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How to increase my time (Read 930 times)

Kizzy


    Been running since January, but how do i increase my time, i seem to be stuck in the 10 min mile zone? also if my legs are not hurting now does that mean im not doing enough - should i still be feeling it the next day?
      i think, you meant to say how to decrease your time. You need to be training at a fast speed to be able to run faster. Add interval training to your regimen. It's best done at a track or anywhere flat. It's recommended that you only do intervals once a week. What I usually do is one lap (400m) of fast, followed by another lap of slow recovery run. Rinse and repeat until you're tired. You'll notice that you'll run faster after about 6 sessions of intervals.
        Sorry sleepykitty, I must disagree. Wink Judging by the amount you're running Kizzy, and being a new runner, I think you'll find the biggest gains by simply steadily increasing your miles week by week. Since you only seem to be running one or two times a week, I would strongly advise against any kind of interval training. At this point for you, it's a matter of building an aerobic base by slowly increasing the number of times you run per week and then the distance of your runs. That is how you get into shape and how your training times come down eventually. Just do it steadily, find space to run a few more times per week, and you'll slowly get whipped into shape and your times will come down. Same answer to your question about your legs- you generally shouldn't be feeling it the next day unless you made an especially hard or long effort, which should be done sparingly. In a nutshell, run more and be patient. Best of luck.
        sheil2009


        21:00

          Sorry sleepykitty, I must disagree. Wink Judging by the amount you're running Kizzy, and being a new runner, I think you'll find the biggest gains by simply steadily increasing your miles week by week. Since you only seem to be running one or two times a week, I would strongly advise against any kind of interval training. At this point for you, it's a matter of building an aerobic base by slowly increasing the number of times you run per week and then the distance of your runs. That is how you get into shape and how your training times come down eventually. Just do it steadily, find space to run a few more times per week, and you'll slowly get whipped into shape and your times will come down. Same answer to your question about your legs- you generally shouldn't be feeling it the next day unless you made an especially hard or long effort, which should be done sparingly. In a nutshell, run more and be patient. Best of luck.
          Based on my personal experience, i think sleepykitty is right. During xc i didn't get anywhere with long and slow, your body will be trained only then to do that: long and slow. I found that 800 repeats at a slightly faster pace than what i was used to slowly upped my fitness, and i was able to do them faster and faster. Also, running faster and shorter distances builds fast-twitch muscle fibers, which I have read is very beneficial to build a speed base in distance running, especially if you are running middle of the road races like 6ks and less
          Kizzy


            Thanks for the input guys, I am hoping to increase my mileage this week and get out 3x a week as i have a 10k coming up in September and i would really like to me getting 9 min mile by then.


            Needs more cowbell!

              Based on my personal experience, i think sleepykitty is right. During xc i didn't get anywhere with long and slow, your body will be trained only then to do that: long and slow. I found that 800 repeats at a slightly faster pace than what i was used to slowly upped my fitness, and i was able to do them faster and faster. Also, running faster and shorter distances builds fast-twitch muscle fibers, which I have read is very beneficial to build a speed base in distance running, especially if you are running middle of the road races like 6ks and less
              I think speedwork can be dangerous to a person who doesn't have a fairly long history of running, though. I personally didn't start doing much with speedwork or hills until I had been running consistently for a solid year. I've gotten faster by simply running more miles and avoided any serious injury (when I started my average mile pace was ~13 minutes and 16 months later I'm ~10). Actually, my recent spate of injuries happened almost as soon as I started adding speedwork, which I don't think is purely coincidental. And I definitely wouldn't do speedwork on less than 20 consistent miles/week. k

              I shoot pretty things! ~

              '14 Goals:

              • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

              • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

              Kizzy


                I used to run sprints 100m and 200m for an athletic club - but in my teens (forty now), so i know i have the ability to sprint finish (if i save enuf energy) but i do seem to just plod it out, no matter wot my mileage, 2, 3 4 or 6 miles all seem to come out at 10min


                Go Green Wave!

                  I see we are at some disagreement here! Who is to say there is ONE correct answer? Kizzy may benefit from intervals, but most people in her case would benefit more if you were to increase your mileage per week to establish a better aerobic base, at that point intervals will pay dividends!


                  Blaine Moore (MM#2867)

                    If you want to start doing intervals (which are definitely the best way to get faster) then I recommend starting out by running fartleks. Run a good warm up, then pick up the pace a little for 30 seconds or a minute, then ease off for a minute or two, repeat a few times, then cool down. If you do want to run interval type workouts, then start slow and do some walking after each one. (answers for the top questions about intervals) That being said, I agree with the others. Being a new runner, I think that increasing your mileage is the way to go. Even just running 3 or 4 times per week for a month or so will help you out as you improve your base. You really want to have some sort of base before you begin doing interval work.

                    Run to Win
                    24 Marathons, 17 Ultras, 16 States (Full List)




                    Needs more cowbell!

                      I used to run sprints 100m and 200m for an athletic club - but in my teens (forty now), so i know i have the ability to sprint finish (if i save enuf energy) but i do seem to just plod it out, no matter wot my mileage, 2, 3 4 or 6 miles all seem to come out at 10min
                      That's me...only I'm in my 30s. But if you gradually increase your mileage, I almost guarantee that you will get faster. I don't think you will see much of an increase until you are doing 15-20 miles/week, though. You've got to train your body for endurance, first. And most of my "easy" runs are at the same pace--whether I am running 4 miles or 10+. The majority of your miles should be easy (the folks who don't do this find themselves on the bench--not a place anyone wants to be), saving your speed for speedwork and races. I cut 10 minutes off of my 10k time from last year. That is with minimal speedwork and only in the last few months. The big difference is that I am now running ~30 miles/week most weeks. A year ago I think I was running 15-20.

                      I shoot pretty things! ~

                      '14 Goals:

                      • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

                      • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

                      Kizzy


                        Thank u all for yr input, im finding it very informative.
                        sheil2009


                        21:00

                          I think speedwork can be dangerous to a person who doesn't have a fairly long history of running, though. I personally didn't start doing much with speedwork or hills until I had been running consistently for a solid year. I've gotten faster by simply running more miles and avoided any serious injury (when I started my average mile pace was ~13 minutes and 16 months later I'm ~10). Actually, my recent spate of injuries happened almost as soon as I started adding speedwork, which I don't think is purely coincidental. And I definitely wouldn't do speedwork on less than 20 consistent miles/week. k
                          Well I did this in my first year of running and didn't have any major problems. The important thing was build up; i had to start slowly, running 800m repeats at just shy of 9:20 pace (for perspective my slow and easy pace was 10min/mile and is now hovering between 9:10 to 9:20min/mile) and built up to 800s at about a 6:30 pace mid season. It all depends on how you approach it I guess Also, I did slow and steady and built up mileage for the whole summer, and i came in, ran one race and cardiovascular-wise i was okay with haulin ass in this particular race, but I busted my hip because my body couldn't take that kind of speed because I had never done it before. So I think its important to add speedwork to prevent death by race
                            Kizzy, be careful who you listen to. There is a big difference between running fast as a teenager (like sleepykitty and Sheil) and as a 40 year old. Take it from someone who has been both. Tongue Build up your mileage first.
                            Kizzy


                              LOL, god u make me feel olllllddd!, im not looking for any olympic time, would just like to start dipping under the 10 more often, but thanks for all you comments, im intending going out tomorrow and trying out the fartlek session on a 7 miler.
                                My speed has increased since my mileage has increased ... even doing none to minimal speedwork.
                                2009: BQ?
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