows)... because of the families that lost so much. I'll think of what I have.. and return with even more appreciation for what I have. I will take my girl to the park today and appreciate that I can, and be even more patient than before. Then I may run again to help refocus again. 

          Anyone could see races, etc. on www.markrice.com/running.

          I believe in HR training: www.markrice.com/running/heart_rate_training.html

             

             

            How does tragedy affect your running, if at all?

             

               I did my normal run the day of the tragedy.

             

               I will probably be called a little "dark" or cold for saying this, but the only thing that changes when something like this happens is I don't watch the news for the next couple days.  Normally, my favorite channels are CNBC, CNN, most of the time after work on weekdays.  I am one of those rare people that love watching news... Business news, political news, etc. but when a tragedy happens and that story takes 100% of the air time, I watch it for 3 minutes, get just the facts of the incident, then I turn it off.   I see no need to sit there for hours and hear 101 different peoples' opinions or broadcasters or politicians various takes about the events.  

             

                 As sad as these events are, they happen all the time now.  To wrap oneself up in all that coverage can be downright depressing, or even worse, lead to fear and paranoia with some folks.  Don't worry about what you cannot control.  There are nuts in society, hidden, and you cannot control that factor, so not much point in worrying about it too much.  People of all ages have been dying in horrible ways since the beginning of time.  How many kids a day die of starvation, neglect, or other means?  The media sensationalizes the deaths of these 20 kids deaths, but I don't see why it is any more horrific just because it was kids dying in a school, vice kids dying in some other way has happens daily in this country and the world. 

             

                   

            The Plan (big parts)→  /// April:  Hampton, VA 24 Hour Run for Cancer (PR 80 Miles) ///  Nov:  New York Marathon  ///  Dec:  Seashore State Park 50K  ///  ∞

            knbradley2822


              Tragedy (see my avatar) reminded me of how well running helps me cope. It's been months since we lost our friends and we're not out of the woods yet but I'd hate to imagine how hard the last 10 months would have been without running as an outlet.
              markrice


              Geezer trying for speed

                   I did my normal run the day of the tragedy.

                 

                   I will probably be called a little "dark" or cold for saying this, but the only thing that changes when something like this happens is I don't watch the news for the next couple days.  Normally, my favorite channels are CNBC, CNN, most of the time after work on weekdays.  I am one of those rare people that love watching news... Business news, political news, etc. but when a tragedy happens and that story takes 100% of the air time, I watch it for 3 minutes, get just the facts of the incident, then I turn it off.   I see no need to sit there for hours and hear 101 different peoples' opinions or broadcasters or politicians various takes about the events.  

                 

                     As sad as these events are, they happen all the time now.  To wrap oneself up in all that coverage can be downright depressing, or even worse, lead to fear and paranoia with some folks.  Don't worry about what you cannot control.  There are nuts in society, hidden, and you cannot control that factor, so not much point in worrying about it too much.  People of all ages have been dying in horrible ways since the beginning of time.  How many kids a day die of starvation, neglect, or other means?  The media sensationalizes the deaths of these 20 kids deaths, but I don't see why it is any more horrific just because it was kids dying in a school, vice kids dying in some other way has happens daily in this country and the world. 

                 

                       

                 

                Not dark at all in my opinion... wise I'd say. Both your point about diverting attention being very helpful, AND the fact that there are many tragedies that don't hit us with commensurate emotional impact. 

                 

                The only way I challenge you is, I think horrible things like this have always happened and they are not more frequent than they were (now I'll be the lightening rod because so many think they have increased dramatically)... We do HEAR about many more, but they've always happened. I remember a long time ago when I did hear of these, they just didn't plaster them so much. The real sadness includes the ones to which you're referring and the daily killings that don't make much news... the deaths of the Tsunamis, wars, etc. Those lives FAR outweigh many other highly published events.  

                 

                Yet, the emotional hit was so real because of my link with my 6-year-old daughter... our emotions don't always pay attention to logical facts about how many die of lack of seat-belts, a no-helmet-motorcycle-ride, obesity, etc., vs. a school killing... we're human and can't totally avoid the emotional connection with certain incidences. But diverting attention is a huge benefit (when I cannot help in any way, such as in this case). 

                 

                Going out for a daddy-daughter park visit, then second run... nice diversion and focus on the great things I have right here, right now.

                Anyone could see races, etc. on www.markrice.com/running.

                I believe in HR training: www.markrice.com/running/heart_rate_training.html

                     I did my normal run the day of the tragedy.

                   

                     I will probably be called a little "dark" or cold for saying this, but the only thing that changes when something like this happens is I don't watch the news for the next couple days.  Normally, my favorite channels are CNBC, CNN, most of the time after work on weekdays.  I am one of those rare people that love watching news... Business news, political news, etc. but when a tragedy happens and that story takes 100% of the air time, I watch it for 3 minutes, get just the facts of the incident, then I turn it off.   I see no need to sit there for hours and hear 101 different peoples' opinions or broadcasters or politicians various takes about the events.  

