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Dogs; what to do? (Read 1448 times)

    The last few weeks I have been attacked by dogs. Today I was attacked by two Pits; mixed breed of some sort. One of them lunged for my face and neck three times, each time I was able to pound him with my fist, when he decided to back off. What do you guys use out there for protection and does it work? I was thinking of pepper spray, along with a folding box knive, should the pepper spray not worK.
    Age is not an illusion
      The last few weeks I have been attacked by dogs. Today I was attacked by two Pits; mixed breed of some sort. One of them lunged for my face and neck three times, each time I was able to pound him with my fist, when he decided to back off.
      I'm glad to hear you're okay. I've dealt with my share of dogs recently - my !$!%ing redneck neighbors all have an aversion to obeying our leash laws - but the dogs haven't been pit bulls. What happened to you is not a joke. A local runner was actually mauled to death a couple years back, somewhere around here. FIRST thing you should be doing is calling the police and animal control. No joke. The authorities NEED to be informed, for a couple reasons. First, they might actually do something about it; second, a visit from the cops might give the dumb mother!@%@!%ers who own the dogs a clue; and three, if nothing else, reporting an attack creates legal notice of the threat - in other words, when a real attack happens, it will be on record that the owners knew perfectly well their dogs were vicious. It shouldn't matter - in most jurisdictions, pit bulls are treated in the same way pet cougars are, and the owners are strictly liable for any damages. But do it anyway. Sorry to go on, but this - along with crappy, dangerous, cell phone using rednecks behind the wheel - is my biggest pet peeve at the moment. And that's just with my local mutts - if it was a pit bull, I'd be visiting the owners personally. Make sure you notify the authorities. Because next time, it won't be an adult able-bodied runner, it'll be someone's pet, or someone's child. You don't want to have to live with the guilt if you don't report it and somebody's child dies. Modified to add: take care of yourself. Find a different route. Pepper spray is not going to help against a pack of pit bulls. A knife might not either. And if you take a knife, I'd rather you use it on the owners. It's not the dogs' fault their owners are wastes of oxygen. If I sound pissed, it's because I am. My fiancee only runs outside once or twice a week, and she's literally terrified of the local mutts. Every single time we run together at least once she's standing behind me shrieking while somebody's dog is charging at us. Please take of yourself. At the very least, do a little research on dog behavior. If you get attacked again, make sure you don't run. Stand your ground. And growl. Seriously. It works. And I'm sure you already know all this, but maybe the next person to read this won't. Running away when a dog attacks can get you killed. Stop. Face. Growl. Then go home and call the cops. And animal control. (And I won't even mention what I really think you should do next.) /sermon off Short version: people suck.
      E-mail: JakeKnight2002@aol.com
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        I agree, you should absolutely call and report the attack. and carry a metal stick. and pepper spray. maybe find a new route? Confused That's some scary stuff. Undecided I run in a very pedestrian friendly area and there are lots of dogs. Fortunately, they are for the most part, leashed...the few people who let them off, seem to consider their dogs friendly. But I'm always careful to steer clear.
        Jennifer mm#1231


        Needs more cowbell!

          Ditto Jake Knight. When he's not being a goofball he really offers some great wisdom and logic. Wink I see quite a few dogs on my run and have never encountered any agressive ones, though I do often avoid a home that has a loose Boxer. Boxers can be aggressive, but this one is not...at all. She is small, sweet, and way too friendly. She wants to follow me and I worry that she will and could end up getting hit by a car. I do carry pepper spray on my longer runs out away from town...both as protection from dogs, but also against humans with less than kind intentions. Fortunately I have yet to need it. *knock on wood*

          I shoot pretty things! ~

          '14 Goals:

          • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

          • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

            Make sure you notify the authorities. Because next time, it won't be an adult able-bodied runner, it'll be someone's pet, or someone's child. You don't want to have to live with the guilt if you don't report it and somebody's child dies. Please take care of yourself. At the very least, do a little research on dog behavior. If you get attacked again, make sure you don't run. Stand your ground. And growl. Seriously. It works. And I'm sure you already know all this, but maybe the next person to read this won't. Short version: people suck.
            What an eye opener, going beyond of what to do about the dogs attacking you, but to also think about the what if's about them attacking a child. Until JK said it, I didn't even think of that. Plus...Running would be my first reaction which would probably get me killed, the whole stand your ground and growl thing is something I'll tuck away in my mind and hopefully remember it if I need to. As much as I love animals I still don't trust them, entirely. The owners in these cases are truly ignorant.

