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Off Season Difficulties (Read 918 times)

NCPtrack


    Hey new here, so Hi!

     

    I'm XC and Track runner in my Junior year. I've been running track every year, and just started XC this year. (I played soccer the first two years, poor choice.) I had a great first season, I finished with a 16:37 3 mile time. Now trust me, I know that is not even close to phenomenal, but it blew away any expectations I had for the year. 

     

    I started training for Track 2 weeks after the state meet, and I will be running the Mile, 4x800, and 800. I focused on weight training more than running at first because during the XC season I noticed that my shoulders would sometimes cramp up. I was working my way up to 40 miles/week, then winter break hit. I'm really ashamed of myself because the past two weeks have been atrocious. I don't want to say what my mileage was, just assume the worst. Is there a way to recover from my mistake?

     

    As I said before I was planning on working my way up to about 40 miles a week. After doing some surfing around on here, I saw in this thread: http://www.runningahead.com/forums/topic/f45b9a5d700d41b1a3ef35a6d1bcda54 that I should be running 40 to 60 miles a week. This was confusing because my coach specifically said I should not go over 45 miles/week. Is he right or wrong?

     

    The other problem is that all my coach has told me to do is run. Just run. No intervals, no speed work outs, nothing. When I asked him for weight training exercises, he said " Do squats and pull ups." So I did them. But I feel as if I'm missing something. I've done research but i cant tell whats legitimate and whats junk. Any suggestions?

     

    I'm honestly very flustered right now. I WANT to do well. I really do. But I need a shove in the right direction. 

     

    Thank you for any help you can give me. 

     


      Two thoughts:

       

      1. Do you trust your coach? If so, just concentrate on what he's telling you, and don't overthink it.

       

      2. Two weeks isn't enough time to de-condition, even if you sat on your ass every minute of every day. So pick up where you left off, and just go from there.

       

      One more piece of advice: Quit beating yourself up. Get focused, set some forward looking goals, and get to work. Good luck!

        Your coach is counting this as preseason, meaning he just wants you to build a good base going into track season.  That's why most of your mileage should be easy for the time being - you'll go into track season ready to start on speedwork without getting injured and won't risk peaking too early.

        I ran. I ran until my muscles burned and my veins pumped battery acid. Then I ran some more.

         

         

        Future Goals: 5:30 mile • 19:30 5k • 33:30 8k • 42:00 10k • 1:15:00 10-mile • 1:40:00 half-marathon • 1000 miles


        Feeling the growl again

          If you tell most high schoolers to do high mileage or workouts in the off season, the likely result is that most of them that are dedicated will do too much too soon and either peak early or be blown out before the season even starts.  Your coach looks to be trying to get you to run a good amount -- 40-60 mpw is probably more than most of your competition is doing, especially for middle distance runners -- without risking you over-doing it.

           

          It seems entirely reasonable.  If I were coaching a HS runner 1:1 and supervised much of the work I may do things differently, but what he told you is an acceptable directive to give to runners he can't supervise out-of-season (most states' HS rules).

           

          You are running middle distance events.  Do what he's telling you, I'm sure you'll be fine.  XC is a bit different, it it's the same coach, talk to him about your concerns and see if he'll give you a bit more detail.

           

          MTA:  He also said "Run, just run."  He did NOT say "run everything slow".  Big difference.  If you feel great at the end of a run occasionally and want to accelerate and run it in the last few miles, I don't see how that's in conflict with his directive.  Just don't over-do it.

          "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

           

            Hey new here, so Hi!

             

            I'm XC and Track runner in my Junior year. I've been running track every year, and just started XC this year. (I played soccer the first two years, poor choice.) I had a great first season, I finished with a 16:37 3 mile time. Now trust me, I know that is not even close to phenomenal, but it blew away any expectations I had for the year. 

