Sugar and Processed Foods (Read 387 times)


SheCan

     

    I don't mean to be crude, but how do you deal with the breezy after-effects of such a diet?

     

    LOL@ Tom's answer!  Do that until your body gets used to the diet, and it will.  The living body is quite adaptive.  But you'll still pooh a lot.

    Cherie

    "We do not become the people who this world needs simply by turning our backs on anyone we don’t like, trust, or deem healthy enough to be in our presence. "  ---- Shasta Nelson


    sugnim

       

      LOL@ Tom's answer!  Do that until your body gets used to the diet, and it will.  The living body is quite adaptive.  But you'll still pooh a lot.

       

      I dunno about that.  I was vegetarian for 12 years and never got used to that.  Many of my meals today are plant-based, but there's just no getting around the afterwind!

      gpb


        I dunno about that.  I was vegetarian for 12 years and never got used to that.  Many of my meals today are plant-based, but there's just no getting around the afterwind!

         

        I guess it depends on your particular blend of intestinal flora and fauna.  My diet is mostly plant based and nobody rolls down the car windows when I get in.


        Needs more cowbell!

           

          Homemade bread and salty snacks are my downfall. Sugary things do not tempt me.

           

          I could take or leave most sweets...but chips, crackers, bread...bad.  A sleeve of Ritz crackers is a serving, right?

          I shoot pretty things! ~

          '14 Goals:

          • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

          • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

             

            I could take or leave most sweets...but chips, crackers, bread...bad.  A sleeve of Ritz crackers is a serving, right?

             

            I'm pretty sure it is.

            scappodaqui


            rather be sprinting

              The diet you describe has literally nothing in common with the fad diet known as "Paleo," which is actually probably for the best.  Cheese, potatoes, bread, milk, processed mayo, oatmeal, and sugar are streng verboten on that plan.  Your diet isn't even particularly low in sugar.  But if it works, great!

               

              Personally, I count macros and avoid artificial sweeteners and added sugar almost entirely (I do eat some foods made with lo han guo--a natural sweetener--or stevia, but that's rare; I have 10g of dark chocolate now and again).  I take coffee black or with plain almond milk. I eat almost exclusively whole grains, except maybe after a long workout when my stomach won't accept much but something very plain like a white bagel, and I need lots of carbs.  Mostly, though, I go for the meat/eggs or egg whites/beans/whole grains or fermented grains (not totally strict about that, I just don't eat bread with added HFCS or anything)/tons of vegetables/moderate fruit/full-fat dairy/potatoes/sweet potatoes/starchy vegetables like peas and so forth for more carbs.

               

              For me the hardest part is not getting too much protein, since I love meat and fish and find it very satisfying.  I just keep portions small, like no more than 3 oz per meal.  I do NOT eat 'Paleo,' as I eat beans and dairy, but I barely consume any processed foods.

               

              It's been a double-edged sword, eating this way.  I tend to get way too much fiber and it's hard to get enough carbs, but I don't get low blood sugar or cravings, which I like, and because I work long hours I like not feeling constantly compelled to snack on sugary stuff.  But I also struggle with having chronically low blood pressure due to inadequate sodium (+ genetic extreme hypotension) and have to add extra salt to everything.  In some ways, a more "processed" diet would be better for me.  But it's much easier to get to race weight eating a lot of vegetables to fill up.

               

              For losing weight, I've adopted a paleo-ish diet.  I made that word up on my own, so I can say the diet is my own.  Started with quitting all soda in June 2013, and progressed from there in stages to make it a better diet.  Here is the basic diet, and I've mostly been staying with it, although holidays are always a challenge.

               

              Water to drink anytime

              -- Breakfast is a glass of 1% milk, 2 eggs, and half-glass of grape juice (100% but store bought, sorry).

              -- Early snack is a banana.

              -- Lunch is turkey on a potato roll, with some mayo, 1 slice of cheese, and a lot of fresh spinach crammed into the sandwich, plus half an orange on the side (other half is in my son's lunch).

