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newton running shoes (Read 1651 times)

    Does anyone have these? Other than the price, I'm very interested in checking them out. I currently use nike air structure triax+ 10 (with orthotics), but would like to get a 2nd pair of shoes and am looking for ideas.

    Race Plans

    New Year's Race Los Angeles, January 3, 2015

      I bought these a couple of weeks ago and I have to say, they live up to the hype! The actuator lug effect is hard to notice on the pavement. But when I tried them on the treadmill, I really noticed it. I had to make a huge effort to slow down. Also, I tend to be a heel striker when I get tired and/or lazy, so these really work for me. And on final bonus: I got them in hot pink! Oh yeah baby...
      Ed4


      Barefoot and happy

        I've heard good things, but the price turns me off. If you're really concerned with improving your form, you can spend some time running barefoot, which is free. Wink
        Curious about running barefoot? Visit the new barefoot running group.
        Scout7


        CPT Curmudgeon

          OK, if I sound ranty, there's a reason I won't go into right now, but anyway... Couple points here. Firstly, from all the numbers I've ever read, around 80% of the running population are heel strikers. What does this mean? Two things: A) The shoe companies design shoes to fit the largest audience; B) There is absolutely nothing biomechanically wrong with heel striking. In fact, regardless of what part of your foot hits first, your heel hits the ground. The issue with heel striking is that it is a symptom, not a cause of, over-striding. Over-striding causes issues with your legs, and is less efficient. However, in and of itself, heel striking is NOT bad; at slower speeds, I'm willing to bet most people land further towards their heels, anyway. It's a natural thing. Any piece of equipment that proclaims to solve all your woes, or make you suddenly faster or more efficient, smacks of snake oil and marketing hype. If your foot strike is an issue, there are free ways to improve it. There are form drills for one. Running uphills and downhills are another.
            I've heard good things, but the price turns me off. If you're really concerned with improving your form, you can spend some time running barefoot, which is free. Wink
            I've seen your previous posts and was pretty amazed with the whole barefoot running thing. I had knee issues when I first started running and found out it was from over-pronating. How do you run barefoot if this is an issue? Is it at all possible?
              I'm intrigued by the barefoot thing, as well. I have to wear orthotics now. Does that mean running barefoot would be a bad idea, or does that mean that I'm someone that could greatly benefit from it? Do I tape the orthotics to my feet? Just kidding. Not about the first questions, though.

              Race Plans

              New Year's Race Los Angeles, January 3, 2015

              Ed4


              Barefoot and happy

                Running barefoot is actually much easier on my knees. I know it sounds counter-intuitive, but it's true. You simply run much more gently when you can get feedback from your feet. It was actually knee pain that led me to barefoot running. I think someone who is dependent on orthotics or very controlling shoes can benefit immensely from barefoot exercise. But you need to start really easy. Start with walking. When I started, I was amazed at the muscles in my feet I never knew I had. And boy did they get sore when I overdid it. But now they're very noticably stronger. I feel like I have much better balance and stability. The best way to get started is to find a surface to walk and/or run on that's hard but smooth. I use a bike path. A soft surface like sand doesn't help nearly as much because it allows you to be sloppy, and can actually exagerate your bad habits. But you want it to be smooth because your soles will be very sensitive at first. I found it very helpful to do some running barefoot, but also some running in Vibram FiveFingers. The FiveFingers protect your soles but still allow you to exercise your feet. Some people will tell you that you're safer just sticking with completely barefoot running, because your soles will prevent you from doing too much too soon, and if you've got bad form habits it will be more noticable. I definitely overdid it at first and had to take some time off to let myself recover. And go read the forums at runningbarefoot.org. There are a bunch of very helpful and interesting people there who have done amazing things. http://runningbarefoot.org http://sports.groups.yahoo.com/group/RunningBarefoot/
                Curious about running barefoot? Visit the new barefoot running group.
                Ed4


