Children's Healthcare of Atlanta Obesity Ads (Read 1741 times)

    people have lost the ability to forage aparently.  not me.

     

    I just found an apple, some milk, several sandwiches, and a bag of cookies.  They were just sitting there in the company lunchroom!  I bet if I went looking there every day at 11:00-11:30 I could score all kinds of food. 

     

    so, you're THAT guy! 


    A Sweetheart

      you can be obese but healthy (not convinced).

       

       

       

      But, look!  Now you can be obese and "exercise".

      I want to do it because I want to do it.  -Amelia Earhart

       

      Tennessee Beer Mile Queen

        Wrigley made a great point about weight watchers.  My understanding is that it is about moderation and eating healthy, getting emotional support from people struggling with similar issues, and getting exercise along with watching what you eat.  It really addresses all 3 of the major areas the often result in obesity.  Although again...fairly expensive compared to the average American income.

        2014 Goals:

        Not destroy my back while running.

          Now to throw another tangent at into this.  Plus-size magazine comments on body image.

           

          MTA:  Possibly NSFW.

           While I certainly agree with the idea of not promoting anorexic-like figures, there has to be a caution with plus-sized models.  Some of those girls don't look excessively overweight, but I have seen 'models' that do.  I'm a size 6-8, and I get sickened when people talk about that as 'big'!!  (especially young girls).  I also run 30+ minutes most days.  

          'No matter how slow you go, you're still lapping everyone on the couch'

           

          "Running is a big question mark that's there each and every day. It asks you, 'Are you going to be a wimp or are you going to be strong today?'"  - Peter Maher

           

          "Running long and hard is an ideal antidepressant, since it's hard to run and feel sorry for yourself at the same time. Also, there are those hours of clearheadedness that follow a long run."  -Monte Davis


          Feeling the growl again

            people have lost the ability to forage aparently.  not me.

             

            I just found an apple, some milk, several sandwiches, and a bag of cookies.  They were just sitting there in the company lunchroom!  I bet if I went looking there every day at 11:00-11:30 I could score all kinds of food. 

             

            Sounds like grad school to me.  If you paid attention somewhere, sometime around lunch, there is a seminar that ordered pizza....

            "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

             

              Wrigley made a great point about weight watchers.  My understanding is that it is about moderation and eating healthy, getting emotional support from people struggling with similar issues, and getting exercise along with watching what you eat.  It really addresses all 3 of the major areas the often result in obesity.  Although again...fairly expensive compared to the average American income.

               

              I did WW with my wife once (maybe twice) and I actually liked the points system.  It really taught you what food was good for you and what wasnt.  If i had 3 points to spend, I could eat a pretty large salad with grilled chicken and some no-fat dressing, or I could eat a cookie.  It helped me realize how to spend the points to make myself more full and typically those foods that were less points were better for me too.

               

              The problem with WW like every other diet out there is that people use it to lose the weight then go right back to their crappy eating habits (myself included) and gain the weight back (and usually more)

                Sounds like grad school to me.  If you paid attention somewhere, sometime around lunch, there is a seminar that ordered pizza....

                 

                 

                I thought about this at a seminar once down in Florida.  they had these huge conference centers with dozens of meetings going on - all of which served a free breakfast.  Then at lunch you had 100-200 people filing out of the conference room and into a cafeteria of sorts, or a restaurant where lunch was provided.

                 

                And I thought hey, I could eat at least 2 meals a day here for free.  There are always some people that dont show up for these conferences - so go a bit late and grab one of the available badges.  Eat, leave and come back for lunch.  Though I'm not sure what I would do for dinner.

                  That reminds me, of a small meeting we had, catered with nice food around dinner time.  We were about to leave when the cleaning staff came in.  I thought they were going to throw the food out and tidy up, but they had tupperware containers with them and loaded up instead.  Brilliant!

                  "During a marathon, I run about two-thirds of the time. That's plenty." - Margaret Davis, 85 Ed Whitlock regarding his 2:54:48 marathon at age 73, "That was a good day. It was never a struggle."

                    And I thought hey, I could eat at least 2 meals a day here for free.  There are always some people that dont show up for these conferences - so go a bit late and grab one of the available badges.  Eat, leave and come back for lunch.  Though I'm not sure what I would do for dinner.

                    Tuck a couple Ziploc bags in your sportcoat pockets before you leave for lunch.

                    “Everything you need is already inside.” -- Bill Bowerman


                    Intentionally Blank

                      I haven't read the whole thread, but here are some solutions that we've done or are working on in my city:

                       

                      Mobile market: a mobile fresh produce and healthy food truck that drives into urban desserts to sell groceries.  Accepts food stamps.

                       

                      Providing incentives for corner stores/convenience stores to have fresh fruits and veggies available.

                       

                      Community gardens - using urban space for growing food

                       

                      School gardens to teach children about fresh food.  Right now much of it is not used in the cafeteria, but it should.

