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High cadence at slow pace (Read 397 times)


Gang Name "Pound Cake"

    I have to go with mikeymike and not shipo on this. As a drill, running at a high cadence but slow pace can teach the neuromuscular system while at a slow non-stressful pace. This training can then carry over into race conditions. This has been my personal experience. There are other running drills such as skipping, fast feet, high knees, etc., that may look silly, but can improve speed and form. Doing planks might not seem like a running excersise but while planks can't substitute for miles, core strength has been shown to improve running mechanics.

    - Scott

    2014 Goals: First Marathon - BQ2016 <3:40 (3:25:18) - 1/2M <1:45 - 5K <22:00

    2014 Marathons: 05/04 Flying Pig (3:49:02) - 09/20 Air Force (BQ 3:25:18) - 11/01 Indianapolis Monumental

    zonykel


      Jack Daniels, amoug many others noted that the running cadence in top level runners didn't vary regardless of the pace, even in the final kick of the race.

       

      I recall reading a blog by Steve Magness and he mentioned that during the kick, runners go faster by increasing their stride, or increasing their cadence, or both. He also mentioned that 180 is more of an average than a constant.

      JimR


        I recall reading a blog by Steve Magness and he mentioned that during the kick, runners go faster by increasing their stride, or increasing their cadence, or both. He also mentioned that 180 is more of an average than a constant.

         

        That's the way I always understood it.

          I recall reading a blog by Steve Magness and he mentioned that during the kick, runners go faster by increasing their stride, or increasing their cadence, or both. He also mentioned that 180 is more of an average than a constant.

           

          Does it make sense to count the kick at the end?  I think there is a point when you go from running efficiently to sprinting where it becomes necessary to increase your cadence to go faster.

           

          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vni14iuL_TI


          HobbyJogger & HobbyRacer

             

            Does it make sense to count the kick at the end?  I think there is a point when you go from running efficiently to sprinting where it becomes necessary to increase your cadence to go faster.

             

            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vni14iuL_TI

             

            I dunno, but as a study on cadence: the form & cadence of the two competitors looks almost identical as Geb moves into lockstep with Tergat (abt 1:14-1:20)? Then Geb manages to pull ahead just a fraction of a pace in cadence speed?

             

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5D56ZAvcxN0 (Sydney 10000 Geb/Tergat sprint)

            It's a 5k. It hurt like hell...then I tried to pick it up. The end.

              Yes, you increase your cadence when accelerating.

              Runners run.

              jimmyb


                 

                 

                On a treadmill, you will notice a lot of pounding at slower cadences.  Increase your turnover until you are striding lightly, but not straining.

                 

                Thanks for the tip, but I just run naturally now as I wrote, and never think about cadence anymore. Since I switched to less cushioned shoes and wear them for 1500 plus miles, I actually seem to hit the deck a lot softer. I tried an old cushioned pair one day, and it was like "BOOM, BOOM, BOOM" for some reason. Could it be that the body needs no cushioning? But that's for another thread.

                Log    PRs


                I've got a fever...

                   

                  Thanks for the tip, but I just run naturally now as I wrote, and never think about cadence anymore. Since I switched to less cushioned shoes and wear them for 1500 plus miles, I actually seem to hit the deck a lot softer. I tried an old cushioned pair one day, and it was like "BOOM, BOOM, BOOM" for some reason. Could it be that the body needs no cushioning? But that's for another thread.

                   

                  I think it's more that when you run barefoot or in minimalist shoes, you're forced to adjust your stride/turnover to minimize impact.  A overstriding heel-striker won't stay that way for long if they try running barefoot.  Which is why I've always thought that you can get most of the benefits of barefoot/minimalist running by simply increasing turnover and reducing impact.  But yeah, that's another thread.

                  On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.

                    there's scant info around the subject on the wibbly wobbly web, but i'd hazard guesstimates that:

                     

                    1. 98%+ of elites and top amateurs have a cadence >= 180, & 
                    2. 95%+ of all other runner categories <180 

                     

                    reasoning: i can feel it all the way down to muh pluuhms.

                    My leg won't stop mooing.

                     

                    i think i've got a calf injury.

                    justWalk


                      does arms cadence matter?


                      Will Crew for Beer

                        does arms cadence matter?

                         

                        Depends on the activity.

                        2014 Goal: Run Monkey as my first marathon. Brilliant!

                          Runners should develop the ability to run at a variety of cadences suiting a variety of terrain and paces. I sorta think if you focus on running  a variety of paces over a variety of terrain, the cadence stuff will take care of itself. That said, the treadmill is a great place to mess around with cadence because it is boring as hell. Just don't take yourself too seriously while you count your steps or else you will get all tight and over-focused.

                           

                          The best running, regardless of pace, cadence, or terrain, is relaxed, open, and fluid running. If you want a criterion for distinguishing dumb cadence-play from good cadence-play, I'd say that if increasing your cadence interrupts your relaxation and fluidness, then probably you are taking it too far.

                          zonykel


                            does arms cadence matter?

                             

                            For some, it's zero. I prefer to match my feet's cadence :-)

                            sport jester


                            Biomimeticist

                              How nice it is to see that finally someone who agrees with me is speaking up (thanks) to the holes of Daniel's 180 step cadence BS.

                               

                              Cadence isn't some number set in stone, and more importantly for Daniel's BS "studies", what he measured was accomplished on a track, not an open road. I think its funny that his worthless measurements of Olympic competitors in a controlled environment are supposed to apply to everyone as completely absurd to think applicable to a runner running down a street in a marathon or other long distance road race.

                               

                              Thinking the two have anything to do with each other is complete lunacy...

                               

                              First off, Olympic runners are incredibly petite competitors. If you aren't of the same physical stature, then by what definition of logic would you think their cadence has anything to do with optimum running economy for you???

                               

                              How do you think I walk at 9MPH?

                               

                              Trust me; it takes phenomenal stride in step (along with incline) in order to do it.

                               

                              Not to mention that both thoroughbreds and cheetahs have the same 20ft stride length.

                              Experts said the world is flat

                              Experts said that man would never fly

                              Experts said we'd never go to the moon

                               

                              Name me one of those "experts"...

                               

                              History never remembers the name of experts; just the innovators who had the guts to challenge and prove the "experts" wrong

                                How do you think I walk at 9MPH?

                                 

                                 

                                Go T-Rex!

                                 

                                I think I saw you start to run before you asked the camera to shut off, though.

                                 

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