Beginners and Beyond

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Cardiologist: No more than 4 runs per week at 4mi per run (Read 126 times)

    http://shine.yahoo.com/healthy-living/cardiologists-tell-friends-134500478.html

     

    Somewhat surprised by the very moderate suggestion.

     

    "But new research shows that running even 20 to 25 miles a week, which a lot of women log, can actually age your heart."

     

    I suspect research can be found showing the benefits of more exercise as well.

    Nightvisionrn


      Redbook- the most reputable source of scientific research

        :-)

         

        Well, I found a video of his:

         

        http://vimeo.com/54864015

         

        It was interesting.

        MarjorieAnn3137


        Run to live; live to run

          No citation of what these studies are. I don't buy it.

          • Like nightvisionm I won't believe Redbook. Especially no references. if you believe them you can't have a surprise party either. 

          Marjorie

            I guess people being people with varied genetics, backgrounds, diets, etc...the best is to do what you want and get regular health checks especially if over 40.

             

            I'm at best a half marathon guy, with low-moderate mileage so even if true I'm not concerned.

              http://shine.yahoo.com/healthy-living/cardiologists-tell-friends-134500478.html

               

              Somewhat surprised by the very moderate suggestion.

               

              "But new research shows that running even 20 to 25 miles a week, which a lot of women log, can actually age your heart."

               

              I suspect research can be found showing the benefits of more exercise as well.

               

              Here is the basic text of Dr. James O'Keefe's research which this ridiculous scare-mongering recommendation was based on:

               

              "Dr. O’Keefe and his colleagues present emerging data suggesting that extreme endurance training can 

              cause transient structural cardiovascular changes and elevations of cardiac biomarkers, all of which
              return to normal within one week. For some individuals, over months and years of repetitive injury, this
              process can lead to the development of patchy myocardial fibrosis, particularly in the atria, interventricular
              septum, and right ventricle, and an increased susceptibility to atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. In one
              study, approximately 12% of apparently healthy marathon runners showed evidence for patchy
              myocardial scarring, and the coronary heart disease event rate during a two-year follow up was
              significantly higher in marathon runners than in controls.
              Although it has been recognized that elite-level athletes commonly develop abnormal electrocardiograms
              and atrial and ventricular entropy, these adaptations traditionally have not been thought to predispose to
              serious arrhythmias or sudden cardiac death. However, it now appears that the cardiac remodeling
              induced by excessive exercise can lead to rhythm abnormalities. Endurance sports such as
              ultramarathon running or professional cycling have been associated with as much as a 5-fold increase in
              the prevalence of atrial fibrillation.
              Chronic excessive sustained exercise may also be associated with coronary artery calcification, diastolic
              dysfunction, and large-artery wall stiffening.

               

              Lifelong vigorous exercisers generally have low mortality and disability rates and excellent functional
              capacity, Dr. O’Keefe notes.

               

              He suggests that further investigation is needed to identify who is at risk for
              adverse cardiovascular remodeling, and to formulate physical fitness regimens for conferring optimal
              cardiovascular health and longevity."

               

               

              Full text here

              happylily


                I won't even bother to read the article. My cardiologist installed two disks, large like 50 cents coins, to close the two holes that were in my heart. I had run a marathon 10 days prior to surgery, with his blessing, and when I left the hospital a few days after the surgery, he informed me that I'd be good for another marathon in about 30 days. I was a little upset at him. I wanted to say "Can you let me rest a little, doc?" Big grin My cardiologist is a runner. But he's slower than me. hehehe...

                PRs: Boston Marathon, 3:27, April 15th 2013

                        Cornwall Half-Marathon, 1:35, April 27th 2013

                4 years racing, 14 marathons, 14 BQs     

                  On another forum someone posted the following link citing issues with the studies the good Dr uses:

                   

                  http://www.runnersworld.com/health/too-much-running-myth-rises-again

                  Venomized


                  Drink up moho's!!

                    The author of the article is from REDBOOK and yes of course everything in REDBOOK is factual.

                      And then you have a whole group of people (present company included) that will run anyhow, even if it is true.

                      Take Charge. Train Harder. Suck Less. No Excuses.

                      Adam_McAllen


                      Beer-and-waffle Powered

                        On another forum someone posted the following link citing issues with the studies the good Dr uses:

                         

                        http://www.runnersworld.com/health/too-much-running-myth-rises-again

                         

                        I'm a huge fan of that guy. It's what you get when you cross a national-calibre runner/physicist/journalist.

                        In the words of my late-coach : Just hang in there, relax... and at the end of a race anyone you see.....just pass them

                          Too much of anything may be a bad thing.  The unresolved issue is, "what is too much?"  The fact that the article appears in Redbook does not invalidate the information contained therein.  We really shouldn't be afraid of either a) new information or b) new ways of thinking about old data.

                          Short term goal: 17:59 5K

                          Mid term goal:  2:54:59 marathon

                          Long term goal: To say I've been a runner half my life.  (I started running at age 45).

                          Rubybaby43


                          karate girl

                            I never believe anything I read.  That makes things much easier for me. Big grin

                            Kristy

                            more miles = more beer

                            Luke79


                              I never believe anything I read.  That makes things much easier for me. Big grin

                               

                              Hi there, Kristy.  Long time no see.

                               

                               

                               

                               

                               

                               


                              ORANGE!

                                And then you have a whole group of people (present company included) that will run anyhow, even if it is true.

                                 

                                Yes.  I don't run for health benefits, I run because I love running.  If running were proven to be bad for heart or health, I would still run anyway.

                                 

                                I didn't look at this particular study, but I read a lot of studies related to cancer.  There was a study that caused a lot of panic among Hodgkin's folks about hair loss being equated with chemotherapy effectiveness.  It was based on a grand total of about 30 people.  Always look at the study size (bigger is almost always better) and always look at who they studied (men? women? former smokers? life-long runners?).

                                Jenny loves to run.

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