                       

                      Linking food stamps users with local farmers markets.  Perhaps even using incentives such as offering extra food stamp money on farmers market food.

                       

                      Encouraging backyard hens in urban areas.

                       

                      Improving school food: linking with local farmers for food rather than buying it from a large distributor such as sysco.  Eliminating flavored milks in the cafeteria.  Eliminating unhealthy ala carte foods.  Demanding more "scratch" cooking rather than simply heating processed meals.  Place limits on foods/treats in classroom celebrations.  Providing fruits and vegeatbles in the cafeteria that are actually palatable and easy to eat (i.e. kindergartners can't peel an orange or successfully eat a firm apple even if you put one on their tray).  Discouraging fundraisers that involve sale of candy/cookies/treats.

                       

                      In my kid's public school, she gets 2 PE classes a week, and 15 minutes of recess once a day.  15 minutes, as a second grader.


                      Intentionally Blank

                        You bring up the excellent point that many poor children get 2 meals a day at the school, on school days.  Often, it's the only two meals they get.  And school food is atrocious.  The USDA guidelines for school food were created in the 1970s when the main concern was getting calories into children, not healthy food.

                         

                        If one of us lived had two of our three meals as school food every day, we would be unhealthy.

                         

                        As to your other point, you make a good point that we need education/incentives/whatever to increase demand for healthy food.  I'm not entirely certain how an inner city poor person effectively demands a grocery store.  Community activism could certainly help with that.

                         

                         

                        For people that at or below the poverty line, when school is in session they are providing students two meals a day.

                         

                        Also, concerning the lack of grocery stores in some urban neighborhoods, it is not a matter of residents demanding a place to buy fresh fruit and vegetables, but the grocery chains won't build a store there.  If there was money to be made they would build a store.  There is not a demand for healthy food in these neighborhoods.  These grocery chains aren't stupid.  They aren't going to build a store just to have their food rot.  Sure, you occasionally hear from people saying they would like to buy fresh, healthy food, but they are in the minority.  Why are these neighborhoods filled with crap fast food restaurants?  Because that's what the people demand.  

                          This reminds me of how my mother found out she was poor... she spent a Saturday as a 14 year old in 1957 at her church helping to put together food baskets for the poor.  The next day she and her widowed mother recieved a food basket. 

                          In an infinite universe, the one thing sentient life cannot afford to have is a sense of proportion

                          http://htwins.net/scale2/scale2.swf?bordercolor=white&fb_source=message

                           

                           

                           

                          gpb


                            You bring up the excellent point that many poor children get 2 meals a day at the school, on school days.  Often, it's the only two meals they get.

                             

                            Worth a read: http://www.heritage.org/research/reports/2011/09/understanding-poverty-in-the-united-states-surprising-facts-about-americas-poor

                             

                            "The U.S. Department of Agriculture collects data on these topics in its household food security survey. For 2009, the survey showed:

                            • 96 percent of poor parents stated that their children were never hungry at any time during the year because they could not afford food."

                             

                            Is it true that there are some poor children who only get the two school meals on some days and go to bed hungry?  Probably.  Is it "many" and is it chronic?  Depends I guess on what you mean by "many".

                            heather85


                              Worth a read: http://www.heritage.org/research/reports/2011/09/understanding-poverty-in-the-united-states-surprising-facts-about-americas-poor

                               

                              "The U.S. Department of Agriculture collects data on these topics in its household food security survey. For 2009, the survey showed:

                              • 96 percent of poor parents stated that their children were never hungry at any time during the year because they could not afford food."

                               

                              Is it true that there are some poor children who only get the two school meals on some days and go to bed hungry?  Probably.  Is it "many" and is it chronic?  Depends I guess on what you mean by "many".

                               

                              Well, sure, who is hungry when there is grocery store give away stale cakes, and crackers and ketchup, or cold cans (hard to heat up things with shut off electricity)  And occasionally, that's practically never.

                               

                              -former poor kid -

                               

                              Just saying what parents respond to that question is subject to a strong bias. Who wants to admit, anonymous or not, letting their child be hungry. Really.  That is a touchy survey.


                              Intentionally Blank

                                Worth a read: http://www.heritage.org/research/reports/2011/09/understanding-poverty-in-the-united-states-surprising-facts-about-americas-poor

                                 

                                "The U.S. Department of Agriculture collects data on these topics in its household food security survey. For 2009, the survey showed:

                                • 96 percent of poor parents stated that their children were never hungry at any time during the year because they could not afford food."

                                 

                                Is it true that there are some poor children who only get the two school meals on some days and go to bed hungry?  Probably.  Is it "many" and is it chronic?  Depends I guess on what you mean by "many".

                                 

                                I suspect my comment and your interpretation of the above statistic are both a bit overstated.  The poor children may not be hungry in large part because they get 2 free meals at school.  I don't think there are many children--in the US-- who go to bed hungry, but I do think there are many children and families who deal with food insecurity.