                Barefoot and happy

                  Any piece of equipment that proclaims to solve all your woes, or make you suddenly faster or more efficient, smacks of snake oil and marketing hype.
                  I couldn't agree more. But the same criticism can be applied to all running shoes. The idea that we're incapable of running comfortably and quickly without hi-tech assistance is just marketing hype. Becoming a barefoot runner is like taking the Red Pill. Smile
                  Curious about running barefoot? Visit the new barefoot running group.
                    OK, if I sound ranty, there's a reason I won't go into right now, but anyway...
                    Yeah, you do sound ranty, but you make some good points. Personally, I am a single woman with no kids who doesn't buy designer clothes and buys most of her running gear at Target. So I felt I could reasonably afford to plunk down $165 on what did turn out to be the lightest, most comfortable pair of shoes I've ever run in (and the cutest). But it's not something I'm willing to get worked up over. Wink Redrunner, the company does have a 30 day trial period. You can buy the shoes, run in them as much as you like for 30 days, and if you're not happy, they'll refund your money + shipping. I'm happy with mine, but others may feel differently. Good luck with your market research!! Smile Ed4, thanks for the info. Right now I am sidelined with a strained quad, but I may give the barefoot running a go once I'm able to run again. I'll keep you posted.
                      Couple points here. Firstly, from all the numbers I've ever read, around 80% of the running population are heel strikers. What does this mean? Two things: A) The shoe companies design shoes to fit the largest audience; B) There is absolutely nothing biomechanically wrong with heel striking.
                      Actually, that's not true... Take off your shoes and jog across your yard or beach. Within a few steps, you'll be striking on your forefoot, because that's the "natural" thing to do. We only become heel strikers when we're in shoes. I wear orthotics, too, and am thinking about trying some of this minimalist mumbo-jumbo (newton, nike free, vibram) stuff over the winter because it makes sense and orthotics haven't fixed all of my knee pain... That being said, there is a realistic side of this: Minimalist running only works if you can stay off the roads and - personally - I can't do that more than for about 1/3 of my runs. The reality is that running shoes are a new invention that was designed to protect us from another relatively new invention: the roads.

                      Go to http://certainintelligence.blogspot.com for my blog.

                        Does anyone have these? Other than the price, I'm very interested in checking them out. I currently use nike air structure triax+ 10 (with orthotics), but would like to get a 2nd pair of shoes and am looking for ideas.
                        I was really interested in them as well, but haven't plunked down the cash...I'm going to a running store in Tucson that performs a proper gait analysis, which is what I've always wanted to have done...Not sure what kind of shoes they'll suggest...In the past I've been told Brooks Beast and Asics Kayanos (I've ran my Kayanos into the ground now, there's hardly any tread left, HENCE the trip to Tucson)
                        "Every man's life ends the same way. It is only the details of how he lived and how he died that distinguish one man from another." -Ernest Hemingway

                        -When Chuck Norris wants popcorn, he breathes on Nebraska.

                        -Chuck Norris destroyed the periodic table, because he only recognizes the element of surprise.
                          In the past I've been told Brooks Beast and Asics Kayanos (I've ran my Kayanos into the ground now, there's hardly any tread left, HENCE the trip to Tucson)
                          Interesting. I've followed that same path. Wore the beasts for a long time, then tried the Kayanos, now I'm using the nike air structure triax+ 10. I'm happier with these than both the brooks and asics.

                          Race Plans

                          New Year's Race Los Angeles, January 3, 2015

                            Interesting. I've followed that same path. Wore the beasts for a long time, then tried the Kayanos, now I'm using the nike air structure triax+ 10. I'm happier with these than both the brooks and asics.
                            Funny thing about these shoes... Check out http://runningahead.com/forums/topic/70f48360eadd4e6ab7b556325f4b754f in this same "subforum" about my gait analysis...
                            "Every man's life ends the same way. It is only the details of how he lived and how he died that distinguish one man from another." -Ernest Hemingway

                            -When Chuck Norris wants popcorn, he breathes on Nebraska.

                            -Chuck Norris destroyed the periodic table, because he only recognizes the element of surprise.
                            Ed4


                            Barefoot and happy

                              Minimalist running only works if you can stay off the roads and - personally - I can't do that more than for about 1/3 of my runs. The reality is that running shoes are a new invention that was designed to protect us from another relatively new invention: the roads.
                              You'd think so, but most experienced barefoot runners tend to disagree. Natural trails are actually much more challenging than sidewalks. I'm just back from a comfy 11 miler entirely on pavement in FiveFingers. I do all my barefoot running on pavement and sidewalks. I still find it difficult to venture onto trails without protection. Urban surfaces are hard but smooth, which is not a problem with good form. Natural trails are often littered with sharp stones, roots, and sticks. And they can be every bit as hard as pavement.
                              Curious about running barefoot? Visit the new barefoot running group.
                                Ed - That's really interesting... I'm very curious to experiment with this once my marathon's over (Nov. 11).... I think it makes a lot of sense for a lot of reasons. I'll have to read up on it some more. M

                                Go to http://certainintelligence.blogspot.com for my blog.

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