            Michelle



              Yesterday (around 6:00 pm) as my husband and I were running we ran by a house with a dog in the yard, it's a dog we don't see out often, an old shep mix. He was barking immediately and the owner HURRIED to get to him before we got closer and before the dog started running. She had to keep telling him no, all the while he was barking at us as we went by. I was annoyed when I caught her glance at me as if we were bothering them (most likely she was just annoyed with the dog). Then I was really annoyed when my back was to them and I had to keep listening to make sure that dog wasn't at my heels. Knowing her dog is like that she should have him leashed, or behind a fence. If she wasn't outside when we ran by who knows how far the dog would have gone to get to us. The other dogs we deal with are at homes with underground dog fences or real fences. I get a little nervous when this one dog rushes full speed to end of his property but then stops without fail, on a dime, when he gets to where the markers are (underground dog fence). At least he's doing his job, guarding his territory.

              Michelle



                Plus...Running would be my first reaction which would probably get me killed, the whole stand your ground and growl thing is something I'll tuck away in my mind and hopefully remember it if I need to.
                Dogs are animals with animal instincts. Predator, pack behavior instincts. When you turn and face them, you're a competitor. Another predator. Show no fear, be bigger and meaner, and they'll back down. Maybe. Hopefully. But if they were going to attack, it's your only chance at stopping it. Some people say to do it, but avoid eye contact. Then back away very slowly, still facing them. If you turn and run .... you're no longer a competing predator. You just became prey. Read that word again. You run ... and you're prey. In fact, if you turn and run, it will TRIGGER that reaction in a predator. Even if they were just barking at you to protect their territory, if you turn and run, the back of your legs - and the back of your neck - is going to look really inviting. And if it's more than one dog, their pack instincts will make all of the above infinitely more likely, and infinitely more dangerous. If you own dogs, you've seen the instinct in action. Watch your kids play with your friendly little mutt. Watch what happens when your kid runs away fast. Just a game, but it's the instinct. Your dog will run them down. They take you down, every time, if they can. Of course, all they'll do is smother your face in dog kisses, but the instinct is the same. My 15 pounds pugs do it. Cute as hell when their predator instincts kick in ... not so cute when it's a pit bull or german shepherd or rottweiller (sp?), and they're angry. Running is the worst thing you could do. It can get you killed. Every runner should be made aware of this. /sermon really off this time. Yes, I have the Discovery Channel and Animal Planet in High Definition. Also, I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express last night. (Goofy enough, Zoom?)
                E-mail: JakeKnight2002@aol.com
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                Needs more cowbell!

                  Yes, I have the Discovery Channel and Animal Planet in High Definition. Also, I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express last night. (Goofy enough, Zoom?)
                  Big grin I can't wait to upgrade to an HD TV just for that. Have you been watching that Planet Earth series? I'll bet that's awesome on HD. LOVED that footage of the Snow Leopard. Wouldn't that be a neat predator to see on a run (just so long as he wasn't hungry)? Smile k

                  I shoot pretty things! ~

                  '14 Goals:

                  • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

                  • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

                    In Peru all you had to do to scare away dogs was to pick up a rock. If that didnt work, just holding it like you were about to throw it usually did. Now I know you dont run in Peru very often, and there are probably way more stray dogs wandering around who have had rocks thrown at them there than here, but it may be worth a try! Also, throwing a stick or something in another direction might make him or her chase after it. If a dog is coming at you and it looks like you can't stop him or her - put your knee up. That way if the dog jumps on you, he or she cant get to your face, arms, hands, or torso. For a lot of dogs, just getting the knee is enough that they wont jump on you! I always get scared by the electric-fenced dogs. I dont quite trust them and seeing a dog run at me barking is scarry. When I know there is a dog in the yard I usually try to run on the other side. Note - not all dogs in yards who bark are mean. My parents' dog definately would chase after runners if we let him and tries to bark and lunge at them on walks - and he would jump up and try to play with you if we let him. Does this make it OK for him to run after passer-bys? No! Thats why we are on the other end of the leash on walks. But remember that most dogs just wants to play and are harmless. Of course, you never know whether the dog is friendly or not until it is too late. A dogs job is to chase people and squirels, poop on the sidewalk, eat food left on the kitchen table, etc. An owner's job is to take care of the dog by keeping him or her on a leash or inside, carrying plastic bags, and removing temptations from the table. I am sorry you have to deal with other people's lack of responsibility!
                      Also, throwing a stick or something in another direction might make him or her chase after it.
                      Kind of like when I was a kid and we owned two Siberian Huskies, the male one didn't escape often but when he did, and when I finally caught up to- him all I had to say to get him to come to me was "wanna go for a walk?" ...he'd come trotting over to me, tail wagging, all excited about getting to go for a walk (duh!), and then I'd grab him and drag his furry butt home. The female one we had to keep chained when we put her out, she would scale a fence in seconds and then it would take HOURS to get her back. My luck with throwing a stick is that I would be so nervous I'd throw it like a foot away from me!!