             

            I started training for Track 2 weeks after the state meet, and I will be running the Mile, 4x800, and 800. I focused on weight training more than running at first because during the XC season I noticed that my shoulders would sometimes cramp up. I was working my way up to 40 miles/week, then winter break hit. I'm really ashamed of myself because the past two weeks have been atrocious. I don't want to say what my mileage was, just assume the worst. Is there a way to recover from my mistake?

             

            As I said before I was planning on working my way up to about 40 miles a week. After doing some surfing around on here, I saw in this thread: http://www.runningahead.com/forums/topic/f45b9a5d700d41b1a3ef35a6d1bcda54 that I should be running 40 to 60 miles a week. This was confusing because my coach specifically said I should not go over 45 miles/week. Is he right or wrong?

             

            The other problem is that all my coach has told me to do is run. Just run. No intervals, no speed work outs, nothing. When I asked him for weight training exercises, he said " Do squats and pull ups." So I did them. But I feel as if I'm missing something. I've done research but i cant tell whats legitimate and whats junk. Any suggestions?

             

            I'm honestly very flustered right now. I WANT to do well. I really do. But I need a shove in the right direction. 

             

            Thank you for any help you can give me. 

             


             

            Get off the internet. The shoulder cramps were from diaphragm spasms, not weak shoulders.

             

            In your first year of running and already mileage-obsessed. Awesome.

             

            You need to listen to your coach. Sounds like you are having really good success with him. 

              Hey new here, so Hi!

               

              I'm XC and Track runner in my Junior year. I've been running track every year, and just started XC this year. (I played soccer the first two years, poor choice.) I had a great first season, I finished with a 16:37 3 mile time. Now trust me, I know that is not even close to phenomenal, but it blew away any expectations I had for the year. 

               

              I started training for Track 2 weeks after the state meet, and I will be running the Mile, 4x800, and 800. I focused on weight training more than running at first because during the XC season I noticed that my shoulders would sometimes cramp up. I was working my way up to 40 miles/week, then winter break hit. I'm really ashamed of myself because the past two weeks have been atrocious. I don't want to say what my mileage was, just assume the worst. Is there a way to recover from my mistake?

               

              As I said before I was planning on working my way up to about 40 miles a week. After doing some surfing around on here, I saw in this thread: http://www.runningahead.com/forums/topic/f45b9a5d700d41b1a3ef35a6d1bcda54 that I should be running 40 to 60 miles a week. This was confusing because my coach specifically said I should not go over 45 miles/week. Is he right or wrong?

               

              The other problem is that all my coach has told me to do is run. Just run. No intervals, no speed work outs, nothing. When I asked him for weight training exercises, he said " Do squats and pull ups." So I did them. But I feel as if I'm missing something. I've done research but i cant tell whats legitimate and whats junk. Any suggestions?

               

              I'm honestly very flustered right now. I WANT to do well. I really do. But I need a shove in the right direction. 

               

              Thank you for any help you can give me. 

               


               

              You got great responses from smart people.  This is what Running Ahead Forums are supposed to provide for people.  Listen to these smart people.

               

              Enjoy every step of every mile, and best wishes!

              Cheers,

              2014 Goals:

              #1: Do what I can do. <DOING>

              #2: 365 Hours training <NOPE, INJURED>

               


              Feeling the growl again

                Get off the internet. The shoulder cramps were from diaphragm spasms, not weak shoulders.

                 

                In your first year of running and already mileage-obsessed. Awesome.

                 

                You need to listen to your coach. Sounds like you are having really good success with him. 

                 

                I glossed past this but yes, Jeff is right....weakness has nothing to do with your shoulder issues.  Most to all of the wight lifting you are doing will do nothing for your running.  Do you think the Africans running amazing times have hugely powerful upper bodies?  Nah.  I benched 225 weighing 150 at one point but I was running a heck of a lot faster later one when I stopped lifting, couldn't do 185, but was running a lot more.

