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Strides (Read 1004 times)

    I have heard a lot about training with something called "strides"... is that just walking fast to increase your stride legnth, or am I way if... and also, what good do they do to your running time?


    I've got a fever...

      I have heard a lot about training with something called "strides"... is that just walking fast to increase your stride legnth, or am I way if... and also, what good do they do to your running time?
      Mikeymike is the Stride-Master, so I'm sure he'll have something to say here. It refers to doing short bursts of speed, say 50m~200m in length, that are done in the course of an easy run, or maybe at the end of an easy run before cooling down. Say for example, you're running an easy 6-miler. After you've gone a good 2~3 miles (to ensure you're warmed-up), you would thrown in anywhere from 6~10 of these short bursts of speed over the course of the rest of the run. They shouldn't be taxing, as they're not meant to be hard speedwork. It's more a neuromuscular thing -- you want your body to get used to running fast and relaxed over short distances. Fast and relaxed is the key. They improve your leg speed, flexibility/coordination and your economy/efficiency. It's hard to quantify how much they'll help you improve, but they're an essential part of a good training program.

      On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.

        Here's a link to one of the Stride-Master's comments. I've started doing 10x100m at the end of a couple of me runs per week. They are fun and change things up. Plus I think they've helped relieve some hamstring tightness I've had in my left leg.

        When it’s all said and done, will you have said more than you’ve done?

          That doesn't sound too bad... I am going to try and run about 2 miles today (its supposed to be an off day, but I didn't run last week) and I'll mix them in for the last mile or so. Just to make it easy for estimating, I'll take it down to about .1 mile per time with 1 minute in between...
            Stride master? Wow, I'm honored! Yep, I'm a big fan of strides but just about everything I would have said has been covered by Jeff and Bonkin. I'll reiterate fast and relaxed is key--you don't want to be straining at all. It's as much a form drill as a speed drill. And make sure to always be really warmed up first and do do full recoveries in between.

            Runners run.

              Pfitzinger (my training guru) would say that strides are all form. The most important thing is keeping good running form while you pick up the pace. Your actual pace isn't important -- keeping good form is the key.
              How To Run a Marathon: Step 1 - start running. There is no Step 2.
                Ok, I understand strides, but how do they differ from intervals and tempo running?
                  My understanding is that intervals and tempo runs are more focused on pace.

                  When it’s all said and done, will you have said more than you’ve done?


                  I've got a fever...

                    Ok, I understand strides, but how do they differ from intervals and tempo running?
                    Tempo training = sustained 20~30 minutes at 15~20 sec/mile slower than your current 10k pace. Intervals = repeats of anywhere from 200m ~ 1 mile at 5k race pace or better example: interval of 6 x 800m @ 15 sec below 5k pace, with 400m recovery jogs (really easy running) in between the intervals. Strides are a form drill. Tempo runs develop stamina and longer race pace endurnace Intervals focus on boosting speed, and are run faster than race pace

                    On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.

                      Ok... I haven't raced in any races, so how do I fnd my 5k and 10k paces?
                        Enter one and race it. Wink Or, map out a 1 mile course, warm-up 10-20min. and run that sucker all-out. Record your time and plug it into McmillanRunning.com and it will provide some pace advice. Buy "Daniel's Running Formula" by Dr. Jack Daniels. Yes

                        Ricky

                        —our ability to perform up to our physiological potential in a race is determined by whether or not we truly psychologically believe that what we are attempting is realistic. Anton Krupicka


                        A Dance with Monkeys

                          Enter one and race it. Wink
                          Agreed. This is the best way.


                          shonan marathon, girl

                            I think we should all do strides regularly. Strides definitely help to remind you about good running form. I find myself doing them at the end of my run. This type of training probably is what helped me to achieve my goal time at my 30k race this past Sunday. I could sprint the last 400-500m to the race finish line. Being able to run relaxed, fast, in good form and without wasting unnecessary energy seems to be the key to a good running time.

                            next race SHONAN MARATHON nov 3rd, 2012, OSAKA MARATHON nov 25th, i am aiming for nyc!

                              Agreed. This is the best way.
                              And the most fun.
                              How To Run a Marathon: Step 1 - start running. There is no Step 2.
                                Per daniels p.167 "Strides are 20-30 seconds of quick, light runs with 1 minute of recovery between each." He advocates these come after any days of Easy intensity with 4-6 at the end of the run. I've been doing 45 seconds with 1 minute recovery jog between with a focus on form. I went a bit longer to simply get a break from the Garmin beeping at me. Big grin My legs in general feel better afterwards and getting to go "fast" makes me happy.
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