              -- After lunch snack is 4 homemade oatmeal raisen nut cookies, very little sugar added in baking.

              -- Supper is typically broccoli and (chicken or ground sausage or steak) and a sauce.  Could be cauliflower or cabbage with the meat, but definitely no pasta, no rice, no potato.  The sauce can be Italian, Chinese, Indian, whatever, either homemade or from a jar if need be.

              -- Dessert is 1 yogurt cup

              -- Late snack is an apple and or an orange.

               

              Cheats are typically dates (especially if too much tv on a lazy weekend), but try not to eat too many, as they have a lot of natural sugar.

               

              I've lost 46 pounds thus far, so it must be working.  I don't really want junk food anymore.  Not much need for it.  But don't take away my yogurt!

              PRs: 5k 19:25, mile 5:38, HM 1:30:56

              Lifting PRs: back squat 176 lb


              Slow and Steady

                I don't mean to be crude, but how do you deal with the breezy after-effects of such a diet?

                 

                I'm a guy. We like it when you mean to be crude.

                 

                But to answer your question:

                a) I am never unable to hold it in until a more appropriate time and place to let 'er rip.

                b) I think the body adapts to this diet so that the gas is not so great after a while.

                c) There are ways to prepare beans to lessen the flatulence.

                Eric S.

                Trail Mix ||| dailymile ||| RA log

                Goals: 50km, 50-miler, 100km, 100-miler


                sugnim

                   

                  I'm a guy. We like it when you mean to be crude.

                   

                  But to answer your question:

                  a) I am never unable to hold it in until a more appropriate time and place to let 'er rip.

                  b) I think the body adapts to this diet so that the gas is not so great after a while.

                  c) There are ways to prepare beans to lessen the flatulence.

                   

                  a) I envy that skill.

                  b) My body must be at the bottom of the learning curve.

                  c)  Please share your bean preparation methods!  I've tried baking powder, and various soaking methods to no avail.


                  Slow and Steady

                    c)  Please share your bean preparation methods!  I've tried baking powder, and various soaking methods to no avail.

                     

                    One thing we do is to use completely fresh water when you cook the beans. In other words, don't cook the beans in the water you used to soak them or rinse them.

                     

                    Of course, this is assuming you're using beans from a bag. If you're using canned beans....I got nothin'. Big grin

                    Eric S.

                    Trail Mix ||| dailymile ||| RA log

                    Goals: 50km, 50-miler, 100km, 100-miler


                    A Dance with Monkeys

                      Just cook your beans in a crock pot. Dur.

                        We soak our beans overnight in plenty of RO-filtered water, then rinse well and cook slowly in a generous amount of filtered water.  Seems to work well.  Also, I agree that it takes some time for one's gut flora to adapt to new stuff in the diet.

                        Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.


                        A Dance with Monkeys

                          I throw them in the crockpot. I add water. I go to work. 10 hours later I have delicious beans and no gas.

                           

                          no soaking, no changing the water, no hassle.

                          gpb


                            a) I am never unable to hold it in until a more appropriate time and place to let 'er rip.

                             

                            This is why men own dogs.

                            SillyC


                              I throw them in the crockpot. I add water. I go to work. 10 hours later I have delicious beans and no gas.

                               

                              no soaking, no changing the water, no hassle.

                               

                              Crockpot cooking beans can make you severely ill.  There's a poison in them called phytohaemagglutinen that isn't fully inactivated in the crockpot.Don't do this with kidney beans or you will be puking and might need to be hospitalized.

                               

                              http://www.fda.gov/food/foodborneillnesscontaminants/causesofillnessbadbugbook/ucm071092.htm


                              A Dance with Monkeys

                                Uh, no.

                                 

                                And by the way, this RARE illness is caused by ANY method of cooking when the beans are undercooked. Not just crockpot. Per my comments, crockpots are more likely fully and correctly to cook dried beans (which is why gas is reduced) than other methods.