Beginners and Beyond

12

Question on the Heel to toe drop (Read 131 times)

FreeSoul87


Runs4Sanity

    What the heck is heel to toe drop?

    *Do It For Yourself, Do It Because They Said It Was Impossible, Do It Because They Said You Were Incapable*

    PRs

    5k - 24:40 (7:57 min/mile pace) 

    10k - 54:39 (8:48 min/mile pace)

    15k -1:24:04 (9:01 min/mile pace)

    13.1 - 1:56:38 (8:54 min/mile pace) Sub 2 hours!!!

     

    So_Im_a_Runner


    Go figure

      Shoes have a stack height, which is how far they sit off the ground.  Typically, those numbers vary between the heel and forefoot, so you'll see something like this:

       

      heel 32mm

      forefoot 23mm

       

      For that shoe, the drop would be 9mm, or the difference between the height of the heel and the toe.

      PRs:  Marathon (2:49xx; '13)  Half (1:25xx; '12) 10k (40:26; '11) 5mi (29:23; '13) 5k (17:33; '13)

      FreeSoul87


      Runs4Sanity

        Okay......... do they effect you? Like when running in them, is there a difference between the different drops?

        *Do It For Yourself, Do It Because They Said It Was Impossible, Do It Because They Said You Were Incapable*

        PRs

        5k - 24:40 (7:57 min/mile pace) 

        10k - 54:39 (8:48 min/mile pace)

        15k -1:24:04 (9:01 min/mile pace)

        13.1 - 1:56:38 (8:54 min/mile pace) Sub 2 hours!!!

         

          Okay......... do they effect you? Like when running in them, is there a difference between the different drops?

           

          Short answer= yes.

           

          they'll force you to use different muscles, specifically in your calves and feet. It can be a weird (but good) sensation when you try a shorter drop for the first time.

          So_Im_a_Runner


          Go figure

            Eh, it's a pretty long discussion.  The current trend is definitely to reduce the drop in shoes, in favor of something that's closer to a 0 drop (same heel and toe height).  One thing that's pretty apparent is that a lower drop will put more pressure on your achilles and calf, so it's wise to transition slowly when going with a more minimal drop.

             

            The other variable that's really in play is what type of strike you have, be it a heel, mid foot, or forefoot strike and how that changes or is influenced by the shoe drop.

             

            All these issues are really why getting out and trying shoes on is pretty worthwhile.

            PRs:  Marathon (2:49xx; '13)  Half (1:25xx; '12) 10k (40:26; '11) 5mi (29:23; '13) 5k (17:33; '13)

              i am big, flat footed, and over pronate. I wear the brooks beast. I think it has a 16mm drop.

              ”Failing to prepare is preparing to fail.”

              “Whether you think you can, or you think you can't--you're right.”

               

              Tomas

              cmb4314


                Low heel to toe drop does use really different muscles than shoes with a larger drop.  For me, I felt it a lot in my calves, and the biggest thing that it stressed was the bottom of my feet.  I got a pair of Brooks PureCadence to play around with for shorter runs, and my first 2 mile run in the things gave me PF.

                 

                I haven't gotten around to it yet, but I'd love to work up to them slowly, because it would result in increased flexibility and strength in my lower legs which can't hurt.

                My wildly inconsistent PRs:

                5k: 24:36 (10/20/12)  

                10k: 52:01 (4/28/12)  

                HM: 1:50:09 (10/27/12)

                Marathon: 4:19:11 (10/2/2011) 

                FreeSoul87


                Runs4Sanity

                  I am pretty sure I am either a midfoot or a heel striker.

                  I will have to take a look at the heel to toe drops in all my shoes and then think about which one feels best for me.

                  Shocked all my shoes have what appears to be 11+, hmm.....

                  *Do It For Yourself, Do It Because They Said It Was Impossible, Do It Because They Said You Were Incapable*

                  PRs

                  5k - 24:40 (7:57 min/mile pace) 

                  10k - 54:39 (8:48 min/mile pace)

                  15k -1:24:04 (9:01 min/mile pace)

                  13.1 - 1:56:38 (8:54 min/mile pace) Sub 2 hours!!!

                   

                    I talked to someone recently that said when making this transition, that it's very helpful to wear the shoes for some everyday walking too. This will help the muscles and tendons adapt better.

                    MJ5


                    Chief Unicorn Officer

                      I'm a heel striker and I used to run in higher drop shoes, like 10-12mm. I tried to switch over completely to the Saucony Kinvara, which has a 4mm drop and my calves were always very fatigued. I now wear the New Balance 890v3 which is an 8mm drop and that seems to be my sweet spot, no more fatigue.

                      Mile 5:49 - 5K 19:58 - 10K 43:06 - HM 1:36:54

                      FreeSoul87


                      Runs4Sanity

                        I wonder if between 7-9mm would be good for me? 11+ still seems a bit much even now... Trying them out wouldn't hurt Smile

                        *Do It For Yourself, Do It Because They Said It Was Impossible, Do It Because They Said You Were Incapable*

                        PRs

                        5k - 24:40 (7:57 min/mile pace) 

                        10k - 54:39 (8:48 min/mile pace)

                        15k -1:24:04 (9:01 min/mile pace)

                        13.1 - 1:56:38 (8:54 min/mile pace) Sub 2 hours!!!

                         

                          I have run in the same NB's as MJ5. I didn't realize that they had such a large drop. I hated the new model and moved onto a shoe that has a

                          3-4mm drop. (I just looked that up) I am a midforefoot runner. Take some time and try different shoes.

                          Goorun


                            Eh, it's a pretty long discussion.  The current trend is definitely to reduce the drop in shoes, in favor of something that's closer to a 0 drop (same heel and toe height).  One thing that's pretty apparent is that a lower drop will put more pressure on your achilles and calf, so it's wise to transition slowly when going with a more minimal drop.

                             

                            The other variable that's really in play is what type of strike you have, be it a heel, mid foot, or forefoot strike and how that changes or is influenced by the shoe drop.

                             

                            All these issues are really why getting out and trying shoes on is pretty worthwhile.

                            Great answer.

                            Slow and steady never wins anything.


                            Trail Monster

                              I transitioned to zero drops from October through December. I wore a pair of Altra Intuitions daily for errands and such. Then I began running shorter runs in Altra Superiors. As I got more used to them I found it harder and harder to go back my Saucony Triumphs until eventually I ditched them completely.

                              2013 races:

                              3/17 Shamrock Marathon

                              4/20 North Coast 24 Hour

                              7/27 Burning RIver 100M

                              8/24 Baker 50M

                              10/5 Oil Creek (distance to be determined)

                               

                              My Blog

                               

                              Brands I Heart:

                              FitFluential

                              INKnBURN

                              Altra Zero Drop

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