                 

                As for mileage obsessed....you are too your to know what mileage level is necessary for you to fulfill your potential.  As I said before, for the track events you are running, the mileage your coach is suggesting are sufficient for you to start with.  From there, talk with him as to whether there are specific adjustments necessary for YOU.  It took me until after college to determine that I needed 70-100 mpw to touch my potential.  Some of my teammates needed half that.  Only time and experience will give you the right answer.  For mid-distance events (anything below 5K), erring on the side of lower mileage is a safer bet with HS runners.

                "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                 

                NCPtrack


                  Sorry for the late reply, I guess I was taking Jeff's advice. 

                   

                  I've started running again this week. I'm on pace to run 30 miles this week, then track season starts. I've also slowed the weight training. 

                   

                  Thanks for your advice everyone. 

                    ... Do you think the Africans running amazing times have hugely powerful upper bodies?  Nah. 

                     

                    Once again, I'd like to point out that it's perfectly possibly to lift without getting a body builder type physique. Plenty of very light, lean runners do some strength training as part of their normal routine.


                    Feeling the growl again

                      Once again, I'd like to point out that it's perfectly possibly to lift without getting a body builder type physique. Plenty of very light, lean runners do some strength training as part of their normal routine.

                       

                      Of course...I used to lift a lot and the only reason I don't now is time...but it's certainly not necessary.  The point I was making was that lifting for your arms is not something you should be doing to help your running.  If you have other reasons to do it, perfectly fine.  Personally I got a lot faster when I stopped lifting and used that time to run more.

                      "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                       

                        Of course...I used to lift a lot and the only reason I don't now is time...but it's certainly not necessary.  The point I was making was that lifting for your arms is not something you should be doing to help your running.  If you have other reasons to do it, perfectly fine.  Personally I got a lot faster when I stopped lifting and used that time to run more.

                         

                        Sure - but the running vs lifting is not necessarily an either/or choice. For me the limit on how much I run is how much my body will tolerate - not how much time I have available for it.


                        Feeling the growl again

                          Sure - but the running vs lifting is not necessarily an either/or choice. For me the limit on how much I run is how much my body will tolerate - not how much time I have available for it.

                           

                          I did not tell you, or anyone else, not to lift.  I told you not to make yourself think that spending that time on lifting is going to make you a better distance runner.

                          "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                           

                            I did not tell you, or anyone else, not to lift.  I told you not to make yourself think that spending that time on lifting is going to make you a better distance runner.

                             

                            Which is, again, a slightly different question.

                             

                            Assuming you're doing as much running as you think is optimal, is there not some marginal benefit in doing some lifting as well?

                             

                            We know that quite a few elites do - so presumably they and their coaches believe there is.

                             

                            Just for the avoidance of doubt - I would agree that for most of us here by far the most important thing to get faster is to run more (and lose weight if you're not already quite light).


                            Feeling the growl again

                              Which is, again, a slightly different question.

                               

                              Assuming you're doing as much running as you think is optimal, is there not some marginal benefit in doing some lifting as well?

                               

                              We know that quite a few elites do - so presumably they and their coaches believe there is.

                               

                              Just for the avoidance of doubt - I would agree that for most of us here by far the most important thing to get faster is to run more (and lose weight if you're not already quite light).

                               

                              If you want to be a stickler about what the question was, the OP was lifting because his shoulders were cramping up.  This is a FORM issue related to him running too tightly, NOT a strength issue.  Weightlifting is not going to help with this and, in fact, may be detrimental if it further tightens him up.

                               

                              There are lots of things which MAY have marginal benefits -- or benefits not directly related to running faster or cramping shoulders -- which may be desired by the coaches who have their athletes lift.  Weightlifting may certainly help with core strength and protect against some types of injuries.  This is, however, in no way related to the original question or the point I was making, which addressed the specific rationale presented by the OP.

                               

                              You have taken a specific comment made to address a specific rationale for lifting made by the OP and internalized it as a much broader knock on your personal training regimen.  You're now defending yourself against a comment that was never made.  If you want to lift knock yourself out.  If I could carve out time for it I would still be lifting...just not because I thought it would lead to a significant improvement in my race times.

                              "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand