Beginners and Beyond

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Racing: The Moment of Truth (Read 131 times)

happylily


    I think I'd run without racing, but I'm glad that I don't have to.  I love racing, but only to see how fast I can go at the given distance.  With that in mind, I race pretty infrequently so that I can run full training cycles geared toward a particular distance (or use indicator races to further help me prep).  I enjoy the training, but only in the sense that I know it's helping me build fitness so that I can meet my goals.

     

    Also, I prefer bigger races because I like the fact that they feel "special."  I realize I'm far less likely to finish near the top at these events, but I really don't go to races for anything other than to race myself.  That may make it seem like I wouldn't need to race and could just run time trials, but I think we all know that the race atmosphere has a way of bringing about our best performances.

     

    Lastly, my preference is racing the marathon because it gives me a great sense of accomplishment.  I know just as much effort can go into racing a fast 5k, but for me I'd rather race a fast marathon.

     

    I feel that way too. I know a lot of people, usually those who prefer the shorter distances, will call running a marathon "jogging". But for me, it's really racing it. Plus, training for marathons has made me fast (relatively speaking) in the 5 and 10k distances. So I get the best of both worlds.

    PRs: Boston Marathon, 3:27, April 15th 2013

            Cornwall Half-Marathon, 1:35, April 27th 2013

    4 years racing, 16 marathons, 16 BQs     

    So_Im_a_Runner


    Go figure

       

      I feel that way too. I know a lot of people, usually those who prefer the shorter distances, will call running a marathon "jogging". But for me, it's really racing it. Plus, training for marathons has made me fast (relatively speaking) in the 5 and 10k distances. So I get the best of both worlds.

       

      My marathons are only "jogs" if you can beat me.  Otherwise, I don't wanna hear about it Smile  You and I always seem to have the same philosophy in response to these kind of questions.  I agree about marathon training working for other distances too.  My recent 5 mile PR was just on marathon training, and I was really proud of that time.  With just a little sharpening, even like a 4-6 week cycle, I think I could drop about a minute off my 5k time right now too.

      PRs:  Marathon (2:49xx; '13)  Half (1:25xx; '12) 10k (40:26; '11) 5mi (29:23; '13) 5k (17:33; '13)

      happylily


         

        My marathons are only "jogs" if you can beat me.  Otherwise, I don't wanna hear about it Smile  You and I always seem to have the same philosophy in response to these kind of questions.  I agree about marathon training working for other distances too.  My recent 5 mile PR was just on marathon training, and I was really proud of that time.  With just a little sharpening, even like a 4-6 week cycle, I think I could drop about a minute off my 5k time right now too.

         

        +1! And awesome work, SIAR!

        PRs: Boston Marathon, 3:27, April 15th 2013

                Cornwall Half-Marathon, 1:35, April 27th 2013

        4 years racing, 16 marathons, 16 BQs     

        GinnyinPA


          I'm a fairly new runner. I started running in Aug. 2012.  I've only run two 5ks and trained for two HMs that never happened due to injury.  When I started running, I never thought I'd get involved in racing, since I know I'm slow and money is tight.  However, I was amazed at how much I enjoyed the 5ks.   I also was surprised at how having a goal to work toward made a difference.  I wasn't just running, I was training.  It changed me from a 3 day a week runner to a 5 day runner.  It got me doing intervals and tempo runs.  It got me to increase my distance on my long runs, far beyond what I would have done otherwise.  I really liked building my mileage in preparation for longer races.  It gave me goals - and I like having goals.

           

          Since I started over again, post injury, I've been really split on when or whether to start racing again.  It was trying to do too much too soon that gave me my pelvic sfx.  I thought it might be better for me to just spend several months building a base without worrying about speed, or pushing to increase my long runs.  But I also found myself really sad at missing the spring HM season.  Reading RRs, makes me very envious.  I really wanted to get out and start racing, but I knew I wasn't ready.  So for the past 5 months I've just run by mood and energy.  I run 3 or 4 days a week, up to 25 mpw.  I haven't signed up for any races.  I wasn't great at following my plan before, so having no plan has been nice.  Since I've missed all the local long races, I have no pressure to push too hard, I just run for fun.  It's been good.

           

          But I spend a lot of time thinking about when I'll be able to race again.  Doing a half marathon is still my goal, and eventually a full marathon, but not yet.  I plan to do some short races, starting this month, just to see where my fitness is right now, and to see if they are really as much fun as I remember, but for the next few months, I'll  keep on just running for pleasure, as the mood strikes me.

