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Whoops! Bigger race than I thought... (Read 1038 times)

    I totally misunderstood a friend's invite to run a half marathon relay. I thought the total distance was to be split between the six runners. Now I have found out that all runners do the 13 miles and they keep the best 5 and add them together!!! I have never run more than a 5 mile race and although I've been training for the Broad Street Run, I'm not quite there yet. The race is in two weeks. Should I back out or just do my best? Is there a way to improve and be close to being ready by then? Any ideas?? I'm kind of new to races outside of the 5k world.

    Michelle

    Marathon Maniac # 3228



      Nothing you do in the last two weeks before a half marathon is really going to help, so don't try to cram in any extra training. The last long run before a half marathon should probably be no later than two weeks to 10 days before the race. You say that your longest race is 5 miles, but what about your training runs? You might want to make your log public so that we can see how you've been training. Thirteen miles is a distance worthy of respect, but if you have comfortably finished a training run of 10 miles or more in the last month, theres a good chance that you could run a decent half. We really need more info about your training, though, before anyone could give a fully informed opinion.
      How To Run a Marathon: Step 1 - start running. There is no Step 2.
        A half marathon is a long way to go if you're not used to the distance. Trying to run that far, particularly in a race when adrenaline starts flowing, can cause an injury before you even realize it. Personally I probably wouldn't do it, but if I did I would not be at all ashamed to walk as much as I needed to.
        Fortitudine Vincimus - "By endurance we conquer,"
          After talking to my friend and others on the relay team I feel much much better. They do this more for the fun aspect and don't put pressure on each other. Two of the girls have 2 hours as their half marathon times so what I'll do is start with them and then drop back when I feel the need to. I think that going into it without the stress of going for record times will make me relax and enjoy the run. I was assured that even if my time is "bad" it will be okay since they will only take the top 5 out of the 6 people on the team anyhow. I just started posting to Running Ahead and I have not gone back in time to add in my runs. Lately I have been running up to 80 minutes, at a 10 minute mile pace. I do one long run a week, the rest of the week I work on my 5k times since that is what I like to run more. I also do speed work outs once a week (and play soccer one night a week). I am very comfortable with the 10 minute mile pace and I think I will do fine as long as I am able to stick with that. I'm not sure if this will help me or not but this Saturday I'm going to attempt a 10 mile race with a friend (at an easy pace) to see how I do under pressure. I think I'll be okay since the 13 mile race is still two weeks away. From then on I'll do easier runs.

          Michelle

          Marathon Maniac # 3228



            I think this 10 mile run you are planning will tell you a lot about what your strategy should be. Without that knowledge at the present time I think going out at 2 hour pace (9:10min/mile) is a big ask for a distance that you have never done before. If you were to ask me - and feel free to totally ignore me as I have not run a race for years - I would say treat the first 10 miles as a training run (ie 10:00min/mile pace). If you feel you have anything left in yourself after that then race the last 3.1 miles (5k) - a distance you have more experience of. If the energy is gone then run the last part at the same pace. This would still give you a very reasonable first HM time of approx 2 hrs 11 mins. Better to finish strong in your first HM than limp home exhausted not having had a good experience. Good luck in the relay. I look forward to you proving me totally wrong. Wink

            2013

            3000 miles

            Sub 19:00 for 5K  05-03-13 Clee Prom 5K - 19:00:66 that was bloody close!

            Sub-40:00 for 10K 17-03-13 Gainsborough 10K - 39:43

            Sub 88:00 for HM

             


            madness baby

              I think this 10 mile run you are planning will tell you a lot about what your strategy should be. Without that knowledge at the present time I think going out at 2 hour pace (9:10min/mile) is a big ask for a distance that you have never done before. If you were to ask me - and feel free to totally ignore me as I have not run a race for years - I would say treat the first 10 miles as a training run (ie 10:00min/mile pace). If you feel you have anything left in yourself after that then race the last 3.1 miles (5k) - a distance you have more experience of. If the energy is gone then run the last part at the same pace. This would still give you a very reasonable first HM time of approx 2 hrs 11 mins.
              This is great advice. I'd second that. I did my first half in Jan having only done two 10-mile runs in training and I did fine, but I started out at my race pace, not faster. Starting out too fast in the beginning is not a strategy likely to get you to the finish line feeling good. But, that said, I think you can absolutely do well. I'd just recommend finding your pace from the beginning then picking it up later. I think walking through the water stations will help, too! Have a great run this weekend. Good luck! Smile
              deb
                Thank you very much. I always appreciate help! I am pretty nervous about it but I have convinced myself that it will be okay to do this one very slow. I don't want to injure myself. My plan is to attempt to keep a 10 minute mile pace and as you've suggested, see what I have left for the last 3.1. But I will be okay with going slower since this is my first long race. I've already warned the others on the team and they are fine with it. I like the idea of walking through the water stations...although my legs may not want to start back up! I'll update after the run on Saturday (see how I called it a run, a race sounds too much like going for a record time). Saturday's casual 10 miles should open my eyes to how I'll do for the 13 miles.

                Michelle

                Marathon Maniac # 3228




                Prophet!

                  Good luck with the training run and the race. Are you planning to use gels ? If you do make sure you try them in your training runs to see if it won't make you sick..they will certainly help if you can tolerate them, it'll give you a good boost and probably help recover faster.
                    I've never used a gel. I guess I can try it on Saturday. I'll ask the girls I'm running with if they are familiar with them. Thanks!

