Beginners and Beyond

Do you remember how to write? (Read 213 times)


You Rang?

    Oh, I can still do it.  I still know how to do caligraphy as well.

     

    A a sidenote, I still cannot believe how some people take the bar exams in writing.  Every time I see someone bring a yellow tablet to court, I look up to see they are at least in their 5th decade.

     

     

    I don't mean to be a contrarian here, but  I've taken two bar exams and hand wrote them both.  I passed them both too. I'm taking the Cal. Bar Legal Specialist Certification Exam in October and I'm handwriting it.  I bring a yellow pad and pen to court (along with the client file) and I am not in my 5th decade.

     

    Rick

    Rick 

    PR: 5k 26:17 (10/13) 10k: 57:44 (7/14) HM: 2:18:26 (9/13) FM: 5:29 (1/14)


    Bad Ass

      *Shudder*

       

       

      I don't mean to be a contrarian here, but  I've taken two bar exams and hand wrote them both.  I passed them both too. I'm taking the Cal. Bar Legal Specialist Certification Exam in October and I'm handwriting it.  I bring a yellow pad and pen to court (along with the client file) and I am not in my 5th decade.

       

      Rick

      Damaris, Marathon Maniac, Ultra Runner

      Blog

      "The most powerful weapon on earth is the human soul on fire."

        George Zimmerman witness can't read letter she 'wrote'.

        Timely thread.

        Read this, and thought of this post.

        2014 Goals:

        #1: Do what I can do. <DOING>

        #2: 365 Hours training <NOPE, INJURED>

         


        Bad Ass

          I read about her testimony this morning and thought the same.  I was: she can't read her own writing?

           

          George Zimmerman witness can't read letter she 'wrote'.

          Timely thread.

          Read this, and thought of this post.

          Damaris, Marathon Maniac, Ultra Runner

          Blog

          "The most powerful weapon on earth is the human soul on fire."

          LRB


          Dreamer

            George Zimmerman witness can't read letter she 'wrote'.

             

            Yeesh, that's not a good look.  But nothing about that case surprises me anymore.

            MRT: This too shall pass


            Pass the coffee.

              I visited a 5th grade classroom for career day, and was placed in the 'Literature' room.  I was surprised to find the teach teaching cursive - while not required she feels it has historical significance.  Our founding fathers wrote all our important documents in cursive.

               

              I hadn't even considered the importance of a legal signature.


              Hip Hip Hooray

                George Zimmerman witness can't read letter she 'wrote'.

                Timely thread.

                Read this, and thought of this post.

                 

                :slaps head:

                 

                Buelligan


                  My niece learned how to write using "cursive" this year in the 4th grade.  She loved learning it, said it made her feel grown up.

                   

                  I still use it for taking notes... it's just so much quicker than printing.  I always take notes on a yellow legal pad... in red ink.  I like the contrast.

                   

                  I agree this was a very timely thread considering the news from the Zimmerman trial.


                  ORANGE!

                     

                    I don't mean to be a contrarian here, but  I've taken two bar exams and hand wrote them both.  I passed them both too. I'm taking the Cal. Bar Legal Specialist Certification Exam in October and I'm handwriting it.  I bring a yellow pad and pen to court (along with the client file) and I am not in my 5th decade.

                     

                    Rick

                     

                    When I took the Ohio Bar exam in 2005, you had no choice but to hand write.  And, I also still bring a yellow pad and pen to court, along with a printed client file.  Smile

                    Jenny loves to run.

                      So what's the deal with lawyers and yellow pads anyway? White paper not good enough for you? Never knew why legal pads were always yellow; my dad was a lawyer so I grew up surrounded by them, but never bothered to ask. Not that he would've had an answer. Of course you can google that kind of thing now, but I am not finding any truly satisfactory answers. All that comes up was that it hides poorer quality & aging paper, and that the color is considered to be more "intellectually stimulating". Doesn't seem to be working for anyone in the Zimmerman trial.

