Drinkers with a Running Problem

Home Brewers... (Read 1578 times)


A Dance with Monkeys

    I never use a scale.  The folks at the HB store weigh the grains to know how much to charge me, but that is about it.
      kinda thought that was your method. that's what I did with the hops. Now I've some left over Biscuit Malt, and 2 different kinds of hops. almost tempted to dry hop, this first all grain batch, but will wait and try that on something else.


      A Dance with Monkeys

        This time I'm trying to see how clear I can get the brew. Racked to secondary yesterday, from the pail to the carboy. Going to let it sit another week and then cold crash before I bottle.

         

        It is tempting to throw some of those hops in though.

         

        This is just my 3rd batch, 1st all grain. Plenty of time for experimenting.


        Prince of Fatness

          I hate to agree with Trent, but JC, if you like hops, throw them in there.

          Semi-retired.


          Prince of Fatness

            Updated list of things I need:

             

            1 5 gallon glass carboy

            1 8 - 9 gallon SS stock pot (cheapest price I found is $75)

            2  1 5 gallon food grade buckets for zapap (still need my son to get one)

            1 spigot

            1 floating thermometer

            extra tubing

            grain bags

             

            Stock pot was delivered early this week.  Jeebus, it's big.  I should be able to handle any 5 gallon batch with that sucker.  The kid brought home the bucket.  Everything else I will get from the LBHS Friday, so it's a go for my first all grain batch Saturday.

             

            I am using this recipe.

            Semi-retired.


            Prince of Fatness

              Beer is in the fermenting bucket bubbling away.  First all grain brew went OK.

               

              Mash was uneventful  I did one quart per pound and it did not quite fill the 21 quart pot.  I used the oven to keep it warm.

               

              I had a little problem with the sparge.  I read that you put some water in first and I should not have done it.  When I put the mash in it went up over the level of the lower bucket and started spilling out.  Luckily I had a helper and he lifted the inner bucket and I drained the excess, which was recirculated back in later.  I also may have had some of the sparge water too hot..  We'll see what affect this has on the flavor, if any.  Good thing that I was in the garage by the way.

               

              Lesson learned here.  I do not believe that I need prime the sparge.  I should not have to worry about a stuck sparge because I bought a large grain back which keeps pretty much any grains from escaping, so I can gently stir the grains.  This was not a big deal and I'll know what to do next time.

               

              Somehow amid the confusion I ended up will too much volume in the brew kettle.  I had to boil off some wort first, which took at least a half hour.  I got it down to around 6 gallons, added my hops, and started the boil.  The rest was uneventful since I have done it before.  The outdoor burner kicks ass by the way.  Obviously because of the higher volume it took longer to chill the wort,

               

              The whole process took under 6 hours.  I cleaned as I went along so there is no mess to deal with this morning.  Mrs PH is happy about that.  I have my glass carboy and will rack to it next weekend.

               

              Thanks to all that helped me get started in home brewing.

               

              Semi-retired.


              A Dance with Monkeys

                Cool work!

                 

                I never prime the sparge.


                Prince of Fatness

                  Yeah, I agree.  I over complicated the sparge.  I had a bottling bucket up top and trickled the water in from there.  I don't think that it was necessary.  That grain bag really helps with filtering even when disturbing the grain bed.  Next time I will  skip the bottling bucket and the priming.  I'll just pour the mash in, and gently pour the sparge water in from a large pyrex measuring cup.  Even when the grain bed looked dry there was lots of buoyancy when I stirred it.  Easy fix for next time.  Thanks.

                  Semi-retired.


                  Prince of Fatness

                    Here is the Belgian Blonde in the carboy.

                     

                    Semi-retired.


                    A Dance with Monkeys

                      Nice!  The volume appears a bit low.  Been tasting?


                      Prince of Fatness

                        No, I noticed that I was a little short when it went in the bucket.  That was from having too much volume to start the boil.  I had to boil some extra off and I guess that I overdid it.  That outdoor burner boils off water a lot quicker than the stove top.  I'll get used to it.  I turned it down when I added the hops and started the clock but I think that I boiled off too much before that.

                        Semi-retired.


                        Former runner

                          Here are some pics from the American Blonde I brewed last weekend. We were planning on brewing 10 gallons so that I could split the batch into two 5 gal batches. Although we ended up with more than 12 gal in the carboys so I guess I need to tweak my effiencies in the software I use.

                          I decided to make a 2L starter so that I could increase my yeast pitching rate without buying a bunch of vials of yeast. This was day 2 of the starter on the DIY stirplate.

                           

                           

                           

                          23 lbs of American 2-row barley and 1 lb of Crystal 10. Crushed at the LHBS.

                           

                           

                          Half of the grain in the cooler getting ready to start adding the water. 66° grain + 165° water = 151° mash-in temp. I use the Brewsmith program for all these calculations.



                          7.5 gal of water and 24 lbs of grain mashed at 151° for 60 minutes. Temps dropped to 149° after an hour.



                          This is where I realized that technology can help but only if you pay attention to the details. The software gave a warning that the mash tun volume was going to be exceeded but for some dumb reason I ignored it. I was supposed to mash out at 168° but the temp only got to 160°. Close enough.

                           



                          Collecting the first runnings to set the grain bed. We ran off a couple gallons and recirculated it back through to filter out the small particles. After that we collected the wort in a couple 5 gal coolers to keep it hot until we could put it in the brew pot. We ended up collecting over 8 gal of wort in the first runnings so we only needed a single sparge with about 6 gal of water.



                          Got the boil going and just added the 2 oz of Willamette.



                          Chilling the wort after the boil. Last sighting of the thermometer before it fell in.



                          Dinner break. Brewing beer can be real work.



                          Aerating the carboys with the stainless degassing rod.



                          Approximately 12.5 gals ready to start fermenting. These were bubbling within a few hours. I barely got my half home before the krausen started escaping.

                           

                           


                          Day 2 of fermentation. This is why I prefer fermenting in my basement and use blow-off tubes.

                           

                          Ross


                          A Dance with Monkeys

                            Sweet!  What did you use to hop it?


                            Former runner

                              We used 2 oz of Willamette. Roughly 16 IBUs. Should be a nice refreshing summer brew.

                              Ross