The Bike Shop

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i'm buying a bike (Read 56 times)

     

    I don't own any "women's" bikes, if that helps.  Generally WSD bikes will have a slightly shorter top tube, but that's not even consistent.  Some brands simply use shorter-reach brakes and a women's saddle (which is generally wider and shorter) on women's frames...and, of course, girlier paint jobs.  Women can be longer limbed and shorter torso'd, but that's not always the case.  I'm built more like a dude, in that respect.

     

    Test a bunch of bikes in your price range and go with the one that fits best and suits the sort of terrain/riding you plan to do.

     

    Thanks. I have been asking a lot of questions and I am getting a better picture of what I want/need. It is a big purchase and one I will be stuck with for many years. I just want to have a good start.


    Hip Hip Hooray

      Probably around $1500. Those are two more brands that I haven't come across. Does it matter if ai buy a men's or women's bike? I have no preference.

       

      You need to find a bike that fits you - whether it's men's or women's is irrelevant.   The bike shop should take some measurements if they haven't already and figure out what will work for you in terms of sizing, etc.

       

      Once you know what size you are, then you need to figure out how you are going to use the bike, and go from there.  Disc brakes, honestly, make little difference in how the bike fits you or works for what you are trying to do.  It should be a secondary consideration, once you figure out the type of bike and the size that will fit you.  A good bike shop should be able to guide you in the right direction, because there are a lot of options out there!

       

        Thanks. So far, the shops have been pretty helpful, but one stands out with fitting. I think I have a pretty good idea about what I am looking at, I think I need to do some test rides and see what works for me.  I am really excited!


        Hip Hip Hooray

          And of course we'll need photos.  Big grin

           

            And of course we'll need photos.  Big grin

             

            Of course. I am just waiting on the snow. One of the shops has a two mile loop for test rides, but the more snow needs to melt.


            Needs more cowbell!

               

              Of course. I am just waiting on the snow. One of the shops has a two mile loop for test rides, but the more snow needs to melt.

               

              Snow blows!! Tongue

              I shoot pretty things! ~

              '14 Goals:

              • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

              • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

                 

                The pain that hurts the worse is the imagined pain. One of the most difficult arts of racing is learning to ignore the imagined pain and just live with the present pain (which is always bearable.) - Jeff

                 

                2014 Goals:

                 

                Stay healthy

                Enjoy life

                 


                Needs more cowbell!

                  When's "out like a lamb" going to happen?  We only have 5 more days of March...

                  I shoot pretty things! ~

                  '14 Goals:

                  • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

                  • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

                    Today would be a nice day to ride a bike, if I had one. i would need someone to watch my kids, too. Details, details...

                     

                    zoom-zoom, I have seen you mention how much you hate your aluminum frame a few times. What is wrong with it?

                      DJJan

                       

                      There is nothing wrong with an aluminum frame. Especially today.

                       

                      Aluminum is light weight , inexpensive, evironmentally freindly (relatively speaking) and rust proof. It is easy to shape, draw, drill and weld. It is a great material to make a bike out of.

                       

                      Aluminum gained a reputation for being a harsh ride. It is a very "stiff" material and can transmit road shock. Today the higher quality aluminum is less expensive than it was and is found in most of your entry level bikes on up. Today we also have available carbon fiber seat post, carbon forks and carbon handle bars which greatly reduce the shock.

                       

                      Oh...And it's repairable.

                       

                      I would not hesitate at all to recommend an aluminum bike.

                       

                      The harshest riding bike I have happens to be my full carbon fiber Cannondale but this bike is built to be as stiff as hell. One of my Ultra bikes ( 150 mile or more races) is a 2004 Schwinn Fastback all aluminum frame with a carbon fork. Sweet rideing bike.

                       

                      The way a bike is constructed and it's intended use has much to do with the ride quality.

                       

                      If you want the most comfortable riding road bike...I would suggest Chromoly (steel). Seriously, a pound of weight ain't gonna get you dropped on your next group ride.

                       

                      A must read

                         

                        A must read

                         

                        Thanks. Reading will only get me so far. What works for me, works for me and maybe not anyone else.

                          I bought ("borrowed") 3 used bikes from Craigslist before I bought my 2 keeper(s).

                          My first keeper was a new road bike (aluminum) that I rode for about a year before I realized I wanted a replacement keeper (carbon fiber Triathlon bike).
                          All 5 bikes were great, but my latest keeper is great.  I don't know that I could've found my main bike without having the other 4 bikes first.  But, maybe I could have.

                           

                          I don't have anything to offer as it relates to the style of bike you're looking for other than maybe not spending $1,500 on your first bike and maybe trying used bikes for your first year or two and then reselling them when you know what you want.


                          Cheers,
                          Brian

                          2014 Goals:

                          #1: Do what I can do. <DOING>

                          #2: 365 Hours training <NOPE, INJURED>

                           

                            That is a great point about not knowing what I want until I try some bikes. I have been looking at used, but I don't know enough about bikes to know what to look for. What I have recognized is more than I want to spend. I do not plan on spending $1500. I am kind of relying on friends (online) to guide me and the bike shop people to move me along in the right direction. I don't have any cyclist friends in town.

                             

                            I have been told that buying a bike the right size is pretty important.. I have looked at online calculators and I have an idea, but I really don't know. Is that something I will know by sitting on the bike?

                             

                            I am looking on craigalist, but nothing is jumping out to me.

                             

                            It seems so complicated. I started running about 14 years ago, so I can only vaguely remember that excitement about starting something new, I am trying really hard not to get caught up.


                            Needs more cowbell!

                              zoom-zoom, I have seen you mention how much you hate your aluminum frame a few times. What is wrong with it?

                               

                              My first bike was an aluminum Cannondale and was buzzy as hell on our roads, even with a wider tire -- but a LOT of our roads are also chipseal, so pretty much the worst possible road surface for riding.  My carbon Cannondale feels worlds comfier, even though it's a stiffer frame and a much more aggressive frame and I ride with 23mm tires, vs the 25s that I had on my alum. bike.  My CX bike is aluminum and just as comfortable on the road as my carbon road bike when it has slick tires, so all aluminum doesn't have to have a harsh ride.

                               

                              And steel....yeah.  I've considered going for a custom steel bike for my next road bike.  I LOVE my steel mountain bike (I mean, when it's not throwing me around and giving me broken wrists, and stuff Roll eyes).

                               

                              You could buy a bike based upon a sizing chart, but that's tricky if you don't already have the experience to know what geometry and sort of fit will work for you.  It could be a gamble.  If it were me I think I'd buy from a shop.  Then you're guaranteed some service for a while, too, and a warranty, which is nice.

                              I shoot pretty things! ~

                              '14 Goals:

                              • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

                              • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)


                              Hip Hip Hooray

                                As far as aluminum, like anything, it really depends on the quality and things like if you're on a carbon fork, the length of the wheel base, etc etc.  LOTS of variation in feel between a high end aluminum and a low end carbon and everything in between...

                                 

                                However, steel rules.  Big grin

                                 

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