                      Michelle




                      A Dance with Monkeys

                        Stop. Face. Growl.
                        I actually run straight at the dog. And I bark and yell. With a deep voice. Always works, but then again I'm an ugly monkey. But if you bark and show agression to the dog, it will likely tuck tail and run. If the dog ever does come at you and you cannot get away from it, the best thing to try and do is grab the thing by the neck and push its neck downward to the ground with all your force. That will make the dog submit, then run. It may also kill the dog, which is okay since it was trying to kill you. Yes, I have and love a dog. But then again, he has not tried to attack me. Well, except that time when he laced my cereal with rat killer...
                          The other dogs we deal with are at homes with underground dog fences or real fences. I get a little nervous when this one dog rushes full speed to end of his property but then stops without fail, on a dime, when he gets to where the markers are (underground dog fence).
                          The only real scare I've had was with a dog I run by almost every day, who's kept in his yard with an electric fence. This dog is truly vicious - so vicious that I've jokingly called him "Cujo" for a year now. Every day I run by. Very nice neighborhood. Every day he runs right to the edge of the yard, slavering and slobbering and desperate to get to my throat. I thought it was pretty funny. Or used to, anyway. One day, without warning, he doesn't stop. Doesn't even slow down. Before I know it we're nose to nose, and he's baring his fangs, fire in his eyes. And for the record, this was no pit bull. Just some hound mix mutt. With some serious psychosis issues. If it was a pit bull, I'd have been in real trouble. I did just what I'm supposed to do. Froze and turned and bared my own teeth right back. He stopped a foot in front of me knees, with his lip curled and both big fangs dripping. I growl louder, and he won't back down. I take a step back. He takes a step forward. I know perfectly well that if I take one more step away, he's jumping. I lower my hands to protect my nuts. Funny now, but it wasn't then. Because I'm pretty sure that was the target he had in mind. I can hear his owner approaching now, screaming at him. I don't look up. My eyes don't move, because I'm pretty certain that if I even look up, he'll leap. It was really that close. I'm studying him, picking which eyeball I'm going to jam my thumb into to skewer his brain, which leg I'll grab and break. Again, funny now ... but that's what I was thinking. The moment drags on for what seems like an hour. Meanwhile, the owner arrives. With my eyes still on Cujo, I'm screaming obscenities at her. Giving her an impromptu lecture on what exactly her legal liability is going to be in about 10 seconds. I tell her that she has a lovely home - it really is nice - and I'm going to own it, if Cujo pounces. She's bleating and blathering her apologies ... and then it gets really scary. Know why he attacked? Because he's so damn vicious that the electric collar had burned holes in his neck. Bleeding, puss-oozing holes, that I'm now seeing up close and personal. That shouldn't be possible. Most dogs, they get zapped once or twice and never go near the boundary again. Not Cujo. He burned holes in his flesh, he wanted to get at his prey so badly. So what did the owners do? Of course - they just took his collar off. What blithering idiots. Admittedly, with most dogs, it would have been okay. With most dogs, once they get zapped, they don't really need the collar. They stay away from the boundary, collar or no. Not Cujo. Evil little bastard knew he was free and clear as soon as they took it off him. The owner is at my side now. I'm still screaming, and now she's yelling back. Like it's my fault. I seriously consider hitting her, woman or no. But Cujo might not have liked that. The absolute worst part, the only moment I really wondered if I'd be bleeding soon, was when she reached down for him. Because as she bent down, it became very clear that SHE was scared of the dog. Her dog, and she's scared. Jesus, lady, I'm thinking, you're scared to even grab your own dog, and yet I get to deal with him? She moves her hand down way, way slowly, obviously more frightened than I am, and when she finally touches Cerberus the Hell-Hound, he jerks a little and looks up her, still doing that deep-chest growl thing ... and I wonder if I'll end up rescuing this dumb, dumb, dumb woman from her own ugly beast. She finally leads him away, returning my curses. Like I did something wrong, running in a public street. The saddest part is that now Cujo spends his days in a tiny kennel in the backyard. Great big house, and the idiots are too cheap to just put in a decent fence. No wonder the poor thing is vicious. The moral of the story: you're smart not to trust electric fences. Oh - and people really, really suck. -----------------------------
                          E-mail: JakeKnight2002@aol.com
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                          I've got a fever...