             

            I feel that way too. I know a lot of people, usually those who prefer the shorter distances, will call running a marathon "jogging". But for me, it's really racing it. Plus, training for marathons has made me fast (relatively speaking) in the 5 and 10k distances. So I get the best of both worlds.

             

            Those people are wrong.  Smile
            If 5Ks are checkers, marathons are chess.

             

            I would still run without racing;  I spent quite some time between my early 20's and now doing just that.  But races are a strange duality to me -- on one hand, I will try to beat anyone near my pace because, well, that's what we're out there for.  On the other hand, I really just enjoy the atmosphere and would rather lose a cliffhanger kick than win unopposed.

             

            Races are a celebration of the hard work we all put in -  fast, slow, young, old.  To show up at a race signifies that you're working hard (or are extremely stupid and won't come to another).  I think that's why the Prefontaine quote about "having to bleed to beat me" has always seemed like misplaced machismo to me.

            tinman11


              Thus far I have only failed to achieve my goal for one race.  I wanted to run sub 1:50 at the HM in Baltimore last year and I missed that by about a minute.  I thought that would bother me a lot and was really surprised when it didn't.

               

              This is interesting.  I have a 1/2 PR at 1:45:43 but my full PR is 4:13:47.  Your PR for the full looks pretty impressive.  I'm thinking you're about to knock out your target goal for the half.

               

              As far as training goes, I agree with you and Lily.  I enjoy setting up the schedule and following it rain or shine.  I'll take an unscheduled day off if I need it but that's rare.  When life stuff gets in the way I'm more likely to head out at 10:00 PM in the rain to make sure I do hit the goal for the day.

               

              I ran the Country Music 1/2 Marathon one year and Dave Ramsey started right beside me.  We chatted for a little while before the start.  He beat me by about 5 minutes that day.


              No more marathons

                Running without racing would be about the same as doing situps and pushups.  Done just for the sake of exercise.  I need the competition, even if it's only with myself.  I used to play a lot of tennis and racketball.  Did lots of practice to improve, but would not have seen the purpose of just practicing and never competing.

                If I couldn't race, I''d probably stop running.

                 

                Ah - one exception - I do most of my running at lunch time - gets me out of the office, otherwise I'd just keep working.  So I guess for that reason I might keep running.Big grin.


                Muddling through

                   

                  Those people are wrong.  Smile
                  If 5Ks are checkers, marathons are chess.

                   

                  You got that backwards. And the mile is lightning chess.

                  2014 Goals: Run first trail ultra, first 100K, and see what I can do in a 24-Hour race

                    I started running because I was fat and out of shape and I was tired of being fat and out of shape.  I never want to be fat and out of shape again.  So, even if I stop racing, I'll keep running.

                     

                    With that out of the way, I can't see myself ever completely stopping racing.  I may quit training for specific races.  I may quit doing certain workouts.  At some point, I may not go to races and run all out.  Still, I can't see myself as one of those folks who goes to races and just jogs and smiles.  I want to always be challenging myself.  Besides, I like doing tempo runs and intervals and hill sprints.  (I hate long runs).

                    Short term goal: 17:59 5K

                    Mid term goal:  2:54:59 marathon

                    Long term goal: To say I've been a runner half my life.  (I started running at age 45).

                    Zentastic


                    Chasing Rainbows

                      For me running is more of a meditative activity rather than a competitive activity.  I ran for 20 years before entering my first race.

                      The obstacle is the path. - Zen proverb

                      Buelligan


                        For me running is more of a meditative activity rather than a competitive activity.  I ran for 20 years before entering my first race.

                         

                        I run mostly for fitness and to help keep my weight down.  It was years before I could comtemplate anything during a run besides the urge not to stop.  Eventually I did get to a point where I could free associate random thoughts, but it's not like I was figuring much out with all that bouncing and huffing and puffing.  My mind just wanders all over the place... which in itself is quite meditative, I guess.  It's something I really like about running.

                         

                        It wasn't until I was 40 that I entered my first real race, a race I was actually kind of in shape for.   I really enjoyed it and raced pretty hard core for the next few years... but when it comes down to it, I don't really need racing to run, I only race because I'm running anyway.  I don't race for fun, I race to compete... and I don't always have to compete.

                         

                        That being said, I'm actually training to race this year... a big change in my program.  May as well see how fast the nag can run before dropping.

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