Beginners and Beyond

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Headlamp during snowstorm? (Read 266 times)

runs with dogs


    The other day I ran my first "in-the-dark-while-snowing" run  (It wasn't snowing so hard that it was dangerous to be out there, but it was snowing more than just the equivalent of a sprinkle) and I found that my headlamp did a GREAT job of lighting up the snow falling in front of my face so I couldn't see much else.  Anyone have suggestions for how to deal with that?  I tried every brightness level possible on the headlamp and nothing really helped, and handheld isn't an option because of juggling the dog's leash.  (She's a rescue who is still working on leash training so she pulls a lot and I constantly switch the leash from one hand to the other during our runs.) 

    Thanks!


    Rungry!

      I have no suggestions, but have noticed the same problem with rain and mist...

      Jen

      xor


        Yes.  Trade the headlamp for a little handheld flashlight.

         

        Oh wait.  You can't.  (FOOEY)

         

        There is no magic setting that's going to fix the headlamp from doing this.  It has to do with where the beam is sourced.  You could rig something to shine from your belt or if you wear a backpack, from the sternum strap or waist strap.

         

        LRB


        Dreamer

          When driving at night in a snow storm on say a freeway, you will often find you can see better with the lights off. 

           

          If you have never experienced this, try it the next time it's snowing at night and it is safe to do so.  Drive with regular light, high beams, and no lights.  You will likely find that you can see better and clearer with the lights off.

           

          I don't have an answer for what to do while running, except to deduce that from my experience, you may try running without a light while it's snowing.

          "Training is not always fun, but it should always be rewarding."

          td2059


            Kuckle Lights .....maybe ?

              The fog gets me like this in the mornings. I point the light further up just to make me more visible and enjoy he run, even though I can't see too far in front of me.

              ”Failing to prepare is preparing to fail.”

              “Whether you think you can, or you think you can't--you're right.”

               

              Tomas

                Put headlamp around waist or attach to sternum strap or something along those lines. I experimented with heights a few years ago, and the big thing was to put light below eyes. Chest level worked about right, iirc. But I never did anything about rigging up something. When I put it around my waist it waved back and forth across the trail - guess I twist at the waist too much. That's why the chest seemed better to me. As SRL mentioned, flashlight is an alternative if you don't mind carrying something in your hands, esp. if it's really cold.

                 

                Oh, if it's really cold, use lithium batteries - expensive upfront, but cheaper by the time one considers their shelf life, how long they last esp. in cold, and the fact they work at all in the cold. (standing joke here used to be can you lock your house door behind you before the batteries in your headlamp were reduced to useless. that's with alkaline. I think NiMH are better than alkaline but not as good as lithium.)

                "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog


                sugnim

                  I actually love when my headlamp lights up the snowflakes as they fall.  They look like a million shooting stars & I imagine I am flying through space!  Big grin

                  mucknort


                     I found that my headlamp did a GREAT job of lighting up the snow falling in front of my face so I couldn't see much else.  Anyone have suggestions for how to deal with that? 

                     2 suggestions.

                    -If you must use a headlamp, try pointing it almost straight down. This is the idea behind fog lamps on a car. Aiming the light low will provide light for directly in front of you without illuminating the snow falling in front of you.

                    -Take the time to allow your eyes to adjust to the darkness and go w/o a light. You'd be amazed how much your pupils will dialate and allow you to see in very low light if you'll give them 15 minutes to adjust to the dark. If you run near street lights or other lighting, do you best to then avoid looking at them and ruining your night vision. Same goes if a car approaches you, sheild their headlights from your eyes by using the non-leash holding hand. I've taught this with many groups outdoors and people are always amazed how much they can "see" once they go without a flashlight.


                    day after day sameness

                      I run in falling snow fairly often with a headlamp and find that using a hat (cap?) with a bill helps a lot when running in falling snow or heavy rain. The light is above the bill and your face is in a shadow created by the bill.  I'll use a running cap over my warm hat.

                      Choosing my words carefully has never been my strength I've been known to be vague and often pointless

                      runs with dogs


                        Thanks everyone for the suggestions.  I'll try them out next time I'm in those conditions again.  I tried running without a light at all and found I could see well enough to run except for the giant potholes in the road (I live and run on an old, not very well kept dirt road).  Hopefully they'll be full of packed snow soon so that won't be a problem! Smile

                        RagRabbit


                          I have a very good headlamp and agree that the light reflected back is a problem, but so far hasn't been so bad that I can't run with it.  Some nights, it's actually fun because you feel you're experiencing a whole new trail.  Not having a lamp is just not an option. 

                           

                          We no longer live in snow country, but heavy rain or fog at night can be just as bad when it comes to headlamps.  However, they don't compare to polished ice under a light layer of new snow.

                           

                          Unless there are virtually no cars when you run, a good light is essential for being seen.  You have to assume that the drivers have the same issues with their headlamps reflecting back....so imagine their surprise if they suddenly see a runner and a dog appear with only a dim light or none at all.

                           

                          Ideally, you would have the lamp down by your ankles, sort of like fog lights on a car...but when I've noticed runner doing that, their light often disappears from view.  Belt or chest mount can work, but I like the functionality of a headlamp that moves with my eyes as my head turns.  Angling the beam 15-20 degrees away from where your eyes are looking can help and you may have enough light-scatter to still illuminate the trail.


                          Wandering Wally

                            When it's snowing I often go without a light entirely unless I am on a road.  Then I will point it low.  You will be surprised at how bright it is with all that fresh snow on the ground.

                            Run!  Just Run!

                             

                            Trail Runner Nation Podcast

                            cloark


                              When driving at night in a snow storm on say a freeway, you will often find you can see better with the lights off. 

                               

                              If you have never experienced this, try it the next time it's snowing at night and it is safe to do so.  Drive with regular light, high beams, and no lights.  You will likely find that you can see better and clearer with the lights off.

                               

                              I don't have an answer for what to do while running, except to deduce that from my experience, you may try running without a light while it's snowing.

                               

                               

                              I just wanted to remind everyone that while LRB is correct, don't drive with your headlights off in a snowstorm.  You might be able to see ok, but no one is going to be able to see you.  Same thing goes for running.  Even if it is light enough to see without the light, point it at the ground or behind you, or anywhere to help people see you.

                              runswithkona


                                I run with my dog also at night and I've found that hanging my headlamp around his neck casts a nice low beam of light on the ground.  

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