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Question: Is it better to have a easy run the day after your long run or the day before? (Read 123 times)

FreeSoul87


Runs4Sanity

    Due to my fave babysitter (mommy dearest) taking up zumba classes starting next week  on Tuesday and Thursday, I'm having to adjust my training/running plan. Right now DH's schedule with our business is just so hectic, that I can't depend on him. So I am trying to throw my runs around to keep them on the same days (stupid 7 day week!!! Why not 8 day, or 10 day?) but 2 are going to have to be next to each other. Basically Monday/Wednesday/Friday  and my long run either Saturday or Sunday (you can take a look at my plan). Right now my Monday easy run is 5 miles, my tempo run (Wednesday, middle of week) is 6 miles though I do plan on increasing it to 7 here in a month or after my May HM and my Friday easy run is normally 5 miles but I dropped it down to 3 these past 2 weeks so I could start getting my Heeler mix used to running with me. My long run is currently 9 miles (haven't decided if I am going to wait until after my may HM to increase it to 10 or do a 10 miler in the middle of February and in the middle of March.

    So, either my long run is going to be on Saturday right after my easy run (3 or 5 miles... or 4), or it could be on Sunday and I have my easy 5 mile run the day after.... which I kind of like more. Take note that I am doing my best this year to avoid injury while increasing my mileage and keeping up with 4 weekly runs.

     

    PS: I have had 4 cups of coffee in the last 2 hours so if this doesn't make sense.... Ize sorry.

    *Do It For Yourself, Do It Because They Said It Was Impossible, Do It Because They Said You Were Incapable*

    PRs

    5k - 24:40 (7:57 min/mile pace) 

    10k - 54:39 (8:48 min/mile pace)

    15k -1:24:04 (9:01 min/mile pace)

    13.1 - 1:56:38 (8:54 min/mile pace) Sub 2 hours!!!

     

    xor


      I don't understand the question.  Both are fine, honestly.  Do what you need to do in order to get your volume (mpw over time) up.  That's more important than your long run.  So if you are doing an easy run before or after (or both), is ok.

       

      As for the 7 day week, your training does not necessarily have to lock-in to a seven day week.  That is convenient and it may mesh with real life, but you don't have to focus on a one week period.  This isn't Biggest Loser (side note: their version of "this week" isn't always seven days either).  Do what you need to do.

       

      jamezilla


      Follower of Forrest

        I vote keep it flexible.  Long run saturday or sunday, whichever works better that week.

        6/21 - Manitou's Revenge 54mi

         

        A man may never run the same trail twice for it is not the same trail and he is not the same man


         

        FreeSoul87


        Runs4Sanity

          The question or concern is, would either make a difference in preventing a injury. Would it be better to run an easy 5 mile after a 9+ mile long run, or run my 9 + the day after a 3-5 mile run? My goal is to now keep my weekly mileage above 20 for the most part, without overdoing it and injuring myself. I was doing my tempo run and then a easy run the day after, which was working fine. Right now I am having a hard time keeping my easy runs nice and slow, so I am just wondering if it would be more beneficial to doing my easy run the day after my long run.

          *Do It For Yourself, Do It Because They Said It Was Impossible, Do It Because They Said You Were Incapable*

          PRs

          5k - 24:40 (7:57 min/mile pace) 

          10k - 54:39 (8:48 min/mile pace)

          15k -1:24:04 (9:01 min/mile pace)

          13.1 - 1:56:38 (8:54 min/mile pace) Sub 2 hours!!!

           

          FreeSoul87


          Runs4Sanity

            I vote keep it flexible.  Long run saturday or sunday, whichever works better that week.

             

            I might have to do that.

            *Do It For Yourself, Do It Because They Said It Was Impossible, Do It Because They Said You Were Incapable*

            PRs

            5k - 24:40 (7:57 min/mile pace) 

            10k - 54:39 (8:48 min/mile pace)

            15k -1:24:04 (9:01 min/mile pace)

            13.1 - 1:56:38 (8:54 min/mile pace) Sub 2 hours!!!