                    Michelle

                    Marathon Maniac # 3228



                      I didn't run the 10 mile race like I was hoping to, my friend is out for the week with shin splints (trained too hard). I did however, come up with a course to run locally and being the first time I ran it I didn't quite remember it right. I thought I stopped at 10 miles, but when I got to map my run it showed only 9.66!! SO CLOSE. Anyhow, I kept an easy pace, I didn't force up hills, and I was extra cautious around ice/snow and bumps. I stopped at my work, which is how I planned the run, at mile 4.5, I got a drink of water and a hard candy and then I headed right back out to finish. I ended running an hour and 34 minutes, putting my per mile time at 9:44. I am a little worried about how I'll feel tomorrow. Any suggestions for preparing me for pain would be very appreciated! My husband ran the first 3.1 miles with me, which was nice. Then I put on my head phones and kept on running. This was the first time I ran outside with music, it was nice. I feel better about the 13 mile race coming up. I think I'll be okay.

                      Michelle

                      Marathon Maniac # 3228



                        I am a little worried about how I'll feel tomorrow. Any suggestions for preparing me for pain would be very appreciated!
                        Some soreness is to be expected anytime you push yourself past your previous limits. The pain is simply your body adapting and going through the physical process of raising your limits. Stated another way ... no pain, no gain. If you find that any soreness or stiffness is really bothering you, try taking an over-the-counter NSAID pain reliever (e.g., Aleve).
                        How To Run a Marathon: Step 1 - start running. There is no Step 2.
                          I plan on only running a light run on Tues and Thurs of this week. To allow my legs to recover from today and to be ready for next Sunday. I still feel great so I'm REALLY hoping I was more ready to run than I had figured. I've been running long distances on the treadmill but I know that it is very different from running outside, plus the longest I've done on the treadmill is 8 miles. My training log only started from when I discovered Running Ahead, but the training schedule I have posted so far is pretty much like what I've been doing all along...slowly increasing the distances. With my longest actual race being 5 miles, I have however put in bigger distances with training. Today I focused hard on being careful and not rushing. After reading over the different topics from Running Ahead I picked up many helpful ideas on how to run longer distances. After running and stretching, I took an Aleve JUST IN CASE. I have a two hour drive ahead of me and I have a feeling I'll be pretty stiff after that! My goal for next Sunday's 13 mile race is to finish...bonus would be to finish in under 2 hours 15 minutes ( Berner - Is that more realistic ?) Smile As for using gels, I think I'll avoid them for now. My nerves alone will mess with my stomach. Oh - about the no pain no gain theory and raising the limit - I'm learning about that - with my push-ups I'm finally at 3 sets of 20 and at number 20 my arms start to shake, as they did when I was only at 10 and then 15. BUT...I pushed on and over time increased and now I'm proud to say I'm at 20. My 15 year old can do 50...I'm not about to try for that!!

                          Michelle

                          Marathon Maniac # 3228



                            My goal for next Sunday's 13 mile race is to finish...bonus would be to finish in under 2 hours 15 minutes ( Berner - Is that more realistic ?)
                            Having a goal to finish is never a bad goal, especially when its your first time at the distance. Don't worry about the clock, because your going to set a Personal Record no matter what -- as long as you finish! My strategy for half-marathons is to think about the race in three sections: 5 miles, 5 miles, and a final 5K: 1. First 5 miles - Concentrate on not going out too fast and getting into a smooth rhythm. Push yourself a little (it is a race, after all) but you shouldn't feel strained in this stretch. If you are worried that you are going too slow, you are probably doing it right. 2. Second 5 miles - Work on keeping the pace even as you start to feel a little fatigue. Think strong and steady, concentrating on your form and your breathing. These miles might be a bit uncomfortable (that's ok) but you should never be in serious doubt about your ability to finish the race. 3. Last 5K (3 miles) - Go by how you feel. If you think there's gas in the tank, try picking up the pace a little bit. Still feeling good in a mile? Try going a little bit faster. Etc., etc. Alternatively, if you feel that you're truly struggling, use this last stretch to slow down and find the pace that you need to get to the finish line. Use walk breaks if needed. In either case, give it your all in the last 1/4 mile, and cross the line with a smile on your face. Big grin
                            How To Run a Marathon: Step 1 - start running. There is no Step 2.


                            Go Pre!

                              I highly recommend doing a 10 & 1 race, you will recover faster and greatly reduce the chance of any stress injuries. 13 miles is a long way after all. (10 & 1 being run 10 minutes, walk 1 minute) This will hardly affect your overall time and trust me (why would n't you Smile ) you will be glad you did the 10 & 1 the next day. Dave
                                I'm still a little sore from Saturday's grand adventure of running almost 10 miles. Nothing major, so I'm happy about that. But I did ice up yesterday morning and last night. I did a light jog on the treadmill, it felt tight but good. Tonight I have a soccer game, I am pretty sure I'll be passing up on some field time, to spare my quads more pain. I have some slight shin discomfort and soccer would add to that for sure. I like the idea of the 10 and 1, I think I'll keep that in mind while I'm running and if I find that I'm having doubts about being able to finish I can give the that theory a try. I would love to be able to follow what Berner suggested and with finishing strong for the last 5k, but I have a feeling that I'll be happy to just maintain one constant speed and to finish! Next on my list is to go back and read about what foods to eat the day before a long race!

                                Michelle

                                Marathon Maniac # 3228



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