                            Irony can be so ironic -- just after I read this thread, I went for a run and got "approached" by a couple of (literally) junkyard dogs! I slowed to a walk, used a calm voice saying, "You don't need to see my ankles. These aren't the calves you're looking for." All the while, I kept my palms downward (hands up can be interpreted as an attempt to strike) and just tried to be like Fonzie. Fortunately, they were just guarding their territory, but it since their territory is behind the frickin' fence, it had me pretty pissed off. Stupid Owners! Angry

                            On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.

                              If a dog is coming at you and it looks like you can't stop him or her - put your knee up. That way if the dog jumps on you, he or she cant get to your face, arms, hands, or torso. For a lot of dogs, just getting the knee is enough that they wont jump on you!
                              I can attest to this method personally. I have been bit a few times (I deserved it one time) but I either instigated it or it was an accident by the dog. The two times I was actually attacked I raised my knee (I learned this from a military dog trainer) and the dog on both occasions hit square on my knee. These weren't small dogs (Rot and a German Shepard) and they were dazed and confused. I could tell it knocked the breath out of the Rot because he started "coughing" and sounding like a cat with a hairball. He took off. The Shepard was a little dazed and started to come back again but I yelled as loud as I could and stomped toward him. Ended the situation... I see dogs all the time when I run but rarely do the seems aggressive. Whenever I run in a new area I never wear my iShuffle so I can listen for the dogs... they usually let you know where they are. Smile
                                Yes, I have and love a dog. But then again, he has not tried to attack me. Well, except that time when he laced my cereal with rat killer...
                                Your wife convinced you that was the dog? Clever woman. Cool And yeah, in case I'm not clear in all the above ramblings, I love dogs. I have three of them. Well, two and a half. One is sort of "special," so I'm not sure she counts as a whole dog. The dogs aren't the problem. As Abbaroodle says, it's irresponsible owners. And even then, 99 times out of 100, a dog running loose isn't going to hurt you. Most of the time, worst case is he'll want to go home with you and hang out at your place. But that 1 time out of 100, you better know what you're dealing with. Think I'm hyping this a bit? This happened within long run distance of where I'm sitting:
                                Pyrenees suspected in Franklin Co. dog mauling can live By LEON ALLIGOOD Staff writer Two Great Pyrenees dogs suspected in the mauling death of a Franklin County woman will not be put down after DNA testing was inconclusive as to whether they participated in the attack, according to District Attorney Mike Taylor. As a result of the testing by the Veterinary Genetics Laboratory at the University of California-Davis, Taylor said his office “is not able to take legal action to dispose of Dr. Gammada’s dogs.” Dianna Acklen, 60, a library clerk, was killed in a dog attack last May. PAcklen was killed as she went on her daily walk down Knight Church Road in rural Franklin County. Three dogs were initially implicated in the attack by authorities: the Great Pyrenees owned by Dr. Ephraim Gammada, and a mixed breed owned by Ronnie Swann, both of whom are Acklen’s neighbors. The mixed breed was put to sleep within days of the attack, but the Gammadas refused to relinquish their animals. Dr. Gammada, in several interviews, said his pets were in their pen when he left his house that day and were in their pen when he returned. The DNA testing by UC-Davis confirmed that the mixed breed was involved in the attack, but reported “at least four other dogs were involved.” Dianna Acklen suffered between 200 and 300 dog bits on her arms, legs and torso.
                                Yeah. 200 or 300 bites. Not sure tossing a stick, or a knee to the chest, or pepper spray, would have helped much. Oh - and best part about that story? Not one person was held legally responsible for that woman's horrific death. Not criminally. Not civilly.
                                E-mail: JakeKnight2002@aol.com
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