Beginners and Beyond

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Marathoners: Sore the Next Day? (Read 106 times)

scissorbill


    I'm training for my third marathon and ran 22 miles yesterday and was pleasantly surprised to be not sore at all today.  I can't decide if it's the ice bath that I suffered through, the increased weekly miles or the fact that I'm just more acclimated to the distance because it's not my first or second time doing this.  

    So if you can remember, at what point did you no longer get sore after running 20 or more miles?  

    FSocks


    Gramps

      Its less about the miles and more about the intensity of the run.

      Running is dumb. 


      Mostly Harmless

        Its less about the miles and more about the intensity of the run.

         

        +1.  This is my experience as well.  I can run at my long run pace for 20 miles with little to no soreness the next day. My legs will be tired, but not sore.

         "Address the process rather than the outcome.
        Then, the outcome becomes more likely." - Robert Fripp


        Muddling through

          Its less about the miles and more about the intensity of the run.

          +1

          I once ran an unplanned 27 miles and was fine the next day.

          2014 Goals: Run first trail ultra, first 100K, and see what I can do in a 24-Hour race

          GC100k


            Its less about the miles and more about the intensity of the run.

             

            Ya.  I've gone up to 29 miles in training without any soreness.  After a couple of my marathons, my legs did not function for several days.  Intense pain just to the touch.

            happylily


              And I +1 the +1 which +1 FSocks's comment. I also +1 the ya. Big grin

               

              I ran 9 miles with 6x800m at 5k pace last Friday night, one week after my last HM. The next day, I was more sore that I've ever been in my running life. More than after running a slow 24 mile training run. So sore that my gait was affected the next day and on Sunday as well. Hated that feeling...

               

              But I remember also being sore after my LRs, in my first year of running them. If you are not sore now, it's definitely a good sign. Smile

              PRs: Boston Marathon, 3:27, April 15th 2013

                      Cornwall Half-Marathon, 1:35, April 27th 2013

              4 years racing, 16 marathons, 16 BQs     

              Just B.S.


                Its less about the miles and more about the intensity of the run.

                 

                That^^^

                 

                I have done 5 fulls and 25 half and with all honestly I can say the only half's I have every been sore

                from are the first few over 10 years ago and a sub 2 half from 2010 done with 1,500 foot of gain, where

                I truly did work hard for the sub 2.

                 

                I have never been sore from a full simply because I ran for so many years with such a solid base before

                running one and have yet to truly race one. I have always just run them at what felt a comfortable pace

                the entire time.

                 

                This weekend for #6 I hope to be very very sore afterward.Smile

                happylily


                  I have to admit that I was sore for three days after running Boston. I'm only human after all. Big grin

                  PRs: Boston Marathon, 3:27, April 15th 2013

                          Cornwall Half-Marathon, 1:35, April 27th 2013

                  4 years racing, 16 marathons, 16 BQs     

                  Goorun


                    Wow, we all agree on something (so far).Smile

                    If you are sore after LR you ran it either too fast or you are not used to that distance yet (or both).

                    It doesn't mean you are doing it wrong, if it happens once in a while. If it does happen after every long run, something (most often the pace) should be changed.

                    It also takes some experience to know what is a "good soreness" and a "bad soreness".

                    The soreness most people experience after a marathon race is OK, because it was a race and you went all out, but that would be an example od "bad soreness" after a training run.

                    I'm usually sore after shorter intense runs, but never after LRs.

                    My rule of thumb I learned a long time ago from some great runners is that soreness after any workout, no matter how hard, should not last more that 48 hours. If it does, you are most likely over training and pushing your luck on injury front. This does not apply to recovery times after races, especially the long ones.

                    Slow and steady never wins anything.

                    Just B.S.


                      I have to admit that I was sore for three days after running Boston. I'm only human after all. Big grin

                       

                      I don't believe a word of it! I would say superfemme.Big grin

                      Gator eye


                        Good luck with that, I thought almost the same after running a 20, 22 and a 21 with little or no soreness the next day.

                         

                        Two days after Sunday's marathon I still have a hard time standing up and the my calves are on fire.

                          If you're not sore after racing a marathon, assuming you were really intending to race it, then you've done something terribly wrong because you just jogged it.  I can barely walk the day after an all out marathon.  I agree with Goo that if you are sore more than 48 hours after a workout, you overdid it.  When I get into marathon training cycles, I'll typically be sore the first couple of times after 20+ mile long runs.  Once I  am no longer sore on a 20 mile run, I know it's time to start inserting quality work into those runs.

                           

                          I might also note that traditional programs have two or three hard workouts every week.  Canova, who has coached some of the world's best marathon competitors, sometimes has his runners do workouts that are so hard they do nothing but easy work for 10 days afterward.  I'm talking about things like 18 miles at marathon pace.  That completely violates what Goo said and what I agreed with about workouts not leaving you sore more than 48 hours.

                          Short term goal: 17:59 5K

                          Mid term goal:  2:54:59 marathon

                          Long term goal: To say I've been a runner half my life.  (I started running at age 45).

                          Adam_McAllen


                          Beer-and-waffle Powered

                            Wow, we all agree on something (so far).Smile

                             

                            Maybe we can lock and sticky the thread?

                            In the words of my late-coach : Just hang in there, relax... and at the end of a race anyone you see.....just pass them

                            Coastal


                              Great thread  Big grin

                               

                              +1 to the +1 to the +1 to the +1's!


                              Bad Ass

                                This.  I don't usually fet sore after LRs of 20-24, but I might be sore after marathons depending on how I ran them.

                                Its less about the miles and more about the intensity of the run.

                                Damaris, Marathon Maniac, Ultra Runner

                                Blog

                                "The most powerful weapon on earth is the human soul on fire."

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