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How do you feel at the end of a 5k? (Read 286 times)

    Pretty much like I am about to die.

     

    I've had the tag taker-offers ask me if I need a minute to walk. Maybe they are afraid I'm going to hork on them...so I must look like I feel.

     

    I keep swearing off 5ks. And then I keep signing up for them.

     

    Tag-taking sounds like a job I'm glad somebody else is doing.

    Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

    bap


      i'm usually on hands and knees, struggling for breath, feeling like I'm going to heave. I've even put my fingers down my throat hoping that throwing up will make me feel better.

       

      The notable exception was when I ran a big PR, when I felt so good that I  only had rested for 2 minutes before starting my warm down run.

      Age 52

      2016 Targets - 100 - 13.2s, 400 - 62s, 800 - 2:30, Mile - 5:40

      Hipfan


      Proud Calgarian

        If I've done it right (all out), then I feel totally exhausted like the finish line can't come quick enough. On the bright side, one thing I like about 5k's as opposed to longer races is that give 10-20 minutes and I've recovered enough to not be a gasping pile of mess any more. One can do a 5k race in the morning and then get on with their day, something that can't be done with as much success with a marathon.

        2014 Goals and PRs:

        5k - 17:59 (18:17);  10k - 37:00 (37:54);   HM - 1:21:59 (1:24:21);   FM - whatever (3:05:46)

        bap


          If I've done it right (all out), then I feel totally exhausted like the finish line can't come quick enough. On the bright side, one thing I like about 5k's as opposed to longer races is that give 10-20 minutes and I've recovered enough to not be a gasping pile of mess any more. One can do a 5k race in the morning and then get on with their day, something that can't be done with as much success with a marathon.

           

          It also means you can run them every weekend, so if you feel bad about messing one up you can redeem yourself within a week. Try that with the marathon.

          Age 52

          2016 Targets - 100 - 13.2s, 400 - 62s, 800 - 2:30, Mile - 5:40


          Boston Strong in 2014!

             

            You are doing it right.

            +1 I usually feel like I'm going to puke, but there's nothing in my stomach so I just cough and heave and look like I'm going to pass out for a minute or so. Then I know I've come close to giving it my all.

             

            Of course, I feel like this when I've finished a half marathon, too. It's something about all the blood rushing to your stomach when you slow down after pushing hard. The best thing to do is keep moving (walking) to keep the blood flowing to your limbs as well.

            2014 goals

            2000 miles; 5k < 24:30; HM < 1:56Century Bike Ride

             

            Upcoming:

            NYC Half Marathon 3/16Boston Marathon 4/21


            Feeling the growl again

              If I am not in great shape, it's just a terribly uncomfortable feeling.  If I am in shape with a high lactate tolerance and can utterly destroy myself, it's focused panic and adrenaline covering a rabid gopher gnawing my insides out.

              "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

               


              Gang Name "Pound Cake"

                If I am not in great shape, it's just a terribly uncomfortable feeling.  If I am in shape with a high lactate tolerance and can utterly destroy myself, it's focused panic and adrenaline covering a rabid gopher gnawing my insides out.

                +1

                Not that I've yet to be in that kind of shape, but I love the description. Yes, panic and pain and gopher gnawing is an accurate picture.

                - Scott

                2014 Goals: First Marathon - BQ2016 <3:40 - 1/2M <1:45 - 5K <22:00

                2014 Marathons: 05/04 Flying Pig (3:49:02) - 09/20 Air Force - 11/01 Indianapolis Monumental


                The Irreverent Reverand

                  You're doing it right. If you don't feel like death afterwards, you didn't run hard enough.

                  Husband. Father of three. Lutheran pastor. National Guardsman. Runner. Political junkie. Baseball fan.

                   

                  Goals for 2014:

                  Sub-3:30 marathon; run for a year free from major injuries or interruptions

                  PRs: 3:27 marathon; 1:41 half; 45:07 10K; 23:26 5K; 6:02 mile; <12 parsecs Kessel Run

                  NHLA


                    Coach ask are you going to trow up today.

                    Its funny but when he ask that I don't trow up.

                    The end of a 5k does not bother me as much as the pain that starts at 1 1/2 miles.

                      Last year I ran three 5K races; oddly enough, the third was A) my slowest by a considerable margin, B) had by far the fastest final 1.1 miles, and C) I actually felt pretty good when I crossed the line.  Those of you reading this will no doubt say I didn't go out fast enough following the start, and yes, that's true, but there are extenuating circumstances.

                       

                      About 20 hours before the start of my "slow" 5K I had finished my sixth and final leg of the Reach the Beach - NH relay (I ran with a 6-person "Mixed Ultra" team and my six legs covered 32.8 miles), so I was understandably stiff and sore when the gun went off.  Speaking of the gun; I lined up back with the stroller crowd, and when said gun went off, I started "running", even still, I was being passed by "walkers" by the hundreds.  Per the official results, it took me some 35 seconds to make it to the starting line (maybe 25 meters), and it wasn't because I was dodging slow folks, I was the slow folk in that group.  My first 1/2 mile took about seven minutes, my second 1/2 took another five, and my 2nd mile took right bang on eight minutes.  By the time I was into my third mile I was feeling reasonably loose and my legs weren't in too much pain so I started ramping up the speed; my final 1.1 miles went by in 6:47, and while I was breathing hard at the finish, I felt like I'd done a hard workout and not an all out race.

                       

                      Did I mention there was a free beer waiting at the finish?  That beer (a nice hoppy IPA) found its way into my hand only a couple of minutes after the finish.  Smile

                      jimmyb


                        Huggable in the mental sense, not-huggable in the physical, always huggable on a soul level.

                        But there is never anyone to hug at the end of a 5k. It's just not a hugging occasion.

                        Log    PRs

                        C-R


                          Heh  Only thing I want to hug is a garbage can if I race it properly.

                           

                          Huggable in the mental sense, not-huggable in the physical, always huggable on a soul level.

                          But there is never anyone to hug at the end of a 5k. It's just not a hugging occasion.


                          "He conquers who endures" - Persius
                          "Every workout should have a purpose. Every purpose should link back to achieving a training objective." - Spaniel

                          http://ncstake.blogspot.com/

                            A few years down the home stretch of a 10k I dry heaved for the last 100-200 yards or so all the way to the finish line without stopping or slowing.   After the race my wife's boss said, "at least you didn't puke at the finish line, like 3 other people did before you."   I just laughed and was happy he didn't notice me almost hurling all the way to the line.  Smile

                             

                            So, yes, what your feeling is pretty normal. Smile

                            jimmyb


                              Heh  Only thing I want to hug is a garbage can if I race it properly.

                               

                               

                              Interesting fetish. Do you prefer tin, steel or plastic?

                              I hear steel is the most sensual, while plastic is more versatile.

                              Log    PRs

                              C-R


                                 

                                Interesting fetish. Do you prefer tin, steel or plastic?

                                I hear steel is the most sensual, while plastic is more versatile.

                                 

                                Plastic but mostly for that vinyl baked in the sun garden hose smell.

                                 

                                Brings back good memories


                                "He conquers who endures" - Persius
                                "Every workout should have a purpose. Every purpose should link back to achieving a training objective." - Spaniel

                                http://ncstake.blogspot.com/

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