             

            RSX


              The question or concern is, would either make a difference in preventing a injury. Would it be better to run an easy 5 mile after a 9+ mile long run, or run my 9 + the day after a 3-5 mile run? My goal is to now keep my weekly mileage above 20 for the most part, without overdoing it and injuring myself. I was doing my tempo run and then a easy run the day after, which was working fine. Right now I am having a hard time keeping my easy runs nice and slow, so I am just wondering if it would be more beneficial to doing my easy run the day after my long run.

              Better is what works for you. As for preventing injury back off when need be as you set your limits.

               

              I usually do 6 on Saturday, and maybe 12 on Sunday. On Monday I do an easy 4. (to be tweaked more once I start training for 26.2) I never did 6 day weeks my whole life until the Summer. After trial and error this works for me. I used to take a day off after my longest runs and always felt stiff.

                Who gets running advice from a running forum?

                 

                Sorry, I just came from that other thread, and am all worked up.

                Dave

                Coastal


                  Just plan your week with a pencil, and make changes as needed.  It's all good.  Just keep getting in your weekly mileage, and maybe increase it some if you can. Don't be afraid to experiment a little and you might find what works best for you.

                  Jnfr Jogs


                    My partner has been training for a HM in March - she researched and found advice to run an easy run the day after the long run to help train those muscles that help pick up the slack when your main running muscles have tuckered out - something important for distance running.  Keep it short and keep it easy.  If you are having trouble running at a slow enough pace you should shorten the distance/duration of the recovery run. This has worked well for her - she is now clocking about 30 mpw leading up to early March race day.


                    YAYpril - B-Plus

                      My running group meets on Saturdays for an hour, so most of the time I run 5 or 6 on Saturday and run long on Sunday. Occasionally I'll meet someone early on Saturday and run long and then a short run on Sunday. It's really irrelevant which way I do it. The only problem I find sometimes is lack of motivation on Sunday to run a couple if my long run was done on Saturday.

                        Just my two cents.  People think a long run isn't a quality workout like intervals or a tempo run but it is.  Ergo, I have always found that I recover much better if I take it very easy the next day.  Of course, that also means you can't go out and run hard the day before because you'll be too fatigued to run your long run at the appropriate pace.  I suppose what I'm suggesting is that you treat your long run like any other quality workout - don't go into it overly fatigued and give yourself time to recover.

                         

                        Of course, none of us can train ideally since we don't get paid to run so you do the best you can with how it fits into your life and keep on keeping on.  It is interesting that you talk about a 10 day week as I have seen it suggested that the ideal training cycle would be about a 10 day cycle.  Unfortunately, we do have to fit our running in around the rest of our lives so, for most of us, that means long run on the weekend.

                        Short term goal: 17:59 5K

                        Mid term goal:  2:54:59 marathon

                        Long term goal: To say I've been a runner half my life.  (I started running at age 45).

                        FreeSoul87


                        Runs4Sanity

                          I'll try to keep flexible, while keeping a plan to look over because that helps me. My biggest concern like LTH says is I don't want to be fatigued and sore the day of my long run so I don't think I would want to run the day before my long run, but maybe an easy run/jog the day after might not hurt and I could always change it up if I need to, and even take rest days when needed.

                          *Do It For Yourself, Do It Because They Said It Was Impossible, Do It Because They Said You Were Incapable*

                          PRs

                          5k - 24:40 (7:57 min/mile pace) 

                          10k - 54:39 (8:48 min/mile pace)

                          15k -1:24:04 (9:01 min/mile pace)

                          13.1 - 1:56:38 (8:54 min/mile pace) Sub 2 hours!!!

                           


                          Ultra Cowboy

                            I find that resting the day before my long run and an easy run the day after helps me.  When I started training for a 50k last year, my schedule introduced back to back "LONG" runs.  I dreaded the second run, but I have come to enjoy them now.  I rest the next day and DOMS is greatly reduced for me.

                            I'm a rambler, I'm a gambler, I'm a green lumber handler, I'm a gypo from Pelican Bay....

                            daisymae25


                            Squidward Bike Rider

                              I flip-flop my weekend long and shorter runs all the time.  Heck, when I was training for the RW Hat Trick, they had me doing speed work on Saturdays and running long on Sundays to prepare for running shorter, faster races the first day and the longer race the next day.