Beginners and Beyond

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Best Training Plan For "You" (Read 135 times)

LRB


Dreamer

    Because it's easy to follow, gave good results, or helped you achieve your goal.

     

    Did one plan work better for a particular distance, while another worked for a different distance?

    MRT: This too shall pass

    MJ5


    Chief Unicorn Officer

      I don't use a plan, but lately I've been looking into Lydiard and periodization principles (I've actually started a Lydiard-esque base phase). I am averse to plans, though, so I'm really just taking the important elements and putting things together myself.

      Mile 5:49 - 5K 19:58 - 10K 43:06 - HM 1:36:54

      Philliefan33


        I'm still new at this, so I'm making progress just by running more. I've tried to follow a plan a couple of times but it made running feel like work so each time I got fed up with the plan and went back to just running.

         

        That said, I am trying to learn about the purpose of the different kinds of workouts in most plans.  Little by little I am incorporating different kinds of workouts into my running (for example I do long runs regularly and dabble in Fartleks or tempo runs), but it's on my terms, not from a plan

         

        Im not dissing plans-- they just don't work for me right now. Maybe at some point I'll think differently.

        Future Races:

        5/4/14:  Bucks County Ten Miler

        crazyrunninglady


        Warrior Princess

          I'm still new at this, so I'm making progress just by running more. I've tried to follow a plan a couple of times but it made running feel like work so each time I got fed up with the plan and went back to just running.

           

          That said, I am trying to learn about the purpose of the different kinds of workouts in most plans.  Little by little I am incorporating different kinds of workouts into my running (for example I do long runs regularly and dabble in Fartleks or tempo runs), but it's on my terms, not from a plan

           

          Im not dissing plans-- they just don't work for me right now. Maybe at some point I'll think differently.

           

          I used to say that and now I have inspired a poll!

          MJ5


          Chief Unicorn Officer

             

            I used to say that and now I have inspired a poll!

             

            It is an interesting topic, and also branches out into many other areas of running. I like reading all the responses!

            Mile 5:49 - 5K 19:58 - 10K 43:06 - HM 1:36:54

            xor


              This is a trick question.  For example, Daniels (by which I know you mean the book) has a variety of plans.  3 for the marathon distance alone... plus various plans-of-color that aren't specific to a goal race distance.  Etc.

               

              Hanson is interesting because there's a book... which is different from a plan you can buy from Hanson.  Which won't be written by either Hanson brother.

               


              Muddling through

                I've been self-coached for the last 43 years (been running 45 years). I design my own plans when I'm serious about racing otherwise I follow a general structure for my workout schedule but don't fuss over the details. I've found a balance that works well for me emphasizing quality over quantity. That doesn't mean I advocate low mileage, but I have a higher percentage of interval and tempo type workouts than the other choices and my long runs tend to be shorter.

                2014 Goals: Run first trail ultra, first 100K, and see what I can do in a 24-Hour race

                meaghansketch


                  I voted 'Hudson' because it most closely fits the poll, but I want to give a more detailed answer, one which doesn't quite end at Hudson for me.

                   

                  I've been running for about 8 years- My first race was in the summer of 2005 after starting couch to 5K a couple of times.  I started out at age 22 with an incredibly poor aerobic base, having never been into sports--  I nearly failed PE in high school because I couldn't run fast enough.

                   

                  I am a big reader, and in the 8 years since I started, I've read probably more than a dozen running books, and looked at probably twice that number of training plans.  I have had a ton of time to try out different things, to see what worked for me and what didn't.  I think this kind of methodical approach has one of the biggest things that has helped me improve from year to year, from a 10:54 pace for 5 miles to 7:53 pace for the same distance.

                   

                  Of course, nothing beats volume and consistency, and I often joke that if I spent as much time running as I do reading, it wouldn't have taken me nearly so long to make the improvements that I have made Wink

                   

                  The most important thing I learned from Hudson is how to identify my weaknesses and how to train to conquer them.  I looked at my race times across distances, and seeing how far off predictions of longer races were of the actual times, I knew that my biggest 2 deficiencies were

                  1-Aerobic endurance

                  2-Mental fortitude in a longer race

                   

                  I addressed my aerobic endurance weakness by trying to run more miles, and especially trying to run 3-4 times/week runs of at least 8 miles (approx. 80 minutes for me currently).  I think this helped me a lot, since I was finally able to break 2:00 in the half marathon and also set a big PR at 15K.

                   

                  To address the mental fortitude issue, I picked up 'Brain Training for Runners' by Matt Fitzgerald, which I have half-recommended a few times in this forum and on RWOL.  I don't think it's the best training book out there and I don't love all the ideas in it, but the speedwork in that plan follows a clear progression which has worked really well for me-- from 30-sec to 1 min. runs at 3K pace to mile repeats at 10K pace to long stretches at HM pace or M pace.  Some of the workouts are a little out there to me (8 miles at HM pace is more than a tough workout for me, even 6 at HM pace will leave me sore for a couple days) so I feel free to adjust wherever I think it's appropriate.

                   

                  I think one of the best things about following a plan is that if you can identify the key components of a plan, you can figure out what works for you and what doesn't based on your results.  If you're doing one plan and you have a bunch of less-successful races, try something different.  If you're just doing your own thing, it's very difficult to separate out the different components, and identify what might be working for you.

                  Up next: Front Runners New York LGBT Pride 5-mile  06/28 |  NYRR Team Championships: Women (5M) 08/02

                  Goal race: NYCRUNS Haunted Island 10K 10/25

                  Nevrgivup


                    I never used a training plan. I set out my specific workouts a week before or run as I go according to my other obligations in the week. As long as I get the miles in according to my weekly goal, I'm happy.  I run for fun anyway. I don't need it to stress me out.

                    Running is my mental-Ctrl-Alt-Del. 

                    LRB


                    Dreamer

                       I used to say that and now I have inspired a poll!

                       

                      Indeed you have!

                       

                      SRL, since there are so many distances, I left that open for discussion.  So using your example someone could say they used the Daniels red intermediate plan, or his 800 to 1500 meter plan, or one of a half dozen others.

                      MRT: This too shall pass

                        I feel like I can't really answer, because I've only used a couple of plans - Higdon Int II (plus extra miles and tempo runs) and Pfitz 18/55 (with a few extra miles). Both did the job at the time and resulted in PRs. Does that mean they are the "best" for me? Hard to say. I've worked out my own plan based on Hudson's principles and example plan for this spring. I think that after going through it, and rereading the book and my log a few times, I may be in a better place to say what aspects of various plans do or don't work as well for me.

                          I like the Daniels Marathon "A" plan.  It is flippin' brutal.

                          Short term goal: 17:59 5K

                          Mid term goal:  2:54:59 marathon

                          Long term goal: To say I've been a runner half my life.  (I started running at age 45).


                          Mmmmm...beer

                            No plan here, just try to run as often as I can, usually around an hour a day, with a long run on the weekends.  Seems to be working well so far.

                            -Dave

                             

                            2014 Goals | sub-19 5k done! | sub-40 10k | sub-1:25 HM | BQ done! | sub-3 M

                            Better I Leave


                              This newbie votes for the "I don't use a plan" cuz I don't know much about any of these guys. I'm with Dave...I run as often as I can.


                              Bad Ass

                                I like the Pfitz plans.  They work better for my asthma.  Either that or my coach's plan.

                                Damaris, Marathon Maniac, Ultra Runner

                                Blog

                                "The most powerful weapon on earth is the human soul on fire."

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