                   

                       As sad as these events are, they happen all the time now.  To wrap oneself up in all that coverage can be downright depressing, or even worse, lead to fear and paranoia with some folks.  Don't worry about what you cannot control.  There are nuts in society, hidden, and you cannot control that factor, so not much point in worrying about it too much.  People of all ages have been dying in horrible ways since the beginning of time.  How many kids a day die of starvation, neglect, or other means?  The media sensationalizes the deaths of these 20 kids deaths, but I don't see why it is any more horrific just because it was kids dying in a school, vice kids dying in some other way has happens daily in this country and the world. 

                   

                         

                   

                  Pretty much sums it  up for me. 


                  Bad Ass

                    I feel like KLD.

                     

                    Having said that, I had very tough runs after deaths in my family.  Even when one of my kitties died, I was bawling while running.  But it was at the same time cathartic and I felt much better after that.

                     

                    tessasnewlife, sorry to hear about so much loss.

                    Damaris, Marathon Maniac, Ultra Runner

                    Blog

                    "The most powerful weapon on earth is the human soul on fire."

                      I live in the next town over from Newtown and I ran through a corner of it today on my long run.  It seemed just like it has every other time I've been through it and the sun was shining and the weather was warm.  It was pretty surreal.

                          deaths of these 20 kids deaths, but I don't see why it is any more horrific just because it was kids dying in a school, vice kids dying in some other way has happens daily in this country and the world. 

                         

                               

                         

                        My instinct is to say “FUCK YOU!” – just an emotional response. But I get it. I mean, when the Colorado shooting happened, I guess I kind of felt the same way. Some people I don’t know got killed by some random, and what can you do? People die all the time, in horrific ways, right?

                         

                         But then some sick fuck goes and kills my nephews friends, and I guess it kind of gets a little personal. Kills little five year old kids. Goddamnit.

                        Anyway, nothing I write is gonna change the way you feel, or the way you run, or the way any of you act, because I’m sure you’re all not sick motherfuckers.

                         

                        But have a little compassion for the children who died yesterday, and keep your thoughts about what “happens daily” to your delusional selves.

                        Come all you no-hopers, you jokers and rogues
                        We're on the road to nowhere, let's find out where it goes

                          Running is therapy for me. I've got my own personal tragedies and if it weren't for running I'd probably need a prescription to cope. It also gives me time and space to reflect and work through things. Today I spent some time reflecting on what happened yesterday and how many shortcomings in our society contribute to these outcomes. I have avoided the 24/7 news cycle on this. I know enough already with just a few words. A friend of mine lost a cousin yesterday. There is no distance.

                          jimmyb


                            Depends how personal it is, and how much stress is involved and for what amount of time. This particular shooting was a kick in the gut, where the others that have happened since Columbine haven't been so much so for some reason. It hasn't affected my running, but it has affected me.

                            Log    PRs

                            Julia1971


                              Yesterday I  completed my run before I heard about the unfolding tragedy in Newtown, CT.   This morning I was more concerned about the rain and ice outside than whether my running would detract in some way from the tragedy.   I remember that I did not run on 9/11 but chose to run the next day; it was my way to stay sane and to not let the terrorist "destroy" my life.  I know others who refuse to race for months afterwards.

                               

                               

                              I wasn't much of a runner during 9/11 but I do recall a lot of people feeling like doing anything felt like an indulgence when such a horrible thing had just happened.  And, it took weeks or months for people to feel any sense of normalcy again.  These days, I run by the memorial at the Pentagon on a pretty regular basis.  Almost every time I pass by it, I think of them and gather strength and appreciation for the fragility of life.  Sometimes, I think about how many of them may have been runners and how I owe it to them to make the most of my run that day.

                               

                              Perhaps it is my distance from the tragedy that gives me such permission.  If I were a direct part of the community, perhaps my running would be curtailed.  I don't know.    But I know I run for spiritual and emotional reasons and that running helps me cope with the dark side of the human soul.

                               

                               

                              I think there's some truth to the distance part.  As one of the runners who was supposed to run NYCM this year, it was hard for me to figure out whether running the race was appropriate or not since I was not part of that community.  (And even members of that community disagreed).

                               

                              How does tragedy affect your running, if at all?

                               

                              I think about tragedy on my runs almost every day since there are several spots on my running routes where very bad things have happended to people.  When I pass those spots, I reflect on things like how the future is not promised, how I need to appreciate what I have and am able to do, how I need to be nicer to people...  If I didn't pass those spots every day, I'm not sure I would think about these things as often.

                              You're too strong not to keep on keepin' on. - The Pips
                              Yes, I am! - Gladys Knight

                                Yea I always go out for a run gives me a chance to be alone and think things thru.

                                Turning back the clock one mile at a time

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