                      Dave


                      Bad Ass

                        We have yellow pads at my office but only one attorney uses them, the same one that prints everything from the docket.  The court has gone paperless and we try to have the least amount of anything in paper as possible.

                         

                        I write on the computer and bring a typed sheet.  Easier to read under pressure, at least for me.

                        Damaris, Marathon Maniac, Ultra Runner

                        Blog

                        "The most powerful weapon on earth is the human soul on fire."

                        SusanRachel


                          I definitely remember how, but it takes me longer than printing and is hard to read.  And no, it is not a necessary life skill in the computer age.


                          ORANGE!

                            I just use whatever the firm supplies.  Why legal pads are yellow, I don't know.  Our paralegal orders what is on sale, so we sometimes have had white legal pads.

                             

                            All of our client files are scanned and electronic, but it is easier to have actual documents when going to court.  We work with a lot of repair orders and things like that.  A lot of these documents don't scan well and are easier to read on a piece of paper.

                             

                            We don't have iPads or laptops in the office for note taking.  We're too small and too broke to have stuff like that.  If a partner calls you in to draft something or do a project, you bring a legal pad and a pen and jot down notes on what he wants you to do.

                            Jenny loves to run.


                            Bad Ass

                              Some areas of the law are less prone to be paperless and I think yours is one of them.  Bankruptcy (if the matter is easy) is one that allows you not to have that much paper with you.  Most of what we do in court is arguing (moot court like) and judges hate for you to bring exhibits, so most of us file them and announce the docket entries in court.

                               

                              We also don't have any electronics so I am jealous of he opposing counsel's ones.  If I take my government provided blackberry, I might as well hit counsel with it for all the use it provides.

                               

                              I just use whatever the firm supplies.  Why legal pads are yellow, I don't know.  Our paralegal orders what is on sale, so we sometimes have had white legal pads.

                               

                              All of our client files are scanned and electronic, but it is easier to have actual documents when going to court.  We work with a lot of repair orders and things like that.  A lot of these documents don't scan well and are easier to read on a piece of paper.

                               

                              We don't have iPads or laptops in the office for note taking.  We're too small and too broke to have stuff like that.  If a partner calls you in to draft something or do a project, you bring a legal pad and a pen and jot down notes on what he wants you to do.

                              Damaris, Marathon Maniac, Ultra Runner

                              Blog

                              "The most powerful weapon on earth is the human soul on fire."


                              ORANGE!

                                Some areas of the law are less prone to be paperless and I think yours is one of them.  Bankruptcy (if the matter is easy) is one that allows you not to have that much paper with you.  Most of what we do in court is arguing (moot court like) and judges hate for you to bring exhibits, so most of us file them and announce the docket entries in court.

                                 

                                We also don't have any electronics so I am jealous of he opposing counsel's ones.  If I take my government provided blackberry, I might as well hit counsel with it for all the use it provides.

                                 

                                 

                                We bring many cases under the FDCPA, and I love the Federal ECF system for filing and getting notice.  For our Lemon Law cases, we almost always file in state court.  Ohio has 88 counties, and the availability of electronic filing is an exception rather than the rule.  Many don't even have any form of fax filing.  Some of the counties don't even have court websites!  I like the Federal system for the uniformity.  There are some differences in the local rules for the Southern versus Northern District of Ohio, but they are very minor.  Trying to keep track of 88 sets of local rules on how long you have to respond, how to file a complaint, how much it costs to file that complaint, whether you can e-file/fax file, etc. is a nightmare.

                                 

                                We do scan in all of our client documents into an electronic file.  We only print things out to make a file when we actually need to go to court.  (We're very much a volume practice, and a lot of our cases don't even reach the point where there is a pre-trial.)  Lemon Law/MMWA cases really just turn upon the vehicle's repair orders.

                                Jenny loves to run.